Obese children...my rant - page 8

by Gently.me

14,452 Views | 80 Comments

Ok so child comes in with laceration to the hand. 12 years old, about 5'5'' and weighs 260lbs. Big boy. The MD who was suturing was not his PCP, just there to take care of the urgent task. As she wassuturing, the child keeps... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from leslie :-D
    sad? i truly believe it's devastating, with many being totally selfish, and others being ignorant.
    your story is the protype for all the adults in a child/children's life.
    if they have health insurance, perhaps mandated classes about living healthy.
    it could include (but not ltd to) guidelines to healthy eating, tips, recipes, resources...all inclusive info.

    i'm desperate here, but it's important/critical we discuss these issues (esp w/children).
    i really don't want another thread shut down, because some who become defensive.

    it needs to be discussed.

    leslie
    Leslie that sounds good, and I would be all for it. But frankly my dear, there are going to be some people that don't give a damn (don't get offended that I called you "dear" that was a play on the whole Clark Gable/Gone With the Wind thing)
    RNJHUPHL, DizzyLizzyNurse, and Skips like this.
  2. 0
    Wow, thanks for the story. Sorry I'm late but this sounds so sad. All preventable. Poor kid
  3. 0
    I liked the play "frankly my dear" hilarious
  4. 0
    It is bad enough when parents let their kids eat unhealthy food, but actualy making them eat unhealthy food?
    Ugh.
    Sadly low income families tend to be iver weight as healthy foods are expensive. I know I can't be quite the health nut I use to be on my income, but I make every effort to get healthy foods with in my price range.
  5. 0
    As another poster has mentioned, making home cooked meals usually costs much less than fast-food. I can certainly cook something that costs less than 5-6$ per person, which is usually what things would cost me were I to run to McDo or any other. Also, someone mentioned Aldi vs. Whole Foods. I actually do a LOT of my shopping at Aldi, and love it. I use it to buy tons of fresh produce. I also go to farmers markets, which give you awesome deals on produce and fresh foods too. Yes, organic is best, if you can afford it. But fresh fruits and veggies are good even if they aren't organic.

    I have been struggling with weight gain since I graduated from nursing school. Because of this I have been paranoid about feeding good things to my 14 month old, since she started solids. I made her purees, meats and all. She has an amazing diet, although she definitely loves sweets when I have them. Then at her last doctors appointment, I was told she had gained no weight between 9 1/2 months and 13 1/2 months(she did gain several inches though). Turns out, she is getting TOO much fruits and veggies, and I need to increase her daily caloric intake. Basically, my child is eating too healthy...SMH...Just can't get it right I guess...
  6. 0
    As a pediatric nurse, i agree that childhood obesity is a HUGE problem and it angers me when i see things like an over weight toddler drinking soda out of bottle when i'm out. However, a lot of obese children come from low income backgrounds. Telling them to go buy veggies and stop drinking soda is not the whole answer. It is also important to find out the root of problem. For some its far easier to afford the dollar menu at mcdonalds then to go a grocery store and but fresh fruit and veggies. Im not saying it right and i don't agree with it; but its a reality for many people.
  7. 0
    Coming from India and now beginning to see obese children, its sad, and for me, still shocking in its frequency.
  8. 0
    I work with low-income people frequently in my job. I think it's a myth that they don't know what foods are healthy and which aren't more than anyone else. Schools and community agencies pound healthy eating into their minds as much as they do the anti-drug message. Most low-income neighborhoods have a nearby market or produce stand that is fairly reasonable, and almost always have a few sale items with really good deals on fruits and vegetables. They buy dried beans and rice or other bulk items and I find people from low-income environments actually cook more home-cooked foods because it's so much cheaper than fast food.

    Most fast-food places offer healthy alternatives these days, anyway - especially for kid's meals.
  9. 1
    Quote from nursel56
    I work with low-income people frequently in my job. I think it's a myth that they don't know what foods are healthy and which aren't more than anyone else. Schools and community agencies pound healthy eating into their minds as much as they do the anti-drug message. Most low-income neighborhoods have a nearby market or produce stand that is fairly reasonable, and almost always have a few sale items with really good deals on fruits and vegetables. They buy dried beans and rice or other bulk items and I find people from low-income environments actually cook more home-cooked foods because it's so much cheaper than fast food.

    Most fast-food places offer healthy alternatives these days, anyway - especially for kid's meals.
    People know what to eat. They just choose not to. It's either too much work, or it doesn't taste good. It's not too expensive, it's just easier and quicker to take the unhealthy route.
    nursel56 likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from nursel56
    I work with low-income people frequently in my job. I think it's a myth that they don't know what foods are healthy and which aren't more than anyone else.
    True...almost everyone knows what is and isn't healthy. There is some misunderstanding, like some people don't realize why white flour is not as good as other kinds, but everyone realizes veggies are better than candy.

    Most low-income neighborhoods have a nearby market or produce stand that is fairly reasonable, and almost always have a few sale items with really good deals on fruits and vegetables.
    This is not true of most low-income neighborhoods...have you heard of food deserts? Look at Detroit...there's not one chain grocery store in the entire city. You can check out street after street on Google Maps Street View...find one supermarket. It's hard. Most people shop at the typical Beer Wine Lotto Check Cashing We Accept EBT corner stores.

    Most fast-food places offer healthy alternatives these days, anyway - especially for kid's meals.
    Truth, but going back to the OP's story...it's more expensive! I personally LOVE McDonalds salads. They're really yummy and also low calorie, around 300 each, and they feel filling (I usually put extra veggies in when I go home, too.) However, they are $5 each, and I can almost never afford to spend $5 on any one meal. My budget (as a starving college student) is $6 a day for food. I can't imagine what it would be like to try to raise a kid in poverty.


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