Question about R.N

  1. 0
    Hi,

    I have a question. I want to do PICU nursing and I would like to get employment in a PICU. I have a CNA, I most certainly do not have the skills as an R.N., but my question is 'what if the R.N. ignores my input/observation'. I do not speak out of turn and would not try to 'tell a nurse what to do', but I am responsible. I love children. Guess my worry is being 'blamed' for something obvious that I did not do (which I have seen on these boards).

    I know it is hard to get a Peds ICU job, but I know God is good. Worried about the 'competition', I do not compete only care for the children.

  2. 5 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    If an RN ignores your input or observation:

    1. Ask yourself, and the RN "Why?" Do they have a better way of doing it? Do they know something about the patient that you might not? Is she really busy with something and your request isn't a priority? Try to learn from the situation. Example: The patient tells you they want something to drink. You tell the RN. The RN says 'no.' Maybe the patient has to go for a procedure and can't have anything to drink at that point.

    2. If you feel that the patient's safety is being compromised, escalate the situation and talk to the charge nurse about it.

    It's very possible that reading these forums have given you a false idea that CNA's get 'blamed' a lot on all units. Every unit is different. You say you love children. Well let me tell you that pediatric nurses care about their patients. We are very protective of them. If you show the staff that you care about the patients and can safely take care of them, you will get along well with the RN's.
    tryingtohaveitall likes this.
  4. 0
    Ashley,

    It has been my experience that if you 'show a supervisor' you care - in this case R.N.'s, you should be careful. So you did say 'show the staff that you care about the patients..you will get along well with the RN's'. I volunteer at a children's hospital and I hear RN's talking about work 'unrelated' things (not in the PICU). 'You' personally might be protective of your patients, but I do not believe all are. I cried on the CTICU last year because I saw a small baby in their room on thier small bed. I do not 'trust' a supervisor with my tears. And it is completely normal to feel overcome sometimes.
  5. 0
    Quote from lovebug0
    Ashley,

    'You' personally might be protective of your patients, but I do not believe all are. I cried on the CTICU last year because I saw a small baby in their room on thier small bed. I do not 'trust' a supervisor with my tears. And it is completely normal to feel overcome sometimes.
    What about this situation made you upset? Was it how sick the child was? Because most patients in the CTICU are infants, and they are kept in small "warmer" beds. That does not mean the nurses are not protective of them...
  6. 0
    umcRN, I was not upset, I responded to 'how small' the bed appeared (it was Christmas time). Some nurses are 'protective' of thier patients. But if one gossips/surfs internet for all to see/texts in someone's presence without saying hello, that is not a sign of saying you care about someone. If you care about someone, you 'show' them.
  7. 0
    One comment to add, it was my first time on an ICU unit at a pediatric hospital.


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