Question for YOU!

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    I was thinking this morning (somewhat of an accomplishment in itself).
    I'm closing in on my 55th birthday and have been in health care since I was 18 years old. In 1969, I was a Navy Corpsman (medic) with the Marines in Vietnam (try starting IV's while you're being shot at!). After service, I was an EMT then a paramedic. Then came nursing. I almost quit the profession until I became involved in pediatrics. My entire life changed.

    Now as a pediatric home infusion RN, I absolutely love what I'm doing. The hours are horrible. Fighting traffic gives me headaches (and increases my vocabulary somewhat). And I rarely have an entire weekend off. But I wouldn't do anything else.

    WHY AM I DOIN THIS (I ask myself)? The answer is simple.. The kids. I have been the grandfather of hundreds of kids. Parents of kids I saw years ago still send me Christmas cards. When I've had bad days and wanted to say bye to it all, I've walked into the office to a bouquet of thank you flowers. That's why I keep going. WHY DO YOU KEEP DOING WHAT YOU DO?
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  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Hi!

    I'm wondering why there aren't more replies yet?? Is it that difficult to come up with an answer?
    I'm a nursing student (starting in May) and I get the usual dubious looks ( you want to go to school for WHAT???) and my number one goal is to remember that I AM good enough to do this and I AM smart enough and it is a rewarding career choice. (been a stay-at-home mom for 3 yrs).

    I have had good and bad experiences in the medical field, solely from the patients perspective so I know how big a deal being a nurse is. I want to be the nurse that makes the whole business not soooo bad. Is that crazy????
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    i work in residential child and adolescent psych. we're a non-profit agency so the frustrations abound with lack of supplies and turnover in staff. the kids live with us for 3 months to 2 years, so the greatest reward is seeing a child get ready for discharge. remembering what they were like upon admit and seeing how far they've come...so rewarding. the nervous good-byes and the big hug you undoubtably get...knowing deep down that nothing else matters because you have made a difference in the life of a child.
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    Quote from StevenRN
    I was thinking this morning (somewhat of an accomplishment in itself).
    I'm closing in on my 55th birthday and have been in health care since I was 18 years old. In 1969, I was a Navy Corpsman (medic) with the Marines in Vietnam (try starting IV's while you're being shot at!). After service, I was an EMT then a paramedic. Then came nursing. I almost quit the profession until I became involved in pediatrics. My entire life changed.

    Now as a pediatric home infusion RN, I absolutely love what I'm doing. The hours are horrible. Fighting traffic gives me headaches (and increases my vocabulary somewhat). And I rarely have an entire weekend off. But I wouldn't do anything else.

    WHY AM I DOIN THIS (I ask myself)? The answer is simple.. The kids. I have been the grandfather of hundreds of kids. Parents of kids I saw years ago still send me Christmas cards. When I've had bad days and wanted to say bye to it all, I've walked into the office to a bouquet of thank you flowers. That's why I keep going. WHY DO YOU KEEP DOING WHAT YOU DO?
    Hi, I also stay in nursing for the kids. After years of home health I went back to my first love...babies in the special care nursery and don't ever intend to work anywhere else. I just absolutely love what I do for the babies. I can put up with the politics, the sonetimes bad parents, and the occasional obnoxious doc because I have the little ones to care for. When I started this job 2 years ago I found my niche. Sounds like you found yours, too.
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    Hi, Melissa. I'm sure there are lots of kids out there who will always remember the positive effects you have had on their lives and will be forever grateful. I have never been in a facility, but there are a few special people in my life who were around for only a short time yet I will always remember how they thought I was worthy of some special attention. They changed my life.
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    Quote from StevenRN
    I was thinking this morning (somewhat of an accomplishment in itself).
    I'm closing in on my 55th birthday and have been in health care since I was 18 years old. In 1969, I was a Navy Corpsman (medic) with the Marines in Vietnam (try starting IV's while you're being shot at!). After service, I was an EMT then a paramedic. Then came nursing. I almost quit the profession until I became involved in pediatrics. My entire life changed.

    Now as a pediatric home infusion RN, I absolutely love what I'm doing. The hours are horrible. Fighting traffic gives me headaches (and increases my vocabulary somewhat). And I rarely have an entire weekend off. But I wouldn't do anything else.

    WHY AM I DOIN THIS (I ask myself)? The answer is simple.. The kids. I have been the grandfather of hundreds of kids. Parents of kids I saw years ago still send me Christmas cards. When I've had bad days and wanted to say bye to it all, I've walked into the office to a bouquet of thank you flowers. That's why I keep going. WHY DO YOU KEEP DOING WHAT YOU DO?

    Good for YOU !!! :flowersfo

    What a heartwarming post.
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    i am currently in my first semester of nursing school. you guys are an inspriration, from just those few short stories i just read!!!! The reason i am going into nursing is because i want to make a difference in someones life, even if it is just one person. i want to make one ill patient laugh, smile, or help them to feel good. I wish to give someone a small ray of hope. i want to make one elderly patient feel good about theirself and make them comfortable. and i hope to do much much more for many people. that is why i am going into nursing. i hope i will do well. thanks for all of your inspiration :flowersfo
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    Because nothing feels as good as cuddling a baby in the "sweet spot" (see my avatar) in a rocker for an hour or so, and getting paid for it. (I do it for free now that I'm retired.)
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    Over the years I've received little cards and mementoes from families of my patients amd I keep them on a shelf over my computer where I can see them everyday. But that's not what gets me climbing out of bed in the dark of a -40 morning and driving through a foot of snow to work. It's those special days when a former patient drops in for a visit all smiling and healthy, - seeing with my own eyes that what I do matters. I don't care that they often don't remember me, even if their parents do, because I know that I will remember them forever.
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    I have been an RN for one year on a pediatric floor and it has been a real eye opener. I have learned so much about th real world and our profession that i do not like. I've had so many horrible shifts and management that only recognizes when you do something wrong or when you refuse to take an extra admission despite your heavy patient load. Why am I still there? Because theres nothing like the child that tells you she/he loves being in the hospital because you were his nurse. Theres nothing like the feeling I get inside when a family tells me "because of you, my child is doing well." I'm even getting misty eyed as I write this post. The day that these comments stop affecting me like this is the day i will decide to leave.


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