Just finished my first semester. Ask me anything. - page 12

by MeTheRN

86,015 Views | 248 Comments

Wow...I can't believe it's only been been 3 1/2 months! It feels like it's been at least a year. But finally, a few hours ago today, I took my last final and finished my first semester of CRNA school! I figured this would be a... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from ufblondi
    I just got the info yesterday. For fall classes are Mon from 8-2 (or maybe it was 230). And tues from 8-6 (!! Long day). You have to buy the books through the school as a package which i don't like..$1800 for that.
    Hopefully you get a nice break on Tuesday for lunch. Go out and eat in front of the canal and see our pet gator!
  2. 1
    Hello Methrn, thanks for responding to our questions.

    1. When did you decide to tell your nurse manager about your decision to pursue NA school? How did they react? (I fear some may be less than willing to write one knowing that the training they gave would not benefit them more than a year)
    2. Were you hired into the the hospital in a new grad residency? if so did they require a time commitment that you had to break and pay a fine for?

    My goal is to become a CRNA as well and I am working my way towards that. Where I live most hospitals require a certain number of years before moving on and only hire ICU nurses through a residency. Hopefully i will get a ICU position right after a graduate (god willing) and will have a manager willing to write one without feeling deceived or mislead to think I wanted to stay in ICU for a long time.


    I do like how wolford has rolling admission that will enable someone to start sooner vs waiting the standard "1 year in advance" application process.....this explains how you had 1 year of experience and was able to start
    Aroww333 likes this.
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    Quote from HopefulNurse2011
    Hello Methrn, thanks for responding to our questions.

    1. When did you decide to tell your nurse manager about your decision to pursue NA school? How did they react? (I fear some may be less than willing to write one knowing that the training they gave would not benefit them more than a year)
    2. Were you hired into the the hospital in a new grad residency? if so did they require a time commitment that you had to break and pay a fine for?

    My goal is to become a CRNA as well and I am working my way towards that. Where I live most hospitals require a certain number of years before moving on and only hire ICU nurses through a residency. Hopefully i will get a ICU position right after a graduate (god willing) and will have a manager willing to write one without feeling deceived or mislead to think I wanted to stay in ICU for a long time.

    I do like how wolford has rolling admission that will enable someone to start sooner vs waiting the standard "1 year in advance" application process.....this explains how you had 1 year of experience and was able to start
    I was wondering the exact same thing...I would like to put my in soon. 2 of my charge nurse are already on board with writing me a great LOR, but I'm trying to guage my Unit Supervisor. She is nice overall, but just uncertain how she will feel about my decision to pursue CRNA school for this coming year. I'm planning on taking my CCRN next month, and when I pass it, I can lead with that....
  4. 1
    Quote from HopefulNurse2011
    Hello Methrn, thanks for responding to our questions.

    1. When did you decide to tell your nurse manager about your decision to pursue NA school? How did they react? (I fear some may be less than willing to write one knowing that the training they gave would not benefit them more than a year)
    2. Were you hired into the the hospital in a new grad residency? if so did they require a time commitment that you had to break and pay a fine for?

    My goal is to become a CRNA as well and I am working my way towards that. Where I live most hospitals require a certain number of years before moving on and only hire ICU nurses through a residency. Hopefully i will get a ICU position right after a graduate (god willing) and will have a manager willing to write one without feeling deceived or mislead to think I wanted to stay in ICU for a long time.


    I do like how wolford has rolling admission that will enable someone to start sooner vs waiting the standard "1 year in advance" application process.....this explains how you had 1 year of experience and was able to start
    1. I do not claim that this was the best or most politically correct way to handle the situation, but this is what I did. My nursing supervisor found out I was interested in going to CRNA school when he found my paperwork in his mailbox requesting a LOR. After that, the ANM's came and talked to me about applying to anesthesia school without telling them. I'm not sure if I should have done so first or not, but that was their gripe with me. I apologized and told them that after shadowing and exploring my possibilities with advanced nursing, I decided to attempt to apply to CRNA school. I told them that I was applying mainly for the experience and would happily remain working on the unit if I were not admitted to any program. Ultimately I was accepted into the program, so the supervisor gave me a fair LOR. I gave my unit 2-3 months notice, so they had plenty of time to find a replacement for me. I felt sad leaving my friends and co-workers, but I had to think about my future and my livelihood. I'm still in contact with my old unit and they're doing fine and enjoy my regular updates about school on my facebook.

    2. Yes, I was contracted to the hospital for 2 years. I was 3-4 months shy of meeting my time commitment, so I had to pay $1800 to the hospital. It was taken out of my PTO bank, so I never had to directly pay them anything. The best advice I have for you is to try to clep out of any classes you can by attempting to take the final exam and if you score high enough, the hospital may not require you to take the course (which is what primarily contracted me to the unit).

    I actually started CRNA school with 1.25 years of ICU experience. Turns out you can apply to the school with less than a year of exp as long as you meet that requirement by the time the program starts. But some schools might not want you when you're so green.
    Aroww333 likes this.
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    MeTheRN, thanks for chiming in, I was thinking of just doing what you said was probably no the most 'politically correct way to do that...

    it's crazy how some nursing supervisors will react when they realize you're trying to push forward...It's not like you'd gunning for their job!!! I do agree however that a warm up discussion is a good idea, so they can't say they were caught off guard...Quite honestly I wish they didn't have a hand in the process...
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    Although I can understand and appreciate the time and resources put into training a critical care nurse, ultimately I had to be a little selfish and think of my own future. I like to think I paid my dues by working extremely hard and really contributing to my work environment rather than detracting from it. I would often come in and pick up extra shifts and almost always cover for someone who called off or had an emergency. I put my heart and soul into becoming an ICU nurse. If you give it your all, they can't really fault you for leaving to better your life.

    If by chance the supervisor gives you a negative LOR, I believe schools take into consideration the volatile nature of nursing management and may still extend you an interview based on your credentials. Plus, the other LORs from your coworker and former instructor can balance out the supervisor. The stronger your credentials and application, the less weight a negative recommendation from a supervisor will hold.
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    @MeTheRN, thanx for brining this topic up. I have heard from a lot of people from my unit that they were timid asking for an LOR just because our unit is known for breeding CRNAs. It stinks that this is one of the only jobs I know that people get upset that you want to go back to school and better yourself and put in the hard work to get ahead. Even some of the charge nurses sometimes bring up that they know all the young new grads are just there til they get apply to CRNA school. I hope my credentials will speak for themselves rather than a bitter NM who is losing a good nurse and would actually stoop to talk negative about a good employee so they can keep them, shm.
    Aroww333 likes this.
  8. 0
    Hello!!

    This is a great thread. I want to be a CRNA one day, but I have a long way to go as I am only taking prenursing courses but gosh I am so excited and motivated! There is one thing that concerns me. I am squeamish. What does working in the ICU entail? I used to not be able to look at blood but once I decided I wanted to be a nurse, I forced myself to watch documentaries and now I can watch autopsies being done (i still cringe) and find it fascinating. I am wondering if everyone gets over their squeamishness once they start working? I dont know if I could handle treating someone with bones sticking out or third degree burns all over...
  9. 1
    Quote from Pattycakes85
    Hello!!

    This is a great thread. I want to be a CRNA one day, but I have a long way to go as I am only taking prenursing courses but gosh I am so excited and motivated! There is one thing that concerns me. I am squeamish. What does working in the ICU entail? I used to not be able to look at blood but once I decided I wanted to be a nurse, I forced myself to watch documentaries and now I can watch autopsies being done (i still cringe) and find it fascinating. I am wondering if everyone gets over their squeamishness once they start working? I dont know if I could handle treating someone with bones sticking out or third degree burns all over...
    As a crna, you may see heads being cut open in the OR, body parts being sewn together. It's still early. You're mind may change along the way. Good luck.
    MeTheRN likes this.
  10. 1
    Quote from Pattycakes85
    Hello!!

    This is a great thread. I want to be a CRNA one day, but I have a long way to go as I am only taking prenursing courses but gosh I am so excited and motivated! There is one thing that concerns me. I am squeamish. What does working in the ICU entail? I used to not be able to look at blood but once I decided I wanted to be a nurse, I forced myself to watch documentaries and now I can watch autopsies being done (i still cringe) and find it fascinating. I am wondering if everyone gets over their squeamishness once they start working? I dont know if I could handle treating someone with bones sticking out or third degree burns all over...
    Hey there pattycakes85, first off I would encourage you to do the best you can in your prerequisites (esp sciences), this will give you a nice gpa to work with ESP if your nursing school is on a 7 point scale. I was one of those kids who was always afraid of blood growing up, but forced myself to get over it when I became a combat medic in the Army. It does take some time to get over it and remember you have to be a nurse first before you can be a CRNA, so you have to get used to all bodily fluids (feces, emesis, urine etc.) along with blood, and should be professional around the patient when you see it and not be grossed out (this can make your patient uncomfortable if you're not professional around them). This is just regular everyday nursing things. ICU patients are ICU patients because they are sicker and require more work than the average patient. When you get into nursing school and are in clinicals, ask for the hardest patients (this will make you comfortable with sick patients so you feel more confident when you apply for ICU positions). Best of luck on your endeavors.
    MeTheRN likes this.


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