Doctor in Nursing, any idea?

  1. 0
    Hi, I am still a nursing student and already began to look days after my RN license. (Hope it is not too early :-)

    I've noticed there are some schools that offer Nursing Doctorate Degree. One of them is Columbia University. It's called Doctor of Nursing Practice program.

    I get some general idea from program description:
    "The degree represents the highest level of practice in nursing"
    "The degree would be conferred in any speciality in advanced practice."
    "The post-masterís program will be two years including one year of residency."

    "The Doctor of Nursing Practice degree will offer a clear credential to payors who increasingly want to apply standardized quality credentialing for all members in all states where they conduct business. Requirements for independent reimbursement of advanced practice nurses will mirror requirements for physicians and will include: standard competencies, certification, scope of practice and a professional degree."

    From my understanding this program is different from traditional research-oriented Doctor in Nursing Science program. And this program has a residency requirement just as physicians do.

    Can anybody give me some more idea as your understanding of this degree? Does that mean Advanced Practical Nursing can practice as Primary-care area and get the reimbursement just as physicians do?

    Also, since degree would be conferred in any speciality in advanced practice., does that mean graduates can practice in any speciality? as nurse anesthetist, midwife, actue care?

    thanks
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  4. 6 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Originally, such degrees were developed for people who already had a bachelor's degree in another field who wanted to enter nursing at a graduate level. The structure of the programs were modeled after programs for physicians and lawyers and such -- in which the discipline-specific material is presented at the graduate level.

    In my experience, most people with such degree end up with clinical training at approximately the Master's level with some additional coursework at a level somewhat beyond the Master's level -- but without some of the theory, philosophy, and research material that is common to most PhD (and comperable) level.

    Of course, every program is a little different ... and each program evolves over time ... so the requirements and focus of any specific program will be unique.

    Good luck with whatever career path you choose.
    llg
  6. 0
    I am currently a 2nd year student in the ND program at U Colorado. What llg states is correct. I choose the ND program because, although I already had a BA in Bio., I would have at least 1.5-2years course work to make up prereqs. for a BSN. The ND program is a 4 year program so I thouhgt I might as well spend the 2 years in a nursing program. The course work is at the graduate level so I've been writting a lot of papers, taking classes in Policy, Epidemiology, Holistic Nursing, and paying a lot more in tuition The ND program at CU does not license you for anything other than an RN. In this program you would need to apply for admission to the Master's program for NP licensure in addition to the ND class work. For myself, I won't be doing this. Look very carefully at what the particular school is offering and ask lots of questions of the program, what it offeres, cost, prescription privs., etc Good luck!
  7. 0
    Thanks for all the information. Now I get a little bit more detailed picture now. Guess everything takes time to evolve.

    rhp
  8. 0
    Dear Gampopa, can you tell me alittle more about your ND program. How did you learn about these programs. Do you know of anything similar? I am looking into Entry Level MSN-NP programs for non-nurses, but I am curious about the ND route. Didn't know it existed. Sounds interesting.

    Quote from Gampopa
    I am currently a 2nd year student in the ND program at U Colorado. What llg states is correct. I choose the ND program because, although I already had a BA in Bio., I would have at least 1.5-2years course work to make up prereqs. for a BSN. The ND program is a 4 year program so I thouhgt I might as well spend the 2 years in a nursing program. The course work is at the graduate level so I've been writting a lot of papers, taking classes in Policy, Epidemiology, Holistic Nursing, and paying a lot more in tuition The ND program at CU does not license you for anything other than an RN. In this program you would need to apply for admission to the Master's program for NP licensure in addition to the ND class work. For myself, I won't be doing this. Look very carefully at what the particular school is offering and ask lots of questions of the program, what it offeres, cost, prescription privs., etc Good luck!
  9. 0
    I didn't know about them either until I started doing research on line for nursing programs in the Denver area. I was looking for a BSN and along the way also found the ND program by hapenstance. I was interested in an advanced degree because I'm interested in having flexibility down the road when my body gives out and I can't do bedside nursing anymore . I'm also interested in doing international nursing with RedCross, UN, Doctors w/o Borders and thought having the ND would be helpful. There's also the potential to teach with the ND. There are other Universities that offer the ND: Columbia, Case Western, most are east of the Mississippi. One problem with the ND is that it isn't widely known about so if I want to work in states that don't have a Unives. with an ND I'll have to do some education. Can non-nurses get an RN via masters work? I didn't know that.
  10. 0
    Hey thanks for the info. I really appreciate it. I am the same way, I want an advanced degree because I want options. Unfortuntaely I am not too interested in East of the Mississippi but I will look into it. Yes, non-nurses with BAs/BSs can get RNs via Masters work. These programs are few and far between and super competitive but they are pretty neet programs if you get in. Most do require a year or two of prereqs but then you go through and RN program in 15 months (4 semesters with no summer breaks). After you pass the NCLEX you start working as an RN but continue on to your MSN part time.

    Quote from Gampopa
    I didn't know about them either until I started doing research on line for nursing programs in the Denver area. I was looking for a BSN and along the way also found the ND program by hapenstance. I was interested in an advanced degree because I'm interested in having flexibility down the road when my body gives out and I can't do bedside nursing anymore . I'm also interested in doing international nursing with RedCross, UN, Doctors w/o Borders and thought having the ND would be helpful. There's also the potential to teach with the ND. There are other Universities that offer the ND: Columbia, Case Western, most are east of the Mississippi. One problem with the ND is that it isn't widely known about so if I want to work in states that don't have a Unives. with an ND I'll have to do some education. Can non-nurses get an RN via masters work? I didn't know that.


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