PhD/DNP in Nursing.... what incentives does the State and Federal Gov offer?

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    The IOM and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released a report called the The Future of Nursing... It talks about increasing BSN nurses to 80% by 2020, doubling the number of doctorally prepared nurses by 2020, APN to have full extent practice.. etc? My question is how are we going to do this without incentives? Full scholarships and living expenses to those nurses pursuing a PhD and DNP? What are your thoughts.
    lindarn and sheronep like this.
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    Deleted by llg
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    Not sure what you mean by "how are we going to do this without incentives." My thought (since that's what you asked for) is that people who want to go to graduate school and pursue advanced practice or academic roles will find a way to do it if it's important to them. Seems to me that there are plenty of scholarship/grant/support programs available now. I'm not particularly interested in working with colleagues who had to be paid/bribed to advance their education and careers ...
    realnursealso/LPN and llg like this.
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    My earlier, deleted comment was along the same lines as elkpark. Sure, there should be financial aid available -- and there is. Most major PhD programs already have fellowships, assistantships, etc. for full time students. And if you are working and only going to school part time, you should be able to pay most of the cost from your earnings and/or with tuition reimbursement -- and not need much more than a small loan.
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    An incentive to get an advanced degree? I can't see a reason.
    realnursealso/LPN likes this.
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    I graduated with a MSN in 2010. I went from an ADN to MSN in three years and with grants, the costs was $28,000. I thought this was expensive until I spoke with another RN. she informaed me that she went from ADN to BSN at Clemson Univeristy and her cost was $27,000.
    I am well pleased with my online education. I am able to work in an area that is kinda new and exciting. I learned that I really enjoy research and wish I had the funds for the PhD.
    Education is like most things, if you want it your will get it.
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    Well the real bottle neck in the system if they are truly intending to get to 80% BSN in 8 years is that in areas like CA and probably across the country 80% of new RN's are graduating from community/junior colleges. So those schools simply aren't able to issue BSN's since they are by design 2 year colleges only.

    Now in theory they could do what has happened in my home country in NZ when professions that were primarily taught at the polytechnics (which did not issue bachelors level degrees) demanded higher levels of education the polytechnics paired up with the local university to be able to issue certain degrees.

    So if say a CA community college could pair up with a CSU/UC to issue a BSN then that's an option otherwise I don't see any change soon. All those community colleges aren't going to be willing to get rid of their most popular degrees
    lindarn and SE_BSN_RN like this.
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    Well, I am not sure by what you mean by incentives.....but, my incentive, and my reward, is to be doing what I have always wanted to do. I have my sights set on the BSN-DNP program at Baylor, because they have exactly what I want. I am sure we will see TONS of these BSN-DNP programs cropping up costing double the amount of a public university, no matter where they are.
    chlochlo likes this.
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    The Federal Government and some state governments are offering loan cancellation programs to grow nursing faculty. These loan programs can be cancelled up to 100% if you work as a full-time nursing faculty for 4 or more years. I am a Project Director for the HRSA Nurse Faculty Loan Program at my university, and a DNP or PHD student at my university can apply for these federal loan funds. But they will only be cancelled for fulltime service as a nursing faculty member. I also receive funds from my state government for doctoral students who will serve as full-time nursing faculty in Virginia after they graduate.My university is very committed to PhD study, and all PhD students in all departments (including nursing) receive full scholarship for at least 2 years. These nursing PhD students at UVa all serve as Graduate Teaching Assistants and also receive a stipend and health insurance.Many PhD programs do offer attractive financial aid packages to students who also serve as TAs. But these are more likely at the campus-based programs where there are no prelicensure students to teach.
    JenRN30, rgbrn, and chare like this.
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    Quote from UVA Grad Nursing
    The Federal Government and some state governments are offering loan cancellation programs to grow nursing faculty. These loan programs can be cancelled up to 100% if you work as a full-time nursing faculty for 4 or more years. I am a Project Director for the HRSA Nurse Faculty Loan Program at my university, and a DNP or PHD student at my university can apply for these federal loan funds. But they will only be cancelled for fulltime service as a nursing faculty member. I also receive funds from my state government for doctoral students who will serve as full-time nursing faculty in Virginia after they graduate.My university is very committed to PhD study, and all PhD students in all departments (including nursing) receive full scholarship for at least 2 years. These nursing PhD students at UVa all serve as Graduate Teaching Assistants and also receive a stipend and health insurance.Many PhD programs do offer attractive financial aid packages to students who also serve as TAs. But these are more likely at the campus-based programs where there are no prelicensure students to teach.
    Are you talking about the Perkins Loan, or something else?


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