What do people find the hardest part of paediatric nursing? - page 2

I'm almost through my first year of uni, and i'm thinking about what area i want to go into. I'm thinking paediatrics, but what do you all find is the hardest part of it and how do you work around... Read More

  1. by   CraftyLPN
    ...parents...how many times can we motion that,by the way?
    I worked in home health with terminally ill kids...
  2. by   bergren
    1. The deaths. They seem to come in clusters. You can go sometimes a year, and then - 3 in 3 weeks. Even when you expect them, and even when you know it is for the best...

    2. The abuse cases. Beautiful damaged kids.

    3. The growing number of foster situtations. Sending a sick extremely depressed kid home with someone who does not love them, separated from their siblings.

    The parents don't get to me. They are scared, have lost control of their child and their life, they are in a setting where they don't know ther rules, or the language.... They are exhausted, sleep deprived, worried about their job and the kids they left at home. They have always tried to protect their child from pain and hurt and fear, and it is all out of their control. We have such an advantage when our loved ones are sick. We know that when we are told the neurosurgeon will see us on rounds that we are in for what may be a 3 - 8 hour wait. And it goes on and on. We know when the doctors can't tell us what is wrong that they really don't know. Lay people think the physicians are keeping the truth from them.

    When most parents go home, they RAVE about the nurses. They remember every kind word, evey face and name.
  3. by   live4today
    Originally posted by teddybear433183
    ...parents...how many times can we motion that,by the way?
    Uhhh....another vote for the PARENTS!!!

    If you can handle the "parents", you can handle the pediatric patient population.

    No kidding......there's nothing worse than dealing with most of the parents. On occasion, you'll have the nicest most helpful parents, but on most occasions the parents will be a pedi nurses worse nightmare...daydream...wish to leave pediatrics for the adult patient. :chuckle
  4. by   Alley Cat
    Originally posted by cheerfuldoer
    Uhhh....another vote for the PARENTS!!!

    If you can handle the "parents", you can handle the pediatric patient population.

    No kidding......there's nothing worse than dealing with most of the parents. On occasion, you'll have the nicest most helpful parents, but on most occasions the parents will be a pedi nurses worse nightmare...daydream...wish to leave pediatrics for the adult patient. :chuckle
    :kiss Well said! Actually did leave the pedi world for awhile, found that to be too physically exhausting, as well as frustrating because adult patients are even worse to deal with--they act like kids, but you can't treat them like children . Another poster made the comment about the lack of control parents feel; I think that's common no matter what area you work. It does make one stop and think, though; thanks for the comments! Hope I did not offend anyone, it was unintended.
  5. by   WalMart_ADN
    the parents...but more so....the lack of parents...the FTT baby that comes in and 5 days later the mom stops up.... the beautiful baby girl who now just lays there moaning because dad got frusterated and shook her.... the 3 year old chemo kid who looks up at you and says.....please don't hurt me.....
  6. by   nurs4kids
    Originally posted by bergren
    1. The deaths. They seem to come in clusters. You can go sometimes a year, and then - 3 in 3 weeks. Even when you expect them, and even when you know it is for the best...

    2. The abuse cases. Beautiful damaged kids.

    3. The growing number of foster situtations. Sending a sick extremely depressed kid home with someone who does not love them, separated from their siblings.

    The parents don't get to me. They are scared, have lost control of their child and their life, they are in a setting where they don't know ther rules, or the language.... They are exhausted, sleep deprived, worried about their job and the kids they left at home. They have always tried to protect their child from pain and hurt and fear, and it is all out of their control. We have such an advantage when our loved ones are sick. We know that when we are told the neurosurgeon will see us on rounds that we are in for what may be a 3 - 8 hour wait. And it goes on and on. We know when the doctors can't tell us what is wrong that they really don't know. Lay people think the physicians are keeping the truth from them.

    When most parents go home, they RAVE about the nurses. They remember every kind word, evey face and name.
    Bergen,
    I just felt this needs repeated. Excellent post. I always try to put myself in the parent's place. We have complete controll of our children when they are little. We have the capability of protecting them..
    from everything except illness. There is nothing worse than having to leave your child's life in the hands of a stranger. There is nothing worse than fearing for your child's life/health, yet you can't get answers. There is nothing worse than watching your child suffer; you are completely helpless. I'll take a difficult parent anyday over a dying/suffering/abused child. A difficult parent is not a matter of life or death. A difficult parent usually cares for their child. The parent that bothers me is the parent that isn't there..
  7. by   kae rn
    I agree it is the parents, but they have that right. A parent is his/her child's best advocate. If you keep that in mind you will be fine. It hurts as a parent when your child hurts, gosh it hurts when your kid gets in trouble at school. Until you are a parent you will never know what it feels like. My best advice is to give the parent some tlc also, and explain everything.....I loved peds, the kids are great, resilient, and their body systems are strong and can recover from lots of things. If you have a passion for it, do it. You are making a difference for our future.
  8. by   bergren
    Since we are talking about parents.....

    This month's issue of Pediatric Nursing discusses: When the Child's Illness Is Life Threatening: Impact on the Parents

    You can view the full text of the article at:

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444200

    Medcape from WebMD is a great FREE resource. If you register for Medpulse newsletters online, each week Medscape emails you on key health news and clinical advances in your specialty area, for me, Pediatrics and Nursing.
  9. by   JNJ
    Nice posting bergren: I vote for you. Pediatric RN JNJ
  10. by   jzkfel
    I don't think parents are your worst nightmare at all, but it is important to put yourself in their shoes. They are usually tired, stressed out, and dealing with major disruption to their home life, other kids, jobs, etc. Like patients, parents need understanding, clear simple instructions and information, and need to feel listened to.
    That being said, I think that many times kids do better when their parents step back a little and let the nurse do his or her job. Kids will often (understandably) whine, protest, and stall more for their parents than for a nurse! Most parents are ok with this if it is suggested tactfully and in a way that emphasizes how their child will benefit.
    One of the things I love about nursing is how much we deal with problem solving. If a family is driving you crazy, if the call bell is going off every few minutes. its important to step back and ASSESS the problem. It's much better to find the problem and deal with it then to complain about a parents behavior.
    I personally think the one of the most challenging things to deal with is all of the friends and relatives who show up, sometimes during 3 am admissions to offer "help and support" to a family in crisis!
  11. by   IRISHBREAD
    I GUESS I HAVE TO STAND UP FOR PARENTS1 SOME OF MY PATIENTS PARENTS HAVE BEEN VERY INSPIRING FOR ME IN HOW THEY HANDLE VERY DIFFICULT SITUATIONS. MY VOTE WOULD GO TOWARD INTERFERING RELATIVES WHO THINK THEY KNOW WHAT IS BEST AND TELL THE PARENTS THAT WHAT THE NURSES AND MD'S ARE DOING IS ALL WRONG. IT IS VERY DIFFICULT FOR A PARENT TO SEE A CHILD SICK AND NOT BEING ABLE TO DO ANYTHING TO HELP. IN PEDIATRICS YOU ARE TAKING CARE OF A FAMILY. I HAVE BEEN IN PEDS FOR 35+ YEARS AND WOULD NOTCHANGE FOR THE WORLD.:angel2:
    Last edit by IRISHBREAD on Feb 7, '03
  12. by   OHmom2boys
    NON-COMPLIANT parents. Those are the ones who get me.
  13. by   cpgrn
    It's definitely the parents! It doesn't get any easier the older they get. I worked with 3-5 year olds and now I'm with 12, 13, 14 year olds - the parents never get any easier.

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