Recommendation for Personal Statement - page 2

I need to write a personal statement for application to direct entry MSN. Does anyone have links, books, or other advice on writing one? I've been out of school for many years - I don't even know... Read More

  1. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from arciedee
    CNL stands for clinical nurse leader. It's a fairly new designation, but it seems that many schools that offer it have direct-entry as an option. I only suggested DePaul as I noticed that your location is listed as Chicago and I know at least one other poster on this board is attending that program. Just throwing it out there as an option.
    I saw that too. Do you know who the other poster is? I cannot find it now.
  2. by   arciedee
    I believe it is Gennaver.
  3. by   Gennaver
    Quote from arciedee
    mvanz9999, if you are sure that you want to do nursing but are not sure where you want to specialize I would definitely recommend acclerated BSN programs or direct-entry generalist MSN degrees. I am actually doing the latter; my degree will be in clinical nurse leadership. I will not have advanced-practice privileges when I graduate, I will basically be a masters prepared bedside nurse, but after a few years the MSN will allow me some greater flexibility in my career. I also anticipate that I will go back at some point for a post-grad certificate to become an NP/CNM once I have enough experience to make a truly educated decision on where I want to specialize.

    .
    Hello there arciedee,

    I am in the same situation.

    Luckily though I was just picked up by the Army Nurse Corps so, in the meanwhile, after graduation, I do intend to begin online courses towards a post master's certificate or possibly even a (WOW) online PhD. I have worked in assistive roles in hospitals and am equally in favor of both the NP AND research. So, currently I am not sure which program I will choose and am searching for online programs that may be applicable.

    Oh sure, there are chances that the Army will foot the bill and put me through either program but, I do not want to wait the several years for that to happen when I can begin online immediately upon graduation, while I am working as a nurse.

    Good luck!
    Gen-six months to go!!
  4. by   susan18
    I agree with arciedee's reply to you. I wrote my personal statement in a similar format, and got accepted to my school right away. Let your heart show through, be sure you state your goals clearly as to why you want an advanced nursing degree, what you plan to do with it, etc. List qualities that make you a good candidate for school. Have someone you like who has been through grad school review your statement. Be sure you have nO spelling or grammar errors in the document. List any computer strengths that you have also, that make you a worthwhile student candidate. Don't spas about it; just do it, and good luck to you!!!

    susan18
  5. by   romie
    Be sure to read the school's mission statement and philosphy and see if you can incorporate some of the grammar and sentence structure into your statement. For instance, if the mission statement says something about developing leaders who can influence complex health care systems then your statement should say something like " I want to develop leadership skills so that I can influence complex health care systems".
  6. by   arciedee
    Quote from romie
    Be sure to read the school's mission statement and philosphy and see if you can incorporate some of the grammar and sentence structure into your statement. For instance, if the mission statement says something about developing leaders who can influence complex health care systems then your statement should say something like " I want to develop leadership skills so that I can influence complex health care systems".
    I agree with this in part... using the mission statement can help you hone your essay. See what they are aiming to do and show how their program and goals line up with your plans for school and beyond. However, I would definitely avoiding regurgitating their statement verbatim. Find a way to say it with your own voice.
  7. by   mvanz9999
    This is a miserable thing to start. I did find some books about writing your personal statement, but they seem so polished and creative and so on. It's a daunting task when the directions simply state:

    Personal Statment: ________________________________
  8. by   arciedee
    I stick by my original advice... don't start with Sentence 1, Paragraph 1. Get out a notebook and just start jotting ideas about nursing. Jot down EVERYTHING! Why do you want to be a nurse? Heck, why might you NOT want to be a nurse? When I was preparing my personal statement I was also considering staying with my company in a new position. I jotted down the pros and cons for both. Sometimes looking at that can help. Just brainstorm first, then once you've had some time to look at that stuff you can worry about the thesis of your argument, sentence structure, organization, etc.
  9. by   mvanz9999
    OK, I've got all the "questions" answered in a free-though rambling sort of way.

    Now I've got to go from rambling thoughts to a coherent, well-rounded, intriguing, eye-catching, unique essay....and this is where I get stuck.

    How did you that wrote these go from pages and pages of thoughts and ideas to a coherent essay?

    I've read a lot of polished essays, but looking at someone's final work is not nearly the same as where to start with your own story.

    I guess....I've got pages of stuff and don't know how to put it all together.

    --lost in my own thoughts.
  10. by   arciedee
    Look through what you've written. Highlight what you think are your strongest statements/reasons/etc. and cross out those that you don't think should be included. As you're looking at what you've written try to imagine what a third party would think of it. Or, possibly, have a third party look at it. If you have a good friend who you trust, ask him/her to look at your list and ask what you think the strongest parts are, the weakest, the parts you could elaborate on, etc.

    This isn't a one-time process. Look at it, put it aside for a while (a few hours or a day or two), go back to it, etc. After a while you should be able to narrow down your list of points to a few strong, compelling arguments that you feel best demonstrate why you, mvanz9999, belong in their nursing program, what you will bring to the program, what you want to get out of it, etc. Once you do that, you can work on organizing and fleshing it out, adding an intro and conclusion, etc.

    I hope this helps!
  11. by   mvanz9999
    Everyone's comments have been very helpful. I'm still very stuck and need someone that advises on these all the time.

    I've answered all the questions, and written down my thoughts, which leaves me with a LOT. 7 pages of stuff to be exact, and since I'm not actually on any admissions committees, I have no idea what to include or not include. Or how far to go back.

    It would be nice if there were an academic advisor or other professional that advises on these all the time. There really isn't much since I'm not currently in school...

    Do you have any ideas or suggestions that you (or someone you know has used?) in getting this distilled to 2 double spaced pages? I've got ALL the answers, I just don't know how to reduce it.:uhoh21:
  12. by   Asherah
    Quote from mvanz9999
    Everyone's comments have been very helpful. I'm still very stuck and need someone that advises on these all the time.

    I've answered all the questions, and written down my thoughts, which leaves me with a LOT. 7 pages of stuff to be exact, and since I'm not actually on any admissions committees, I have no idea what to include or not include. Or how far to go back.

    It would be nice if there were an academic advisor or other professional that advises on these all the time. There really isn't much since I'm not currently in school...

    Do you have any ideas or suggestions that you (or someone you know has used?) in getting this distilled to 2 double spaced pages? I've got ALL the answers, I just don't know how to reduce it.:uhoh21:
    There is an abundance of good advice on this thread (and others) regarding what should and shouldn't be included in a personal statement. I really don't think there is any harm in asking friends, family or professional peers to read the statement for clarity. However, I think the fact that personal statements are weighted so heavily shows us that these admissions committees are hoping that applicants can properly edit themselves and follow any instructions about what to include or exclude (if given).

    This post isn't intended to be harsh, but I think the key is to go with your gut, and use your best judgment.

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