Just finished my first semester. Ask me anything. - page 5

by MeTheRN

87,546 Views | 248 Comments

Wow...I can't believe it's only been been 3 1/2 months! It feels like it's been at least a year. But finally, a few hours ago today, I took my last final and finished my first semester of CRNA school! I figured this would be a... Read More


  1. 0
    what were the classes you took in your first semester?
  2. 0
    Iíve been reading every thread in your post because there are so many great questions being answered here. I just now realized that you started out at a community college and I almost cried. I just applied to a couple of BSN programs in my area, and Iím also going to be a community college transfer student. My GPA is only a 3.7( It could and should be higher, I slacked and got a few Bís that I shouldnít have) at the CC and Iíve been so overwhelmed as to whether Iíll be able to keep my grade at that level at the university or not. I know youíre so far beyond this point now, but what was your GPA when you transferred to the BSN program? Iíve already been accepted to the university of the BSN program (just waiting to hear back from the nursing department now) and they also invited me to join the honorís program which will include me doing an undergrad thesis. Is this similar to the research project you co-authored? Would you suggest I accept this? Part of me wants to take it because itíll give me an edge when I actually do apply to grad school, but another part of me doesnít quite know what to expect in the BSN program and wants to keep my priorities focused on that. Did you find the transition from CC to University overwhelming? Obviously you have great stats, so are there any pointers you could give me to be as successful as possible as Iím still at the threshold of my journey?
  3. 0
    Two questions.
    1) how should I prepare for the program, as in making my chances of being accepted higher?
    2) I know you said I havn't did clinicals yet, but would you know if they involve using animals to test on?

    thank you!
  4. 0
    Quote from luciddreeams
    Just curious, what is the actual degree you're going to attain once you graduate? Is it an MSN? Also, do you have to write a thesis;if so what topic are you considering?
    I will have a master of science in nurse anesthesia. It's not an MSN degree, so generally there's less nursing theory and writing. We have to do a mini-proposal in our research course, but not a formal thesis. I'm writing about treating shivering related to induced hypothermia.
    Last edit by MeTheRN on Feb 26, '12 : Reason: typo :)
  5. 1
    Quote from luciddreeams
    what were the classes you took in your first semester?
    The classes depend on which semester you start in (Fall or Spring). I started in the Fall and took pathophysiology, pharmacology, intro to advanced practice nursing, policy/ethics of nurse anesthesia, and chemistry/physics.
    luciddreeams likes this.
  6. 2
    Quote from luciddreeams
    I’ve been reading every thread in your post because there are so many great questions being answered here. I just now realized that you started out at a community college and I almost cried. I just applied to a couple of BSN programs in my area, and I’m also going to be a community college transfer student. My GPA is only a 3.7( It could and should be higher, I slacked and got a few B’s that I shouldn’t have) at the CC and I’ve been so overwhelmed as to whether I’ll be able to keep my grade at that level at the university or not. I know you’re so far beyond this point now, but what was your GPA when you transferred to the BSN program? I’ve already been accepted to the university of the BSN program (just waiting to hear back from the nursing department now) and they also invited me to join the honor’s program which will include me doing an undergrad thesis. Is this similar to the research project you co-authored? Would you suggest I accept this? Part of me wants to take it because it’ll give me an edge when I actually do apply to grad school, but another part of me doesn’t quite know what to expect in the BSN program and wants to keep my priorities focused on that. Did you find the transition from CC to University overwhelming? Obviously you have great stats, so are there any pointers you could give me to be as successful as possible as I’m still at the threshold of my journey?
    Funny enough, my transfer GPA was also a 3.7! I raised my GPA with the nursing classes and graduated summa cum laude. I would absolutely encourage you to accept the honors program proposal. You will be able to present your thesis and defend it against a panel of advisers, and grad schools will absolutely eat this up. It won't necessarily help you in getting an ICU job, but it will help tremendously with your application and make you stand out.

    I actually studied harder in the CC because the instructors weren't as...um...polished as the university instructors were. My best advice is to study like crazy and definitely do study groups with other students. That's actually what I'm doing in school now to keep myself sharp and focused. Another thing is you have to learn mental discipline. Train your mind to stay on task and review what you've learned every 30-60min or so. Consider going to a local health food grocer and buying a brain supplement. I like the ones from Whole Foods. I also listen to a hypnosis recording designed to expand your memory. Needless to say I try a lot of different things to keep me sharp

    Another suggestion is if you don't understand something, go up to the instructors and ask in between classes or on breaks. It's a great way to get yourself known and you'll be smarter for it.
    pinayhomegirl and luciddreeams like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from littletwinstar
    Two questions.
    1) how should I prepare for the program, as in making my chances of being accepted higher?
    2) I know you said I havn't did clinicals yet, but would you know if they involve using animals to test on?

    thank you!
    1. Kill the GRE's, that's a great way to get accepted. Low GRE's and GPA scores can be overlooked if you have a lot of killer ICU experience.
    2. We do not anesthetize animals, but if you attend a difficult airway work shop, you might be able to trach a pig's trachea for practice for emergent tracheostomies!
  8. 0
    Quote from loveanesthesia
    other universities will not recognize that you have a degree. this will affect you if you want to obtain a doctorate from another university or if you want to teach at another university. it will be like your highest begree is your bsn.
    personally i'm not in a hurry to get my dnap, since we have until 2025 until it is a requirement for entry-to-practice and i'll be grandfathered in. if i ever get the itch to teach or if i see it is becoming necessary for my work (if i want to work in a state with different laws), then i will either go back to wolford for my dnap online or by then they will have their regional accreditation, so i will get my doctorate from whichever school best fits my needs.

    for the record, wolford is in the process of attaining regional accreditation. it is completely and fully accredited by the council of accreditation of nurse anesthesia. as a matter of fact, the program was accredited for 10 years (the maximum any program can be accredited for before needing to be re-evaluated).

    [color=#595959]wolford college
    nurse anesthesia program

    [color=#595959]1336 creekside blvd
    [color=#595959]suite 2
    [color=#595959]naples, fl 34108

    [color=#595959]program information
    [color=#595959]date of last review:[color=#595959] 5/2008
    [color=#595959]next review date:[color=#595959] 5/2018
    [color=#595959]degree(s):[color=#595959] master of science in nurse anesthesia (entry level), doctor of nurse anesthesia practice (completion), master of science (completion)
    [color=#595959]program length:[color=#595959] 28 months
    [color=#595959]starting month(s):[color=#595959] october, february

    i'm not saying the program is perfect, but i would like to clear some things up. as far as other schools not honoring my ms in na, yes it's true they can do that. but after i get my degree in anesthesia, i'm not really planning on more schooling until it is absolutely necessary, as i mentioned above.

    as far as getting hired after school, employers care about two things: have you passed your boards and able to practice freely, and are you competent. they don't really care about your gpa, where you went to school, or if your program had regional accreditation. if wolford were not accredited, none of the students would be able to sit for the boards, and the pass rates wouldn't be in the high 90%.
  9. 0
    thank you so much! that last question was sitting heavily on my conscience.

    Do you have any advice as to how to get into ICU being a new grad? I'm not seeing/hearing any places that are really hiring them (1 year experiance requirement) and I'm sure ICU is much more competitive.
    This might sound dumb, but would ICU experiance count if you were not paid for it? I'd be willing to work for free if I needed to.
  10. 1
    Quote from littletwinstar
    thank you so much! that last question was sitting heavily on my conscience.

    Do you have any advice as to how to get into ICU being a new grad? I'm not seeing/hearing any places that are really hiring them (1 year experiance requirement) and I'm sure ICU is much more competitive.
    This might sound dumb, but would ICU experiance count if you were not paid for it? I'd be willing to work for free if I needed to.
    It really depends on you. In the ICU I was hired into, they were having a lot of people going out on maternity leave and management was changing, so it was the perfect opportunity to slip in . But I really had to make my case in order to get in. Before I graduated nursing school, I had my ACLS/PALS certification and I had my clinical practicum in the cardiovascular ICU. Every single day I would show up to practicum looking great and with a smile on my face. I harassed every single person on the unit for learning opportunities :spin:. I hounded the nurse manager and gave him my resume (a few times, actually ). I sent cover letters and made many telephone calls.

    Most ICU's aren't interested in hiring new grads unless they're having staffing issues. Luckily, mine was. When I left, they were in a better position staffing wise, so I didn't feel too bad about it. But while I was working there, I always asked if we'd ever hire another new grad and the answer was always NO!

    A few of my friends got hired into ICU's at regional hospitals, one even got offered a job in a MICU that still used paper charting . It really depends on you. If you just want to get in and get the year of ICU exp and get out, work as a tech somewhere and apply to every little hospital in your state. I honestly was expecting to be an ICU nurse for a few years before school, so I picked a good hospital with lots of trauma to get me great experience. Things just happened a lot sooner than I expected .
    sth90 likes this.


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