Pediatric ICU Questions!

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    Hello everyone!

    I am currently in my 3rd year of my BSN program. I just finished my pediatric rotation and I LOVED it! I have always been interested in ICU, and I love children and families. I am planning on working in a medical/surgical unit after graduation to , and eventually work in paediatric ICU.

    My question to you is, what units did you work on before you started to work in PICU? Did you become certified to work in ICU or paediatrics, or both? If both, Which one came first?

    I am required to take a nursing elective, and I just cannot make up my mind between the Critical Care course and the Paediatric Course! (They are both introductory theory) In your opinion, which course should I take to serve me better in the short term?

    Many thanks!
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  3. 7 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I don't personally have PICU experience, but I would probably try to get into the peds course. When you graduate, you should see if there's a spot available on a peds med/surg floor, rather than adults! I'm not sure about in your area, but here, they do hire new grads..and even into the PICU, but something like that course will increase your chances of getting into either area.

    If your ultimate goal is PICU, and you're certain you don't want adult ICU, I say to forgo the critical care class because, while you will learn some basics and some about the technology in ICU, everything is different in children. It will more likely be geared toward adult ICU, even though a few things would be helpful to learn...but you can learn those things on the job If children are your passion and where you KNOW you wanna end up, I think the peds choice is better for you. It will teach you more specifics about children, and I feel like it'd be a better "shoe in" than the other choice.
  5. 0
    agree take the peds course! Much better to have that pediatric experience if you want to go into Peds.
    I work in a pedi CICU and worked NICU two years prior to that. I went into the NICU as a new grad and my hosptial has new grad programs in all three ICU's (NICU/PICU/CICU). Also you cannot be "certified" in ICU w/o experience, you can however take the CPN after two years peds experience and the CCRN after two years pedi icu experience
  6. 0
    Quote from umcRN
    agree take the peds course! Much better to have that pediatric experience if you want to go into Peds. I work in a pedi CICU and worked NICU two years prior to that. I went into the NICU as a new grad and my hosptial has new grad programs in all three ICU's (NICU/PICU/CICU). Also you cannot be "certified" in ICU w/o experience, you can however take the CPN after two years peds experience and the CCRN after two years pedi icu experience
    In general, that doesn't happen anymore. It's rare.
  7. 0
    Quote from samadams8
    In general, that doesn't happen anymore. It's rare.
    This was four years ago and my hospitals new grad program is still running strong, no its not common but if you know where to look and are willing to relocate there are new grad programs in these types of units
  8. 0
    Quote from umcRN
    This was four years ago and my hospitals new grad program is still running strong, no its not common but if you know where to look and are willing to relocate there are new grad programs in these types of units
    Yes, I mentioned this in my reply in the [COLOR=#003366]Is it moral for nursing schools to keep taking tuition if they can’t place their[/COLOR] (nursing students) thread.

    The new grad programs are rare and highly competitive, for they are usually small in number.

    Generally speaking, it's a new reality/world for nursing students and nurses, and people should become aware of it before making the investment in the field. The specialty areas are tougher to get into, and for one reason, it is b/c so much has moved out of the hospital, in terms of in-patient status, and in-patients are moved out very quickly, as compared with 20 or > years ago. The new reality for people going into nursing is med-surg, or (and more probable) LTC and outpatient.
  9. 0
    Thank you to everyone for your replies! It really helped me in making my decision!

    I forgot to mention that I am from Canada, so the certification process may be slightly different.

    I decided to take a Breastfeeding Course for Health Care Providers, followed by the introductory paediatric theory courses (which are part of the Paediatric Critical Care Program I am interested in pursuing after working on an adult/pediatric med/surg unit!) Some friends of mine doing their final preceptorship on a medica/surgical unit at our local children's hospital suggested the breastfeeding course as 80% of their patients were babies.

    Again, many many thanks! I'm looking forward to everything!!!
  10. 1
    Aerielle, I'm writing the Canadian Nurses Association certification exam in critical care pediatrics next April. The information about the exam can be found here: http://www.nurseone.ca/docs/NurseOne...ide_2013_e.pdf The basic requirement is that you have 3900 hours of practice in your specialty area in the preceding 5 years to be eligible. The average annual full time hours of work in most provinces is around 2000.
    Aerielle likes this.


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