any new grads hired in PICU? - page 2

HI any new grads get hired right outta school to PICU if so did you feel overwhelmed? or after orientation did u feel ready? and how long was your orientation? thanks:spin:... Read More

  1. by   marilynmom
    I work in a PICU as a nurse tech in a teaching hospital, I will have been there a year when I graduate in May. My orientation will be 10 weeks.

    Anyways, my PI hires new grads all the time though! Most do well
  2. by   jenj1928
    I just interviewed in a very large PICU for a new grad position and they have a 6 month orientation, I'm looking forward to that phone ringing!!!
  3. by   Ventjock
    Good luck! I hope to find myself in your situation a year from now.
  4. by   cityRNBSN
    I always wanted to work in the PICU ever since my rotation in a PICU in nsg school . I just got out of nsg school a little over 2 months ago. I feel like I have plastered "new grad" on my forhead so all doctors and other nurses know im not an experienced nurse. (I have to say, they really take the time to explain things to you if they know your fresh out of school, they care about their patients especially if your taking care of them!) I am a new floating nurse working in the PICU and NICU. I don't know how I ever got such a selective oppertunity (but persistence paid off!) I had 8 years of experience working in an adult ICU/CCU as a PCA so that may have helped my foot into the critical care setting. Im into my 3rd week of orientation in the PICU and I love what I am learning! I will orient with another nurse for 2-3 more weeks then I will be on my own for 5 weeks and move to the NICU. Organize, organize, organize! There is never a such thing as being too organized. These patients have many drips and medications infusing in multiple iv's, I was overwhelmed when the 3rd day on the unit I got an intubated patient with 6 drips! I managed to get through everything with organizing my report, making a grid for checking my iv rates hourly and really getting a handle on everything a nurse would need to critically monitor, once you see the big picture it gets easier to manage. I think when I first started I had tunnel vision being so concitrated on the iv's or getting to document urine output I dont think I ever noticed everything else going on with the pt It took some time to learn how to be task oriented while still critically analyzing the pt's condition and taking a step back to see how the pt appears, and of course im still learning but these little mole hills I have learned about has improved my efficency/competency in caring for critically ill children
  5. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    Quote from cityRNBSN
    I just got out of nsg school a little over 2 months ago. I feel like I have plastered "new grad" on my forhead so all doctors and other nurses know im not an experienced nurse. (I have to say, they really take the time to explain things to you if they know your fresh out of school, they care about their patients especially if your taking care of them!) <snip> I think when I first started I had tunnel vision being so concitrated on the iv's or getting to document urine output I dont think I ever noticed everything else going on with the pt It took some time to learn how to be task oriented while still critically analyzing the pt's condition and taking a step back to see how the pt appears, and of course im still learning but these little mole hills I have learned about has improved my efficency/competency in caring for critically ill children
    As a novice nurse you're expected to be task-oriented and organizationally challenged for more time than you've had. Don't be in a big hurry to force yourself into a mold you aren't ready for. You have enough to contend with just keeping your care organized and on time and your charting up to date. You should be caring for stable single-system patients right now and working on getting into a routine and a mindset, not trying to match the skill level of someone with 10 years' experience. If you rush your fences (to totally mix my metaphors here) you'll end up being thrown. I've said this before but it bears repeating... it takes at least 1000 repetitions of an activity before it becomes ingrained and natural. If you do 3 arterial blood gases every 12 hour shift, it will take you 333 shifts or about two years of full time work to feel like it's automatic. You can't rush experience, but you can use this time to work on understanding the pathophysiology of your patients' problems and why the treatments they're receiving are chosen. But that's better done away from the bedside, where you aren't being pulled in ten different directions. I'm often up late at night after a shift with a patient whose problem I've never encountered before, reading and searching for understanding. Enjoy this time because once you're not a novice anymore, you'll wish you had the luxury of paying close attention to everything you do.
  6. by   boomerfriend
    I just started in a new grad program for the PICU. I'm totally overwhelmed by the field that I've chosen. We will have 10 more weeks of training including preceptorship with two different "seasoned" nurses. I'm anxious to get my feet wet while at the same time I'm absolutely scared stiff.

    This thread has been the encouragement I need. It is good to hear that I don't have to know everything right away. I'm learning that it's o.k. to be the "new guy" and to ask lots and lots of questions. I am trying to get better at not expecting so much of myself too soon.

    Thanks everyone for the encouragement. I sure needed it.
  7. by   1jazzynurse
    i'm a new graduate and i have been hired in our picu. i was a tech there for a year, so i got to see some interesting things. i've had the opportunity to help chart too and help care for stable patients. i haven't done a shift yet, but now i find myself worrying that i don't know enough as a new grad. i know that no one wakes up knowing how to do everything, it comes with time. i'm scared and looking forward to learning.
  8. by   purplekoolaid
    I'm a new grad in PICU! I graduated in December, and started working in January. I'm over half-way done with my 12 week orientation, but I was fortunate enough to have done a 5-week externship on the unit for school right before graduation. I learn things every single day at work, and I feel like I improve on my skills each shift. My co-workers are wonderful and they never make me feel stupid, and the physicians I work with are very patient and understanding. Right now, I do feel a little overwhelmed with the huge learning curve ahead of me. My hospital has ICU orientation classes for all the ICU new grads, which covers things like ventilators/ABG's, sedation, EKG interpretation, hemodynamics, etc, and it's a good review from what I learned in school. I'm also taking PALS in a few weeks, and then TNCC after that, so I hope I will feel a little more confident after those!
  9. by   LadyQT
    I worked in the PICU for over 18 months while in school. I accepted a new grad internship in another hospital, also in the PICU to begin after graduation in May. I am excited but more focused on passing my NCLEX first time around, given that I need that to start the program.
  10. by   jenj1928
    I just accepted my offer this week! Start in May as a new grad in the PICU with a 6mo orientation!! I'm so excited!(and scared) but deffinately excited.
  11. by   LyndseyER
    where u starting at?

close