Any UCSF Mepn Applicants? - page 57

Hi everyone-- Has anyone else out there applied to the UCSF MEPN program? They're supposed to send out letters this month (December) for the interview process. Has anyone gotten a letter yet? Will... Read More

  1. by   czyja
    The online application was a little frustrating.

    I wouldn't worry about it. Your transcripts will show that you have an AA degree.

    Good luck
  2. by   SFtoRedwood
    Hey 007, Yes, so be it, sounds like we are more ready than ever. I feel have learned a lot with the alternate process, like to relax. I see a lot of the 2008 class in the quad up here at the campus, they look busy and engaged, very inspiring to say the least.
    My specialty is Adult Psych. CNS, are you Acute Care?
  3. by   NurseInTraining76
    As a former MEPN, I just want to stress how helpful it is to speak a second language. If you don't - consider doing an immersion program or taking some classes. Doing volunteerwork related to that would also be extremely helpful.
  4. by   NurseInTraining76
    Also, (pardon the separate posts, but I need to have 15 to be able to PM on this site) - your essay really, really needs to show "congruence" with your stated goals. You whole application really needs to hang together, present a coherent picture, so to speak.

    They really want you to be incredibly sure of your choices.
  5. by   NurseInTraining76
    And this is my last post, for the 15 I need:

    Don't sweat the GRE's too hard, I think they intentionally de-emphasize it.

    On the other hand, do make sure you stress your history of doing civic volunteerwork, and try to present this history with as much depth and relevance as possible (2 pages isn't much!).
  6. by   star77
    Quote from NurseInTraining76
    Also, (pardon the separate posts, but I need to have 15 to be able to PM on this site) - your essay really, really needs to show "congruence" with your stated goals. You whole application really needs to hang together, present a coherent picture, so to speak.

    They really want you to be incredibly sure of your choices.
    I totally agree.
    Also, when they say it's intense, they're NOT kidding. Regarding second languages, I'd say about half the class right now speaks a second language, but everyone is very driven and determined- and exceptionally cooperative. We a fun, helpful, cohesive group of adults who are into helping each other succeed - and it's amazing.

    A few other things that help, I think: Know WHY a Master's degree and not a second bachelor's is a good choice for you, and WHY you picked your specialty. Know why the nursing philosophy speaks to you.

    There are a few blogs from this year's class, and if you google UCSF MEPN, you'll see a few pop up (make sure you look at the first and second pages of google at least, because they hide). Those were helpful in figuring out what to expect when I read the prior years' blogs. There's also the MEPN nation blog.

    It's an awesome program (so far). I am constantly amazed at what we're learning and how quickly we're learning it.
    If you're totally sure of what you want to do, then it's awesome -
    and I wish you all luck.
  7. by   TeamRVA
    Ok, so here is the deal. I am going to apply to this school regardless of what anyone here says, but it is always a good idea to get some kind of feedback of the likelihood that I will be accepted. You all seem to be so incredibly knowledgeable about this program, so I am really hoping that some of that will help me out, here! And the more I read about direct entry programs the more I realize how different each one is as far as what they are looking for. Some want patient contact, some don't at all, some want good GRE scores, others want a great essay....


    I want to apply to the WHNP program. I am 24, have a BA in Women's health and science from a school in Virginia. I had a 3.45 for my final GPA. I got an A in anatomy, a B in Physiology and an A in research methods. My GRE scores, aren't so great, V-460, M-540 and writing- 3.5. I have worked at a women's health clinic for close to 3 years, with lots of patient contact, I now work for the Virginia Department of Health as a health educator for STD's and HIV/AIDS. I started a 501(c) 3 reproductive health fund at the age of 19, and still continue to sit as a board member. I am on the national board of the National Network of Abortion Funds, and have a lot of other activist/volunteer experience concerning women's health. My letters of recommendations will be coming from the MD whom I worked with for 3 years at the women's clinic, my anatomy professor who has her PhD, a NP with her PhD in nursing whom was my professor for a women in health undergrad class, and then the other 2 are kind of up in the air... it could be from someone from the national board I work with, who has tons of reproductive justice experience, an undergrad professor who has her PhD and works with reproductive technology theory whom I will be publishing an article with in October, or my current boss at the Health Department I currently work for. I can crank out an awesome essay, I'm sure of it, and I really have the passion. I'm good with people and interviews, so I think that will be ok. I want to work with low income women, and specifically would love to focus on queer and trans gynecological care. Is this something I should include in my essay?


    I just know that this program is REALLY competitive, and I want to know if I even have a shot!
  8. by   czyja
    Quote from TeamRVA
    [
    I just know that this program is REALLY competitive, and I want to know if I even have a shot!
    You bet you have a shot! The only way you would not have a shot is if you did not apply. Make sure you write a good statement - explain why becoming a nurse is congruent with your life/career goals - make sure you answer the questions they ask! Why do you want to be a nurse?

    It is not about grades, it is about the complete package.

    BTW - no offense meant, but posting is bold makes it hard to read.... it is sort of like you are shouting.
  9. by   NurseInTraining76
    "I just know that this program is REALLY competitive, and I want to know if I even have a shot!"

    I think you have a good chance of getting in. Your GPA and GRE will both be a little bit lower than median, but you have a lot of good experience in the right types of areas, and trans health is a very, very underserved area. It'll come down to your essay and recommendations. Feel free to PM me if you want to know more. I have a lot of things to share with you, and don't want to take up forum space.

    You know what you should also do: contact Shane Snowdon, the LGBT guru at UCSF, and ask her to put you in touch with someone who is interested in trans health issues in the nursing school. They would certainly probably talk to you, as this is not that big of an area, and I am sure they would appreciate having more folks involved.
  10. by   haikustairs
    hi,

    i'm another anxious applicant looking to evaluate my chances. i am currently a liscenced clinical social worker and interested in the integrated anp/pysc cns track. i heard this track is getting much more comprtitive. is that true? also wondering how important gre's are and if i will be okay if i only get in the low 600s in v and q?

    thanks!
  11. by   NurseInTraining76
    1) GRE's are de-emphasized.
    2) If you have at least a 1000 or so, you are fine.

    3) I have no idea what your chances are, but that's my program, and there were only 2 of us last year. FNP is the most competitive. Other programs are less so. I think you should just go for it.
  12. by   lananp
    I'm a current MEPN student. Your score sounds great to me, but from my understanding GRE is not so important for acceptance. Personal statement and following interviews are. Be clear about what you want to do and why(reasons that get you to this point).

    regards!
  13. by   haikustairs
    how is the psych track? do you find that you are focused mostly on prescribing meds? are there opportunities for providing psychotherapy(individual and group) at all and what do you think of the placement options for clinicals?
    thanks!

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