PED rotation

  1. I'm a second year student nurse that starts my first PED rotation and I'm pretty scared. I love children but to work with a patient that can't tell you how they feel is going to be very challenging. Does anyone have any helpful hints to help me along for this rotation?
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   peaceful2100
    Like you, I am a nursing student I am a junior and have not had PEDS Rotation yet but I have worked in a children's hospital since May, I have worked in a childcare center for 3 years prior to starting my job at the hospital and I have a daughter who is almost 4. So I can give you advice based off my experience with what I have learned not through PEDS rotation and not as a PEDS RN but as a PEDS care assistant, a previous childcare teacher and as a mother. You will be amazed at the things a young child can do. I have found that a child as young as 2 can tell you what hurts they may not be able to say it but they can point to it. My daughter at 2 years old pointed to her tummy after I was trying to figure out why she was crying and sure enough she was right because she had the flu. The children at the hospital I work at can also point. You have to use a lot of nonverbal with the young one's now with the older one's they can pretty much tell you of course unless they don't want to tell you and keeping it from you. Children are wonderful, Pediatrics is not for everyone and it is not suppose to be just like OR, or ER nursing is not for everyone. Always talk to the child before you do what you are going to do and make sure you are at their eye level. I can not tell you the number of times I have seen others who do not get at the eye level of a child. That is very intimidating to a child. Some Children are also at times stronger than Some adults. Also please remember that children are not little adults there are a lot of people who say children are little adults wrong. Children Can crash much more quickly than adults. Add humor, and play into what you do. Many children do not trust right away and that is good and normal they want and expect you to earn their trust. As far as the parents they are worried but do not let them scare you. IF they see you are confident then they will be more at ease but if they see you are nervous they too will be nervous about you.

    Good luck. Pediatric nursing is my interest as of now and I plan to become a pediatric nurse practitoner.
  4. by   BeachNurse
    Hi, there..I am a peds nurse. Peaceful has given you excellent advice on dealing with children...they can definately be stronger than adults. (I always say that I don't work with adults because they whine too much!!).

    I think that one of the major challenges in Peds is in relating to the parents. Many of them of are terrified that their child is being hospitalized. They may be rude and seem ungrateful toward you--even downright hostile at times. Keep in mind that they are very stressed out, try not to take things personally and always be as tactful as you can.

    My own child has spent many nights in hospitals, and so I try to remember how it feels to be the "Mom". Always always advocate for the parents as well as the child. Many times parents get more worried and angry when "nobody tells me anything". Be sympathetic and try keep them aware of everything you know--what tests will be done, when the MD is coming back, etc.

    Good Luck..Peds is the best!!
  5. by   spburn
    Thank you Peaceful and Beach Nurse for your informative thoughts. It really helped me understand what I need to look for in this particular type of nursing. I went to my first rotation and loved it. I was terrified of the parents but now I know that they just want to be informed of everything that is going on with their child. Just from having clinical two days on the ped floor has opened my eyes to something new and wonderful. I thought that I wanted to go into OB but now I think it may be PED's. Thank you for the replies, they were appreciated.

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