Can I get in a masters nursing program if I withdrew from a bachelors nursing program?

  1. I was just wondering if anyone has applied and gotten into another program after withdrawing from one? I did one semester of a undergraduate RN nursing program and failed a 2 credit hour class and decided to withdraw. I wasn't dismissed from the program or anything. I got my bachelors in a different field and now have decided that I do after all want to pursue nursing and apply to an accelerated Clinical Nurse Leader program. There is also an optional essay section asking about obstacles in your academic journey and I'm wondering if it would be a good idea to address why I failed and withdrew in this area or to not talk about it all? Thanks
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Shanimal
    Quote from Sl74
    I was just wondering if anyone has applied and gotten into another program after withdrawing from one? I did one semester of a undergraduate RN nursing program and failed a 2 credit hour class and decided to withdraw. I wasn't dismissed from the program or anything. I got my bachelors in a different field and now have decided that I do after all want to pursue nursing and apply to an accelerated Clinical Nurse Leader program. There is also an optional essay section asking about obstacles in your academic journey and I'm wondering if it would be a good idea to address why I failed and withdrew in this area or to not talk about it all? Thanks
    Yes, I applied to two different graduate programs and was accepted into both despite voluntarily withdrawing from an undergraduate program (though not without some Fs on my transcript). My circumstances were a little different--the program I withdrew from was non-nursing, but I went on to earn my ADN, BSN, and some graduate nursing credits over the years with impeccable grades.

    I think the biggest challenge you face is the fact that the program you elected to withdraw from with a failing grade was in nursing, and now you're hoping to apply to a graduate nursing program without (presumably) any successful attempts in nursing courses since. That could be a real problem. Admission committees want to see evidence that you're capable of completing and excelling at the curriculum of the degree program for which you're applying. Did you finish any other nursing courses in that one semester before withdrawing, and if so, did you do well in them? If not, you might want to consider taking a couple nursing courses as a non-degree student (if that's even possible for a non-RN) before applying or adjusting your plans a bit and (at least for now) go for a BSN program instead.

    As far as the optional essay section that addresses obstacles in your academic journey, absolutely yes, use that. Acknowledge your past academic mistakes and take full accountability, but don't dwell on them--emphasize what you've done since to make yourself an exceptional graduate school candidate for that program. Good luck!
  4. by   Emergent
    I see a trend here on allnurses of students who fail a lesser degree, and therefore want to bypass that step and obtain a higher degree. I, frankly, find that troubling.

    Are you asking here if there is a loophole in the educational system that will allow you to assume a leadership position over people who passed coursework that you failed?
  5. by   caliotter3
    Have you addressed any of your concerns with the appropriate advisors at the programs you are considering? These are the people who are able to give you the best advice concerning entry to their respective programs.
  6. by   Mavrick
    Quote from Emergent
    I see a trend here on allnurses of students who fail a lesser degree, and therefore want to bypass that step and obtain a higher degree. I, frankly, find that troubling.

    Are you asking here if there is a loophole in the educational system that will allow you to assume a leadership position over people who passed coursework that you failed?
    Well said and a perfect recap of my view on direct entry MSN programs. Not that those people failed anything but they didn't even try to master the basics. The loophole being they can't get student loans for another bachelor's degree so they opt for a masters.
  7. by   mmc51264
    One you can get loans for a second bachelors and a second masters.
    Two, I had to have at least 2 years of nursing experience to apply to an MSN program-a non-clinical MSN. How does one expect to complete a Masters in NURSING without being an actual nurse?
  8. by   Pixie.RN
    Quote from mmc51264
    One you can get loans for a second bachelors and a second masters.
    Two, I had to have at least 2 years of nursing experience to apply to an MSN program-a non-clinical MSN. How does one expect to complete a Masters in NURSING without being an actual nurse?
    Our local university has a CNL MSN direct entry program. Those nurses are new grads, period. They have an MSN but they still don't know what they don't know just like any other green RN. But the ones I know who have graduated from the program are highly motivated and end up being great nurses.
  9. by   elkpark
    One of my classmates in grad school had withdrawn from a traditional BSN program a few years earlier, and then applied to a direct-entry MSN program. She got accepted. It would depend on the individual school, I guess.
  10. by   gM_2010
    Well stated-how can you be an advanced practice nurse without ever being a nurse.

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