Obese children...my rant - page 7

Ok so child comes in with laceration to the hand. 12 years old, about 5'5'' and weighs 260lbs. Big boy. The MD who was suturing was not his PCP, just there to take care of the urgent task. As she... Read More

  1. Visit  ProfRN4 profile page
    1
    Quote from nursel56
    I work with low-income people frequently in my job. I think it's a myth that they don't know what foods are healthy and which aren't more than anyone else. Schools and community agencies pound healthy eating into their minds as much as they do the anti-drug message. Most low-income neighborhoods have a nearby market or produce stand that is fairly reasonable, and almost always have a few sale items with really good deals on fruits and vegetables. They buy dried beans and rice or other bulk items and I find people from low-income environments actually cook more home-cooked foods because it's so much cheaper than fast food.

    Most fast-food places offer healthy alternatives these days, anyway - especially for kid's meals.
    People know what to eat. They just choose not to. It's either too much work, or it doesn't taste good. It's not too expensive, it's just easier and quicker to take the unhealthy route.
    nursel56 likes this.
  2. Visit  blueshift profile page
    0
    Quote from nursel56
    I work with low-income people frequently in my job. I think it's a myth that they don't know what foods are healthy and which aren't more than anyone else.
    True...almost everyone knows what is and isn't healthy. There is some misunderstanding, like some people don't realize why white flour is not as good as other kinds, but everyone realizes veggies are better than candy.

    Most low-income neighborhoods have a nearby market or produce stand that is fairly reasonable, and almost always have a few sale items with really good deals on fruits and vegetables.
    This is not true of most low-income neighborhoods...have you heard of food deserts? Look at Detroit...there's not one chain grocery store in the entire city. You can check out street after street on Google Maps Street View...find one supermarket. It's hard. Most people shop at the typical Beer Wine Lotto Check Cashing We Accept EBT corner stores.

    Most fast-food places offer healthy alternatives these days, anyway - especially for kid's meals.
    Truth, but going back to the OP's story...it's more expensive! I personally LOVE McDonalds salads. They're really yummy and also low calorie, around 300 each, and they feel filling (I usually put extra veggies in when I go home, too.) However, they are $5 each, and I can almost never afford to spend $5 on any one meal. My budget (as a starving college student) is $6 a day for food. I can't imagine what it would be like to try to raise a kid in poverty.
  3. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    0
    Quote from blueshift
    This is not true of most low-income neighborhoods...have you heard of food deserts? Look at Detroit...there's not one chain grocery store in the entire city. You can check out street after street on Google Maps Street View...find one supermarket. It's hard. Most people shop at the typical Beer Wine Lotto Check Cashing We Accept EBT corner stores.
    Actually it is true. We had this discussion on another thread a while back. I looked up a number of the poorest zip codes in the US and then did a search of the availability of healthy food, including smaller grocery stores and produce stands. Most or maybe all had sources of healthy food nearby (I'm still trying to find that old thread).

    I did look up food deserts, and some info about them. One of the criteria the US uses is that there is not a supermarket a mile or less away. They don't count any other type of retail food outlet. Another study discovered that even when there was a supermarket that close, people still bought the same junk food they did before.

    I know Detroit is like a ghost town in a lot of areas, but the US poverty level is an income of $23,500 or less. This represents millions of people. I just don't agree with the idea that there are that many people who would be eating healthy if only they could get to a store. I can see with my own eyes the large city I've lived in for over 50 years that low-income neighborhoods have small, sometimes ethnic grocery stores, produce stands and street vendors.

    I found this Food Desert Locator and discovered that there are two areas in Santa Barbara that are supposedly food deserts. Since Santa Barbara is one of the most affluent cities in the country, I can only assume the food desert is a mountain with two cabins on it, and both residents are on disability.

    As far as McDonalds goes I was thinking more along the lines of offering milk instead of soda and apple fries (yuck) instead of french fries in a Happy Meal, but you're right those salads are yummy!

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