Lawyer considering nursing - page 3

by legaleagle30

7,976 Visits | 38 Comments

hello, I just wanted to get some thoughts from RNs and CRNAs. I am a lawyer now working part time. I have small kids. I could either work part time with a family member as a lawyer and try to build up my own area of practice... Read More


  1. 0
    Hahahahaha!!!! This was toooooo funny. Stay with the lawyering a few more years.

    Try some different specialities. Take on a variety of cases.

    Best Wishes!!!
  2. 3
    Quote from Paco69
    Most nurses who tell lawyers not to leave their profession to be a nurse don't realize how emotionally taxing a legal career can be, and that in many respects the grass is greener as an RN. I can speak to both now,
    Can't really speak to both yet. Until you actually have worked those 12 hour shifts on your feet all day, which are really 13 hours on a good day, you don't really know what it's like. I mean, did you really know what it was like to be an attorney all day/every day in law school?
    NurseLay, RNsRWe, and himilayaneyes like this.
  3. 0
    CRNA's make so much money because they have to work their glutes off to get where they are. As an RN in my area I clear over $100,000 annually & easily w/ a little modest overtime, many of the 2 year degree nurses make similar money.
  4. 0
    One other thing to consider is that working part-time as new nursing grad may be difficult. That was my plan as second degree RN (actually third degree in my case since I also have an MBA) but it has not worked out.

    In most, but not all, parts of the country, new grads are finding a difficult job market and this particularly true for ADN's. Getting a nursing job will certainly be difficult, finding a part-time position as an inexperienced RN may be close to impossible.
  5. 0
    I REALLY appreciate all your insight!! It is a difficult decision but I do think that in these economic times, it is easy to think of the other career options as the grass is greener over there.
    Please keep the info coming! it is so valuable to making this big decision!
  6. 0
    Quote from wooh
    Can't really speak to both yet. Until you actually have worked those 12 hour shifts on your feet all day, which are really 13 hours on a good day, you don't really know what it's like. I mean, did you really know what it was like to be an attorney all day/every day in law school?
    No, I did not "really know what it was like to be an attorney all day/every day in law school," because unfortunately law school does not give one many opportunities to be in "clinical" (equivalent thereof) situations while in school as one has in nursing school. Additionally, I did not do my due diligence before law school by sitting with lawyers and shadowing them to determine if that was the career path for me. Had I done that, I am sure I would have not gone. However, I DID do this for nursing school, quite thoroughly in fact, and I have had a more positive outcome as a result.

    If I had to design my own law school, I would make it 2 years of lecture instead of 3, and the third year would incorporate some sort of internship in a law firm or an environment conducive to learning the craft one intends to practice. What one needs to know to pass a bar exam is plenty addressed within two years; the 3rd year is full of electives and does not enhance lawyering any more in a classroom as it would practicing in the trenches with real clients and real situations. In fact, most law grads enter the law firms not knowing how to do a real estate closing. Roughly compare this to a nurse, who by graduation has learned how to back-prime a piggyback and can do this from day one at work (I am not going to sit here and argue the merits of this analogy, I am just illustrating a general point).

    My med-surg clinical and capstone experience has been on the same med-surg floor of our university hospital, on a 1:1 basis the entire time since I am part of a dedicated education unit (DEU). At this point halfway through capstone, I am taking care of 3 patients on my own (half of my preceptor's patients) from beginning to end of shift reports, including vitals and ADLs if time allows. My preceptor supervision continues until I graduate, but right now it's minimal in skills I have done over and over (I no longer need to be watched to fingerstick and administer appropriate lispro; the preceptor checks off my entries on the MAR -- but of course I don't push meds or hang blood as a student). On this floor, I am not a stranger to 14 hour days, they have occurred (with my net pay being $0). This floor also houses some of the sickest in the hospital and frequently get transferred to and from MICU. They are needy, they whine, they demand meds, they will crap on you once you make the final clean wipe. I am the first to admit this is not easy work! But in the end, I confidently say am not as exhausted as I used to be leaving a law firm after an equally long day. And that's interesting to say considering I am 15 years older now.

    So I may not know right now what it's like to be a nurse several years into his career, but I do have a better window into what my nursing career will be like as opposed to when I graduated from law school without a mandatory law firm internship under my belt (and competitive paid summer internships just don't cut it because it's luck of the draw to get one and the tasks summer clerks do are not anywhere near what a real lawyer does). The experience is enough for me to know that I prefer pure nursing than pure law practice ... so to some extent, I think I CAN speak to both.
    Last edit by Paco-RN on May 2, '12
  7. 1
    I was at one time also "about to graduate." I know all about senior practicums. I did mine as a student, and I've done them as a preceptor. Until you are ON YOUR OWN with your own license dealing with all the little things that have absolutely nothing to do with your load of patients for the day, you do NOT know what it is truly like to be a nurse.

    I'm not saying you're going to suddenly hate it. For all I know, you will love nursing with all your heart that you'll skip retirement and die during a med pass at age 112.

    I am saying that right now, NO, you cannot speak to both. Depending on how long it takes you to pass NCLEX, get a job, and get through orientation and a few months to lose the honeymoon delight, then you can speak to both.
    OCNRN63 likes this.
  8. 0
    Can I ask why you want to become a nurse and drop your job as a lawyer? I wanted to become a lawyer for the longest time before I realized that it would be incredibly difficult to get hired, I didn't want to have to beg for a job after getting an advanced degree. What's the motivation for you to go into nursing?
  9. 2
    Quote from wooh
    I was at one time also "about to graduate." I know all about senior practicums. I did mine as a student, and I've done them as a preceptor. Until you are ON YOUR OWN with your own license dealing with all the little things that have absolutely nothing to do with your load of patients for the day, you do NOT know what it is truly like to be a nurse.

    I'm not saying you're going to suddenly hate it. For all I know, you will love nursing with all your heart that you'll skip retirement and die during a med pass at age 112.

    I am saying that right now, NO, you cannot speak to both. Depending on how long it takes you to pass NCLEX, get a job, and get through orientation and a few months to lose the honeymoon delight, then you can speak to both.
    I ended my last post by saying "to some extent, I think I CAN speak to both." To some extent means I have had at least some exposure to both professions and can say what I can say about it all and how I feel about entering both professions. Yes, when I fully can speak to both is when I have an equal amount of time in nursing as I did in law, roughly 10 years from now.

    This is my last post on the matter, because it seems like you want to have the one-up on me on this discussion, and if so then you can have it. I really don't care ... if that is important to you ... fine, you win! I simply agree to disagree with you ...

    And alas, you are right once again! I don't plan on retiring anytime soon, EXCEPT that I pictured my exit from this world during end-of-shift report at age 125. During med pass?? How droll ... and a disservice to my patients!

    Proceed with your flame, I'm done here ... Goodbye!!
    RunnerRN2b2014 and KG247 like this.
  10. 1
    I urge you to avoid the mistake of entering nursing for a better lifestyle. Instead, I suggest that you volunteer at a local hospital, and tell the nurses that you are considering nursing and want to help them out as much as possible. First, they will love you for helping, second, you will see what a life in nursing really involves.

    If better hours are your main motivation, I hope that you will reconsider. I think that you may have underestimated how hard it is to become a nurse, and to practice as one. Nursing is not a job one does, it is something that one becomes. Becoming a nurse is a passage that will change who you are, and at the cost of considerable time and effort. Make sure that it is what you want.

    Best wishes to you!
    wooh likes this.


Top