Anyone graduated from a clinical nurse leader program? - page 3

I'm applying to a direct-entry clinical nurse leader program right now and I'm curious to know whether there are any students or graduates of such programs out there that can talk about their... Read More

  1. by   jonesgeo
    OH MY, I'm so glad I read this post....I am interested in finding out more info about the CNL program for students with non-nursing Bachelors at MCG. I am highly considering apply next year and have information from the school but would be very interested in getting a students prespective of the program. Do you work and take classes? I also noted on the website that 50% of the classes are online. How are the teachers?
  2. by   babynurse73
    aren't clinical nurse leader and clinical nurse specialist the same?
  3. by   Sarah Bellum
    No, CNL and CNS are 2 different roles:

    (from the AACN website)
    Q: How is a Clinical Nurse Leader different from a Clinical Nurse Specialist or other advanced practice nurse?

    The CNL is not prepared as an advanced practice nurse (APN) as the APN is currently defined. The CNL is an advanced generalist in contrast with the specialized focus of the practice by clinical nurse specialists (CNS) and nurse practitioners. Advanced practice nurses are prepared with specialist education in a defined area of practice. The CNL and APN roles complement one another. For example, the CNL may call on the CNS to provide consultation when a specialist area of concern arises (i.e. when a patient does not respond to nursing care or therapeutics as expected). AACN, in consultation with a leading group of CNSs, has developed a document, The CNL-CNS Roles: Similarities, Differences and Complementarities. http://www.aacn.nche.edu/CNL/pdf/CNSComparisonTable.pdf
  4. by   Franjcamp
    I am enrolled in the Clinical Nurse leader program in Central Methodist university. I have not seen any advertisement for clinical nurse leaders locally. One of the local hospitals frequently creates positions as they see fit. I hope there will be a position close so I don't have to leave home to find a job.
  5. by   UVA Grad Nursing
    We've had a Direct Entry CNL program at the University of Virginia since 2005. We are enrolling our sixth cohort this weekend. We've graduated 3 cohorts so far.

    Our Direct Entry CNL grads are going into Nurse Residency programs and other programs for new RNs when they graduate. But at most institutions, they are rising more quickly up the clinical ladder than are BSN-prepared new grads. Several members of the 2007 and 2008 classes have entered PHD and DNP programs, and more have enrolled in Advanced Practice preparation programs (NP, CNS, CRNA, and CNM).

    Outside of the Veterans Administration system, there are not many job titles of 'Clinical Nurse Leader'. Our philosophy at UVa is that the CNL is not a job title, but an enhanced skill set and outlook that enables a graduate to be a leader at the point of care in whatever setting (inpatient or outpatient).

    We've had such good experience with the CNL program over the past 5 years that we are launching BSN-CNL as well as an ADN-CNL entries this year.
  6. by   Franjcamp
    Are you done with your program and did you find a job?
  7. by   Trillion
    I was told by admissions director at USF that all California hospitals will be required to have a CNL in each unit within the next 2 years.
  8. by   Caposapo
    I know this topic is a lil daunting and probs exhausted by now. But this is the basic of it....

    A CNL is basically a clinical pathway coordinator. Which will improve patient safety as well as patient outcomes.
  9. by   rnbmc1
    albeit a bit late on these postings....i'm enrolled in an online CNL program and i'm 3/4 done with the coursework and now deciding I may have made a mistake taking the course. I have been an RN for 21 years all of which were worked in a large teaching hospital. The CNL role is taking on a glorified case manager role in our neck of the woods and that's not what I want to do. Also, the course work was heavily focused on clinical aspect of patient care: advanced patho, advanced pharm, advanced physical assessments, H/P recording, stats, theory, research, informatics, health care quality, etc. Now that i'm at the end my capstone project....i'm very disappointed that I didn't pursue the FNP programs and i'm looking to transfer.
    If you want to take care of patients, the CNL role is probably not for you. The CNL will oversee a population of patients to make sure they are on the right trajectory of care. Also, for those of you considering this degree and have never been a nurse????? what are you thinking?
  10. by   newmusic
    Quote from rnbmc1
    albeit a bit late on these postings....i'm enrolled in an online CNL program and i'm 3/4 done with the coursework and now deciding I may have made a mistake taking the course. I have been an RN for 21 years all of which were worked in a large teaching hospital. The CNL role is taking on a glorified case manager role in our neck of the woods and that's not what I want to do. Also, the course work was heavily focused on clinical aspect of patient care: advanced patho, advanced pharm, advanced physical assessments, H/P recording, stats, theory, research, informatics, health care quality, etc. Now that i'm at the end my capstone project....i'm very disappointed that I didn't pursue the FNP programs and i'm looking to transfer.
    If you want to take care of patients, the CNL role is probably not for you. The CNL will oversee a population of patients to make sure they are on the right trajectory of care. Also, for those of you considering this degree and have never been a nurse????? what are you thinking?
    I am considering an entry-level masters without any prior nursing experience for one reason: better chance of getting hired once entering the job market. Sure, many employers may not have a "CNL position" just yet, but since most CNLs begin as staff nurses anyway, would they beat out a non-experienced BSN graduate in a competitive job market because they have that Masters?

    I want to be an FNP too. I wonder if I should go through the BSN then work then try for a FNP degree, or get a MSN in this CNL thing (which could really just apply itself as a generalist bedside nurse with a Masters, no?) and then make the route to FNP shorter after working some years by completing a post-certificate in FNP?

    What do you think? You have more experience in medicine than me. I am a preschool teacher.

    Thanks!
  11. by   Trillion
    I don't have an answer, sorry, but just dropping in to say I'm in the same boat. I'm applying to the CNL program at USF ($70K!) in October but am trying to make sure I'm weighing all my options carefully before getting this deeply in debt. I've been a massage therapist and massage therapy instructor since '98, specializing in pre/peri natal massage and labor suppport and have also done some work w/ hospices in palliative care, but no experience in the nursing field. I agree with you, you will most likely be working as an RN (in Norther Cal this means med-surg or ER, where the need is greatest) prior to working in the CNL capacity. However, a friend of mine who just graduated is now a case manager at SF General. Case management doesn't sound as interesting to me as patient care, though, so I found the post to be very informative from the woman who was an RN for 21 years who now regrets doing the CNL program. Keep posting any findings. The feedback is really helpful.
  12. by   newmusic
    Quote from Trillion
    I don't have an answer, sorry, but just dropping in to say I'm in the same boat. I'm applying to the CNL program at USF ($70K!) in October but am trying to make sure I'm weighing all my options carefully before getting this deeply in debt. I've been a massage therapist and massage therapy instructor since '98, specializing in pre/peri natal massage and labor suppport and have also done some work w/ hospices in palliative care, but no experience in the nursing field. I agree with you, you will most likely be working as an RN (in Norther Cal this means med-surg or ER, where the need is greatest) prior to working in the CNL capacity. However, a friend of mine who just graduated is now a case manager at SF General. Case management doesn't sound as interesting to me as patient care, though, so I found the post to be very informative from the woman who was an RN for 21 years who now regrets doing the CNL program. Keep posting any findings. The feedback is really helpful.

    I realize that CNL is an example of an accelerate route which also offers no summer externship, but am wondering if the Masters earned ups the chances of landing a job after graduation?
  13. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from Trillion
    I was told by admissions director at USF that all California hospitals will be required to have a CNL in each unit within the next 2 years.
    I think the admissions director at USF is feeding you a line of self-serving BS.

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