Is this job (nurse anesthetist) really as good as Im reading or no? - page 3

by Zagnonian

32,895 Unique Views | 68 Comments

So basically Ive read around 150k a year, 36hr/wk, covered or low malpractice insurance and around 7 years of schooling/training and high demand? Am I missing something or is this job perfect?... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from detroitdano

    I didn't plan on going back to school, it just happened that way. I got my BSN and decided to go further after starting as an RN.

    It's a good route to go, BSN to CRNA. I graduated in my early 20's, got to travel around, get married, enjoy time with my family, and now that I'm a bit more mature and experienced in practice, I am going back to school, will put in the required 2 years, and jump right into a full-time career afterwards.

    As an MD, you dedicate every year of your life between 18 and 26 to school (unless you started at 17, then it's obviously 25). Then if you want to specialize (which I would have), you go through internship, residency, fellowship, and then you find a job at 30 or so, maybe 32. And the hours are grueling. You can't work in med school, so loans. As an intern/resident/fellow, they make less than I do as an RN. So you ain't paying off loans yet, and you don't have the time/money to travel the world. You only start thinking of paying off loans at maybe 30 or so, unless your parents paid for everything for you. So now you're in your early 30's, hundred of thousands in loans, and you had little free time your 20's.

    For some people, they might enjoy that kind of lifestyle. I, however, would not. Some of my best friends are doctors and are at the age where they're finally looking for an attending gig, but I can tell you every one of them is burnt out on the hours and the work involved to get there. Some of them have straight up told me if they knew then what they knew now, they'd never have gone into medicine. A lot of them didn't get to see their children grow up. One of my mentors is an attending, has been for decades, and he even advised me against following in his shoes.

    As was said earlier, there are much easier ways to make the kind of money a CRNA or an experienced MD can make. I have good friends who never went further than a Bachelors degree, and they were rolling in money years ago. Smart business decisions and connections can earn you way more.

    Advanced healthcare degrees are a calling, and I'm grateful for that. I wouldn't want to work alongside people who went the same route I did simply because they thought it was good money.
    Great post!
    Lsmi163 likes this.
  2. 0
    I'm hoping to become CRNA one day. If I start when I'm 18, I should be what, 26, 27 when I've completed the program?
  3. 0
    Is it possible to go through the CRNA or NP program and have a family? I have 3 small children and I'm just now planning to start bsn nursing program.
  4. 0
    Quote from dimov13
    Is it possible to go through the CRNA or NP program and have a family? I have 3 small children and I'm just now planning to start bsn nursing program.
    I know many people who have done it. You can do it too.
  5. 0
    Thank you for the reply, I'm just asking this because I don't know if there is time to have a social life during CRNA school. I'm worried I will miss out on my kids childhood.
  6. 0
    Quote from dimov13
    Thank you for the reply, I'm just asking this because I don't know if there is time to have a social life during CRNA school. I'm worried I will miss out on my kids childhood.
    It depends on the program. But you should expect to dedicate most of your time to schoolwork. Some programs allow more free time than the others.
  7. 0
    Quote from detroitdano
    I didn't plan on going back to school, it just happened that way. I got my BSN and decided to go further after starting as an RN.

    It's a good route to go, BSN to CRNA. I graduated in my early 20's, got to travel around, get married, enjoy time with my family, and now that I'm a bit more mature and experienced in practice, I am going back to school, will put in the required 2 years, and jump right into a full-time career afterwards.

    As an MD, you dedicate every year of your life between 18 and 26 to school (unless you started at 17, then it's obviously 25). Then if you want to specialize (which I would have), you go through internship, residency, fellowship, and then you find a job at 30 or so, maybe 32. And the hours are grueling. You can't work in med school, so loans. As an intern/resident/fellow, they make less than I do as an RN. So you ain't paying off loans yet, and you don't have the time/money to travel the world. You only start thinking of paying off loans at maybe 30 or so, unless your parents paid for everything for you. So now you're in your early 30's, hundred of thousands in loans, and you had little free time your 20's.

    For some people, they might enjoy that kind of lifestyle. I, however, would not. Some of my best friends are doctors and are at the age where they're finally looking for an attending gig, but I can tell you every one of them is burnt out on the hours and the work involved to get there. Some of them have straight up told me if they knew then what they knew now, they'd never have gone into medicine. A lot of them didn't get to see their children grow up. One of my mentors is an attending, has been for decades, and he even advised me against following in his shoes.

    As was said earlier, there are much easier ways to make the kind of money a CRNA or an experienced MD can make. I have good friends who never went further than a Bachelors degree, and they were rolling in money years ago. Smart business decisions and connections can earn you way more.

    Advanced healthcare degrees are a calling, and I'm grateful for that. I wouldn't want to work alongside people who went the same route I did simply because they thought it was good money.
    Just to play devil's advocate, "smart business decisions and connections" are a much less secure path to big bucks than an advanced healthcare degree.
  8. 1
    Quote from priorities2
    Just to play devil's advocate, "smart business decisions and connections" are a much less secure path to big bucks than an advanced healthcare degree.
    True, but if you're able to retire by 28 like my buddy did with only a Bachelors degree, you obviously did something right!
    priorities2 likes this.
  9. 1
    Quote from detroitdano

    True, but if you're able to retire by 28 like my buddy did with only a Bachelors degree, you obviously did something right!
    What did he do? Sign me up!

    ~ No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent -Eleanor Roosevelt ~
    bibibi likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from eatmysoxRN
    What did he do? Sign me up!

    ~ No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent -Eleanor Roosevelt ~
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