Explain process to becoming a NP

  1. 0
    Hello,I am a freshman in college seeking to become a Nurse Practitioner. Not sure which specialty to go into, but I am looking into Family practice, anesthetic nurse, acute care...I am also a male by the way. I am still developing knowledge about he nursing field, but through more research, job shadowing, etc ill learn more. My question is how long does it take to become a NP? Considering the amount of school, experience required, and the new recommendation for a DNP by 2015.Thank you so much!
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 999 Views
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 5 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    You mention that you are a freshman in college. Have you taken the prereqs yet to get into nursing school? Or are you planning to do the Direct Entry MSN? Or are you already an RN and seek to further your education and become an NP? I ask these questions because depending on where you are right now, there will be different schools/programs that will fit your situation.

    Do your research in the schools that offer what you want to specialize in. Family practice is vastly different from a CRNA. And indeed, there are a vast array of requirements that differ from school to school and specialization to specialization. One school may not require experience, but other schools & specialties will require x amount of paid RN work.

    There are plenty of schools that are excellent and are at the Masters level. There are also a lot of schools that have become Doctorate level.

    Lastly, the DNP "requirement" by 2015 is just a very strong rumor/suggestion/though. After all, it's almost 2013, two years until 2015, and I doubt things will move fast enough.

    Good luck!
  6. 0
    Ok, will do! Thank you so much for your response!

    I have just started on my first year of prereqs. This is my first quarter as a college student. I just really want to be on top of the ball before it begins.

    I'm from WA state, and I have the option to attend UW. At UW the DNP program will be for 3 years, and it is a required degree to become a FNP.

    Is a CRNA program more difficult to enter than a DNP program?

    I need some advice: Is best if I obtained an RN license and started working in 2 years(Associates)? So that way I can earn better money, and have more experience. Or should I wait until I receive my BSN?

    Also, if you know, what are the advantages of being a male nurse, or nurse practitioner? What are the disadvantages?

    Thank you again!
  7. 0
    Quote from indomie23
    Ok, will do! Thank you so much for your response!

    I have just started on my first year of prereqs. This is my first quarter as a college student. I just really want to be on top of the ball before it begins.

    I'm from WA state, and I have the option to attend UW. At UW the DNP program will be for 3 years, and it is a required degree to become a FNP.

    Is a CRNA program more difficult to enter than a DNP program?

    I need some advice: Is best if I obtained an RN license and started working in 2 years(Associates)? So that way I can earn better money, and have more experience. Or should I wait until I receive my BSN?

    Also, if you know, what are the advantages of being a male nurse, or nurse practitioner? What are the disadvantages?

    Thank you again!
    Really? I did not realize that you needed a DNP to become an FNP in WA, let alone any other state. If you have the information to back it up, please post. I believe Master's educated RNs can become FNPs.

    Well, when you eventually apply to become an ARPN, here's the link to the application: Nurse Licensing :: Washington State Dept. of Health.

    FNP or CRNA? What do you want to do eventually? They are different specialties with different roles. CRNA schools usually require at least one year of RN work in the ICU or ER. Some FNP schools require at least one year of RN work, while others do not.

    As to the Associates or BSN: A lot of hospitals are listing BSN preferred; however, ADNs are still finding work. The job outlook for RNs at this moment in time could be a lot better. Perhaps by the time you graduate, things will have changed. It is really your preference. Once you narrow down on a specialty and then a list of schools, you can see what their requirements are and whether or not you will need to work first before you can apply.

    Advantages of being a male nurse? Someone posted on the forum that he seemed to get more respect during his clinical rotations. I have also read someone's post that he was usually the default person if one wanted help with lifting patients. You can search for the threads and posts if you want; there has been quite a few threads about this.

    Search on the forum for advantages and disadvantages of being a nurse practitioner.

    Good luck in your future studies!
  8. 0
    Thank you again for your response. Sorry, I meant to say that UW now offers only the Doctorate degree for FNP. They made the switch to the DNP recommendation. I meant to ask if it's a good idea to get an Associated in Nursing, to get a license as an RN, and then begin my work experience from there. I have started, and will continue to look at those forums! Thank you so much for your advice and help, God bless!
  9. 0
    Quote from indomie23
    Thank you again for your response. Sorry, I meant to say that UW now offers only the Doctorate degree for FNP. They made the switch to the DNP recommendation. I meant to ask if it's a good idea to get an Associated in Nursing, to get a license as an RN, and then begin my work experience from there. I have started, and will continue to look at those forums! Thank you so much for your advice and help, God bless!
    Many schools are switching to a DNP curriculum, and many are not.

    It really is up to you and your situation. There are many different pathways nurses can take; there is no one "right" way to become an RN and eventually an FNP. If you want to get the ADN and then start work, by all means. You can always continue your education when you desire.


Top