PhD student who is also a New Grad! So Confused! - page 2

by magnoliablossoms

2,772 Views | 25 Comments

Hello All, I am recently finishing up a Entry Level Masters Program and graduating in a few weeks and will be taking the NCLEX really soon. I was very excited to get out there and work, however I received the opportunity to... Read More


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    I have made up my mind. I know that the PhD is presented to me for a reason and I know I am going to try to get experience on the way. I do respect your decision to wait but I still feel like you should apply sooner. Once you get two years under your belt, you should go for your masters. I have met plenty of nurses who have done that route in order to incorporate more evidence based practice and become a clinical leader. I know that is different from your plan, but I feel like you will gain experience along the way.
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    Quote from Tinker88
    Well you already made up your mind and it's your decision on what you do in your life. If you feel you can handle it and feel you have the experience then that's great. I personally plan to work at least 5 years as a RN...maybe even 10 (until I feel I have reached the max experience I want as a RN) before I apply for a masters or doctorate. I want a good solid foundation before I start building. But this is just how I would do it, and everyone is different!
    I have made up my mind. I know that the PhD is presented to me for a reason and I know I am going to try to get experience on the way. I do respect your decision to wait but I still feel like you should apply sooner. Once you get two years under your belt, you should go for your masters. I have met plenty of nurses who have done that route in order to incorporate more evidence based practice and become a clinical leader. I know that is different from your plan, but I feel like you will gain experience along the way.
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    Quote from llg
    I don't think people should teach nursing who have never practiced as a nurse. I feel the same about researchers. You don't have to get years of experience, but you do need some in order to know the reality of the profession you want to lead. It's that simple.

    Find a way to work at least part time while you go to school ... or you risk never knowing what nursing is really like, what it FEELS like to actually be responsible for patients, etc. Without that "practice knowledge," your "theoretical knowledge" will lack grounding in reality. And when nurses find out that you have never practiced as a nurse, you will have little credibility with them.

    llg, PhD, RN-BC
    But then what about researchers in other fields, such as chemistry? They have little experience in their field before they start research. Usually in other disciplines of biological sciences and disparities research, the researchers have no foundational experience before they start researching, which the nursing discipline is trying to adapt to the same method.

    I will try to work part-time as a nurse, but I feel that I will not have a lot of interaction with other nurses as I grow in the research field because I will be focused on mainly research and teaching and finding grants to highlight and conduct studies about certain nursing issues or patient issues, rather than interacting with patients. But I will definitely try to get a part time job as a psych nurse because I do love psych.
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    Quote from mclennan
    The point of research is to gather data to test theories. Research findings are disseminated into practice and policy. The best researchers are those who develop theories and data collection methods based on and informed by their knowledge of the practice their research will impact. Get some practice under your belt to create a credible foundation as a researcher.

    Plus, most nurses are bitter, cynical and clever. We will detect your inexperienced, ivory tower dreck a mile away. When I read published research I can SMELL the academic hack who never wiped a butt or flushed a line like rotten fish. Trust me on this one. Go work.
    I feel that in 20 years the nursing discipline will be different. For nursing research, you do not test theories. Instead you become the principal investigator (PI) over your research and follow the nursing interest that ignites you the most. But I still believe that you do not experience to become an effective researcher. I did talk it over with a lot of faculty from renowned institutions and they say nursing experience is not needed in the research career as before because its completely different.

    I will work but most nurses accept me and have supported this decision. Plus no matter what direction, I think there will always be some nurses that do not like me lol. That's what they warned me of already. Plus I was a CNA for years, so I have had to do plenty of butt wiping lol. But I will work part time, especially because I do need income.
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    I don't think anyone has actually responded to your original question, but I re-read your original post. Go ahead and take the rehab job offer. Psych nursing is a great field too, and my major passion. That is awesome that you have the funding for the PhD program, so please take it and run with it. It sounds like you're prepared and have some research experience, which is good. I think that's an interesting concept of going straight into research from undergrad because it is the expected path in other fields of science.
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    Okey dokey - one more time.

    ELM graduates are at a distinct disadvantage when it comes to hiring. They are just as un-qualified as all other RN new grads, but have much higher expectations. Hiring managers actively avoid new grads that feel that they are "entitled" to special treatment. ELM does not have any confer any additional value in terms of clinical ability or other value for an entry level job. In my part of the country, new grad hiring preference is: 1) generic BSN, 2) ADN, 3) ABSN, 4) ELM.... So, considering the glut of BSN new grads, the chances of getting an acute care job are very slim for ELMS.

    Having done the educational 'thing' myself, I can't even imagine pursuing a PhD in nursing without any clinical experience. A likely outcome would be becoming unemployable with huge student loans.
    MBARNBSN and llg like this.
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    What is ELM?
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    oh entry level masters?
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    Just wondering if you don't mind sharing, where is your program and how did you manage to score free tuition?
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    Quote from dolcebellaluna
    I don't think anyone has actually responded to your original question, but I re-read your original post. Go ahead and take the rehab job offer. Psych nursing is a great field too, and my major passion. That is awesome that you have the funding for the PhD program, so please take it and run with it. It sounds like you're prepared and have some research experience, which is good. I think that's an interesting concept of going straight into research from undergrad because it is the expected path in other fields of science.
    Thank you. I really appreciate your comment and think that you rock for having psych nursing as your passion! I really love everything you said. Thank you again for the positive sunshine!


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