How Intense are Master entry programs?

  1. Hi everyone,

    I was wondering if current or past MEPN students can comment on this. I was wondering how intense these programs are? I got into 2 different MEPN programs and one school hasnt really commented on the intensity of the program.

    The other school however says this program would likely take up to 60hrs to maintain good status. They also said the program would be close to 7 days a week with both clinicals and classes.

    I'm a bit worried, so if anyone can comment on this please do. I just want to be able to hear the if this is an
    exaggeration or the reality.

    Thanks!
    •  
  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   arciedee
    First off, congratulations!

    I'm in a direct-entry clinical nurse leadership program, started in January. Currently we've got two full days of lectures and two full days of clinicals per week. We have readings, papers, tests, discussion boards to participate in, etc. for all of our classes, so the days "off" are still pretty full. But it's manageable. Of course I'm single and live on my own; for my classmates with partners/spouses and children I'm sure it's harder to balance the different demands on their lives, but so far everyone is doing well. It's incredibly stressful at times (like right now when we've got final papers/posters/tests in our classes), but the nice thing is that you're going through it with a bunch of other people who you can commiserate with and later celebrate with. I'm really glad I chose to go this route for nursing, even though there are times when I question my sanity for doing so.
  4. by   Gennaver
    Quote from lc3
    Hi everyone,

    I was wondering if current or past MEPN students can comment on this. I was wondering how intense these programs are? I got into 2 different MEPN programs and one school hasnt really commented on the intensity of the program.

    The other school however says this program would likely take up to 60hrs to maintain good status. They also said the program would be close to 7 days a week with both clinicals and classes.

    I'm a bit worried, so if anyone can comment on this please do. I just want to be able to hear the if this is an
    exaggeration or the reality.

    Thanks!
    Hi,
    My graduation date is mid June!!! It was a 22 month program with a total of 107 quarter credit hours.

    It is in Chicago.

    Most quarters I had lectures between 2-4 days a week, clinicals built progressively from the first quarter from one day a week to full time, (40 hours a week).

    In hindsight now I feel like it was doable and that the classes were not crazy but, they were. During the first two quarters my classmates and I mentioned that we felt like it was very time intense, and it is.

    A couple of my classmates maintained full time jobs throughout, many did not. Our program allows a minimum of 86% for passing. Our timeline is intense, our degree is an MS, it is intense. Is it doable? YES> Can you just slide? Not at all.

    Good luck!
    Gen
  5. by   lc3
    Thanks guys.

    I got accepted into University of Washington's MEPN program and I really nervous about it. I honestly never thought I would get in (this was my 'Reach School') and they only accept 24 into their program

    I feel like what the heck did I get myself into? Dont get me wrong, I really want to go to Nursing school and become a nurse pracitioner. Nevertheless, I'm scared to death. What if I cant cut the cheese? I know the caliber of students UW takes is really high but what if I dont end up meeting those standards?

    It is such a financial investment and I worked so hard to get here and I just dont want to fail out because I cant handle it.

    I was also accepted into a lesser known school with a MEPN program and the school has not really commented on the time commitment for the program. Nevertheless, I'm sure it will be intense as well.

    I'm kind of torn between the two schools. Should I chose the program that has an excellent rep (that is definitely more challeging) OR the school that is not as well known but I know that I could suceed in the program.

    Both schools have a 100% nclex pass rate and the lesser known school also has many pros to it as well.

    I guess I would just like some advice about my dilemma. I wouldnt be so worried about but because both schools start June, I have to make a decision rather quickly.

    Thanks in advance for replies.
  6. by   arciedee
    I think you need a confidence boost! Honestly, if this school didn't think you were capable of doing the work they wouldn't have accepted you. I'm not sure what your specific application process consisted of, but you likely had to submit grades, a personal statement, resume, recommendations, GRE scores, interview, etc. That's a pretty rigorous process, and when they looked at your total package they felt that you had what it took to succeed in their program. You've got to have a fair amount of trust that they know what they're doing (and judging from their pass rates, it sounds like they do).

    That being said, it sounds like your other option is also good... perhaps it doesn't have the prestige, but I think in nursing the name of your school doesn't matter so much, so I don't think you can really go wrong whichever school you choose. Neither program is going to be a walk in the park. In fact, they're probably pretty similar in terms of time commitment even though the other school hasn't given you details.

    For my school, they also accept 24 students per class. The professors know us. They want us to succeed. They know we're under a lot of stress. We work together (as a class and as a department) to make sure that we're getting where we need to go. They want their money and they want their good reputation to continue, so they're not going to be letting people fail right and left. If you're willing to put in the time and effort you should be just fine.

    Take a deep breath. Think about the two schools and which one you really want to be at. Forget the names or reputations or whatever. Which school gave you the warmer feeling? Which one are you more excited about? Then take the plunge. Congratulations, again!
  7. by   lc3
    Thanks arciedee for your encouraging words. I have to get over this mentality. I guess it doesnt help that I was orginially waitlisted at this school. I applied to 4 other schools and go into the other 4, so it definitely was an ego blow to be waitlisted. I honestly would have preferred to get rejected entirely than waitlisted. Its was like saying that "you have strong credentials but your still not our first choice". If I got rejected completely at least I know that it I didnt even come close and I could improve dramatically.

    Anyhow, I just have to prove them wrong and that I should have been their first choice.
    Thanks!
  8. by   arciedee
    lc3, I see where you're coming from and understand why you feel the way you do. But if it makes you feel any better, we started our first day of classes and someone didn't show up, dropped out on the first day. So they went to the wait list and on the third day we had a new student from the wait list. Literally she was at work one day and starting school the next with no preparation whatsoever. I can't even imagine how stressful that must be. But she is one of the most motivated people I know. She organizes study groups, always seems to be on top of her work (while the rest of us are procrastinating), is doing great in class. She may have been waitlisted initially, but she is definitely qualified to be in our program.

    I am sure you are going to do great.
  9. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    Quote from arciedee
    .... Currently we've got two full days of lectures and two full days of clinicals per week. We have readings, papers, tests, discussion boards to participate in, etc. for all of our classes, so the days "off" are still pretty full. But it's manageable. ....
    This is a less taxing schedule than the associate's degree program I started in. Three days of lecture, two of clinical (plus you went the night before to the clinical site to get info on your patient so you could study the meds and conditions the night before showing up at 6 a.m. the next day).

    I was married with a busy household, a high maintenance spouse, lots of pets and, after my first semester, full time work as a "nurse extern" (spell that "nurse aide") nights.....

    Maybe I should have gone the direct master's route. Sounds very manageable.
  10. by   arciedee
    Quote from chris_at_lucas_RN
    This is a less taxing schedule than the associate's degree program I started in. Three days of lecture, two of clinical (plus you went the night before to the clinical site to get info on your patient so you could study the meds and conditions the night before showing up at 6 a.m. the next day).

    I was married with a busy household, a high maintenance spouse, lots of pets and, after my first semester, full time work as a "nurse extern" (spell that "nurse aide") nights.....

    Maybe I should have gone the direct master's route. Sounds very manageable.
    I'd prefer not to get into that argument on this thread. The OP was asking about people's experiences. I stated what mine has been (so far, I only just finished up the first semester). Each program runs itself differently and I am in no way trying to say that my program is indicative of the overall graduate-entry experience, but I am trying to offer him/her encouragement for his/her specific situation. Debates about the worthiness of direct-entry master's programs would be better kept to other places on this site.
  11. by   traumaRUs
    I think all nursing programs are pretty intense. However, I do think the masters entry level programs are probably longer (without the pre-req time line) than an ADN or BSN program. Personally, I did an LPN program, worked fulltime through that two years, then did an ADN bridge program, worked full time through that too and wasn't stressed at all. I did have a family (hubby deployed part of the time too).

    I think its all in the way its presented. If you go into something thinking its gonna be near impossible, it can very well be that way. However, being upbeat has its positive qualities! (Besides I've found that if you are smiling all the time, people wonder what they are missing - lol).

    Take care, good luck and congratulations to all of you.
  12. by   czyja
    Congrats on receiving offers from 2 schools! Now is your turn to interview them. They want you (otherwise they would not have made an offer) so go talk to them. Ask questions and listen to the answers. Pay attention to how you feel about the response you get. After you do this, pick the program that feels right. It will be the right choice. And, not to worry, if work hard you will succeed.
  13. by   romie
    I have found that my program is extremely rigorous but humane. UIC's GEP faculty have specifically chosen us out of hundreds and hundreds of applicants, interveiwed each one of us personally because they think we can do the work. And unlike other nursinging programs (ADN and BSN programs) they don't "weed" students out. They chose you and they want to keep you in the program. Yes, you will work your butt off and never have a chance to do anything but eat sleep and study ( I haven't seen a TV in months now-- did Anna Nicole really die, what happened in Virginia Tech?) but they are humane.

close