Just finished my first semester. Ask me anything. - page 4

by MeTheRN

86,200 Views | 248 Comments

Wow...I can't believe it's only been been 3 1/2 months! It feels like it's been at least a year. But finally, a few hours ago today, I took my last final and finished my first semester of CRNA school! I figured this would be a... Read More


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    Woww. I'm getting excited just reading your post.
    Inimica18 and sth90 like this.
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    Hello! These are definitely great and helpful discussions! I am a new grad that just got hired onto a Post-Operative Medical-Surgical floor in a smaller community hospital and am 3 weeks into the new graduate program. Although I am contracted for about a year, I want to do everything I am capable of doing now to increase my chances of getting into a CRNA program later down the line. Being aware of some of the requirements, I plan to transfer to an ICU unit as soon as I am able to. I guess one of my concerns is that I only had a 3.25 GPA as an undergrad in my BSN program. I guess you can call me your "average" student who lacked much extracurricular involvement and such. What do you guys suggest I start working on now to increase my chances of even being considered into a CRNA program? So far, I've been considering obtaining certifications (CCRN), possibly joining committees, becoming a preceptor for other new graduates/hires, etc. Any other suggestions?
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    Quote from DeeLlor
    Hello! These are definitely great and helpful discussions! I am a new grad that just got hired onto a Post-Operative Medical-Surgical floor in a smaller community hospital and am 3 weeks into the new graduate program. Although I am contracted for about a year, I want to do everything I am capable of doing now to increase my chances of getting into a CRNA program later down the line. Being aware of some of the requirements, I plan to transfer to an ICU unit as soon as I am able to. I guess one of my concerns is that I only had a 3.25 GPA as an undergrad in my BSN program. I guess you can call me your "average" student who lacked much extracurricular involvement and such. What do you guys suggest I start working on now to increase my chances of even being considered into a CRNA program? So far, I've been considering obtaining certifications (CCRN), possibly joining committees, becoming a preceptor for other new graduates/hires, etc. Any other suggestions?
    Congrats on being hired! First and foremost, learn to be a good nurse. Remember that you will need a recommendation from your direct supervisor and a colleague, so being a good nurse regardless of what acuity you're at is the basis of everything. Once you have a handle on being a graduate nurse, explore ways of taking on more responsibility. Join the unit practice council, the journal club, things like that. It'll show you're willing to get involved. If you want some extra homework, definitely study for the GRE. It's a perfect time because you're learning curve isn't as steep since you don't work in the ICU already, so it should be OK and doable to study for the GRE while learning the scoop on your floor. The less than stellar GPA can be replaced by a high GRE score and good ICU experience on an involved floor. Do your year and then definitely transfer to the ICU, but make sure to take the most complicated patients you can in the mean time to learn!
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    Hi!

    First of all, I would like to thank you for offering to share your experiences as a new SRNA and being willing to answer all the questions. I have been lurking on the site for the last 6 years, ever since I decided to change my life and to become an RN. For years, I had seen the pattern when the aspiring SRNAs would beg for the information, and as soon as they will get accepted, despite being on the site for some time, they just disappear, and never respond to the troves of people like themslves, just a couple of weeks ago, who want to have the first-hand account, but they just don't care. You are the opposite of that, and the information that you volunteered to provide is golden, so thanks once again!

    Your stats are VERY impressive, and your know that well, because you were the one who earned them. So my question is, why with your fantastic application, that would enable you to attend any CRNA program, including any in the the top 10, you still choose Wolford. It is one of 3 schools that I'm going to apply to, but my concern is, with dwindling employment opportunities for new grad. CRNAs, will the fact that you graduated from the program ranked as 99 out of 108 will complicate your job search for the first position as a new grad CRNA? What do your peers think about this?

    Thanks again for doing this!!!
  5. 5
    Quote from MEDBRAT08
    Hi!

    First of all, I would like to thank you for offering to share your experiences as a new SRNA and being willing to answer all the questions. I have been lurking on the site for the last 6 years, ever since I decided to change my life and to become an RN. For years, I had seen the pattern when the aspiring SRNAs would beg for the information, and as soon as they will get accepted, despite being on the site for some time, they just disappear, and never respond to the troves of people like themslves, just a couple of weeks ago, who want to have the first-hand account, but they just don't care. You are the opposite of that, and the information that you volunteered to provide is golden, so thanks once again!

    Your stats are VERY impressive, and your know that well, because you were the one who earned them. So my question is, why with your fantastic application, that would enable you to attend any CRNA program, including any in the the top 10, you still choose Wolford. It is one of 3 schools that I'm going to apply to, but my concern is, with dwindling employment opportunities for new grad. CRNAs, will the fact that you graduated from the program ranked as 99 out of 108 will complicate your job search for the first position as a new grad CRNA? What do your peers think about this?

    Thanks again for doing this!!!
    First of all, you're very welcome. I really like sharing information and writing, so it suites me very well to share my experiences with an eager audience. I wouldn't judge the other SRNA's too harshly, most people really do constantly study while they are in this program. But you're welcome!

    Secondly, you asked a very great question. And if I have to be completely honest with you (which I will, because if I'm not then what's the point of this thread?) I ultimately decided to go to Wolford because I wanted to live in Naples again. I grew up in Naples and moved away for college and stayed for my ICU job. When I was looking at anesthesia schools, I was thrilled to find an established, single-purpose CRNA program in my back yard. You're right, I could have gone anywhere. I applied to so many schools and got into every one that I interviewed at. I could have gone to Mayo, Gooding's, and a few other big name schools. But ultimately being able to be with my family and see my little brother and sister grow up won out for me.

    Now regarding employment, every single Wolford graduate has gotten employment. Every single one. The thing about Wolford is that so many students are from out of state, and most of them go back to their original states after they're done with school. The ones that stick around have a harder time finding jobs in FL due to the market, but if they're willing to look, jobs are out there. For example, Collier Anesthesia is hiring, and a few companies in Tampa are hiring. If you go on gaswork.com, you can see how many CRNA jobs are listed across the nation, not including the ones that are never posted. There are numerous opportunities to get hired at FANA and AANA meetings via networking.

    I am a big believer that the student is what ultimately makes the educational experience great or disastrous. I went from community college to a regular public university. I had over 200 students in my general science courses and still all the instructors knew my name and who I was. Then in nursing school, we had 120+ students. In clinicals, I would fight and plot for every opportunity to have the most complicated patients with the difficult airways and complicated medications and dressings. I was the only one who was hired straight into a level I trauma center ICU, and the only one so far to get into CRNA school. At work, I was the one always looking to admit the massive head bleeds or the AAA with enthusiasm. I am one of the youngest students in my class, and I am consistently getting some of the highest grades. One instructor in particular has taken to mentoring me and shares a lot of additional information with me. I'm not trying to brag, but the point I'm trying to make is just because you attend a school that is ranked higher, that does not mean you will automatically be a better practitioner. I definitely look forward to updating this forum after every semester and eventually after I graduate, and then I'll have much more insightful information regarding whether or not going to Wolford was the right decision. But as of now, I'm extremely good with my decision.
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    The new accreditation standards from the COA effective 2014 require institutional accreditation. Wolford will need to gain accreditation or the program will be closed. It's likely to cost them some money to fix the things that will be required, so it will be interesting to see if the leadership will invest the money. If they do gain accreditation, the students from then on will have a recognized degree which will be a positive.
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    What happens if you are currently enrolled and the institution does not become accredited?
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    Other universities will not recognize that you have a degree. This will affect you if you want to obtain a doctorate from another university or if you want to teach at another university. It will be like your highest begree is your BSN.
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    Thank you very much for your reply MeTheRN! I wish you the best of luck in your studies, and looking forward to hear how things are progressing!
  10. 0
    Just curious, what is the actual degree you're going to attain once you graduate? Is it an MSN? Also, do you have to write a thesis;if so what topic are you considering?


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