Columbia's ETP Program for CRNA: Only allows time for 1 year ICU work. Enough time? - page 3

by futurecrna16

Columbia accepted me into their entry-to-practice program for nurse anesthesia. In this program, the student receives a BSN in 12 months, then has 15-16 months to pass the NCLEX and finish the one year ICU requirement before... Read More


  1. 0
    Hi everyone:

    Does anyone know, due to the very limited time to obtain ICU employment (which in itself is hard enough right out of school), does Columbia assist in finding positions? For instance, some kind of "career services"?

    Or asked differently, have any candidates to the ETP program for anesthesia lost their position in the program due to their inability to find an ICU position quickly?

    Thanks for the information.
  2. 0
    Hi MTroup,

    I had the same question and called & emailed Admissions. I was told over the phone that the school does not assist in finding positions. When I asked if I could defer in order to get more than one year of training, I was told that they could only guarantee my position for a year. However, when I emailed, Jose told me that in the event that I needed more time to secure a position and get one year of training, I could petition for an extension. He also verified that the school does not assist in finding employment.

    I also have an ETP contact who graduated last year as a pediatric NP. She said some of her anesthesia classmates were able to secure ICU positions because of their clinical placements during ETP. Hope this helps!
  3. 0
    No, Columbia won't help you find a job. The people from my class who found jobs in the ICU right after graduation were people who did their integration (like a senior preceptorship) in hospitals outside of manhattan (ie Long Island or Brooklyn). The major hospitals in manhattan that Columbia does rotations with (like NYP, Mt Sinai) generally won't hire a new grad into an ICU. CRNA students from last year moved upstate or out of state. I took an extra year off and moved back home to California. You will most likely find a job, especially if you are willing to move to states that accept more new grads into ICUs (North Dakota, Oklahoma, Texas, Georgia, Florida). Start looking into new grad residency programs the March before you graduate. Good luck! And I hope to see you all around campus in the future.


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