PCT course and A&P II together?

  1. 0
    So this is so random. But I'm in a situation where i really want to get my PCT certification done over the summer so just in case I don't get into Fall 2013 nursing classes, I can work in a hospital during the fall until I reapply and hopefully get in Spring 2014. The only thing is I really want to get A&P II out of the way as well. Pct is 8-4 M-Th all summer and I was considering doing A&P online. I'm not sure how rigorous pct classes are but I know anatomy is hard, especially II. What do you all recommend?

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  2. 3 Comments...

  3. 0
    I actually have this same exact question except there is no way I'm doing APII in the summer! I was actually thinking about doing APII in the fall and do either the CNA/PCT along with it... Although I keep reading that it's pointless to do PCT since most places hire CNA's and train them to do PCT work. And if I'm going for my Nursing degree *anyway* that by the first semester I would have all the training a PCT has so it's not worth spending the funds to do the PCT.

    Any advice? Ideas?
    How demanding is a CNA or PCT program?
  4. 0
    I am sorry to say this, but it really does depend on the level of difficulty, the flexibility of the professor, and your study skills. During my PCT program, I went to school part time (taking courses such as A&P). For me, the PCT course was not demanding at all. Unlike your credit courses, it is a pass/fail class, so no pressure to maintain a GPA.

    Also, unless you have a lot of experience as a CNA, it really helps to have those certs for PCT, EKG, Phlebotomy, CPR, BLS, etc. I didn't hear back from a hospital until I got those certs. Maybe it was just me, but it looks like those certs help if you dont have a lot of experience. In the summer in will start orientation to be a PCT in a hospital. I am happy that this position will utilize some of the more technical skills I learned in my PCT program.

    Hospitals cannot verify what you learn in school. To cover their backs, they like to see experience or certifications on a resume. This gives them proof of competency to validate their hiring process and avoid a potential lawsuit. All of this depends on the particular hospital. There are some lucky bastards that get can a job as a PCA/PCT right away. Note that the job you would get in a hospital would most likely resemble what a CNA does in a nursing home as opposed to more technical work, such as EKG, Phlebotomy, Foley, etc.

    If I were you, I would take A&P next semester. Your PCT program will take months to complete. Test the waters first. Take a less demanding course first, to see how well you are able to manage credit courses and the PCT course. Good luck to you!
    Last edit by PCTJon on May 2, '13
  5. 0
    Quote from PCTJon
    I am sorry to say this, but it really does depend on the level of difficulty, the flexibility of the professor, and your study skills. During my PCT program, I went to school part time (taking courses such as A&P). For me, the PCT course was not demanding at all. Unlike your credit courses, it is a pass/fail class, so no pressure to maintain a GPA.

    Also, unless you have a lot of experience as a CNA, it really helps to have those certs for PCT, EKG, Phlebotomy, CPR, BLS, etc. I didn't hear back from a hospital until I got those certs. Maybe it was just me, but it looks like those certs help if you dont have a lot of experience. In the summer in will start orientation to be a PCT in a hospital. I am happy that this position will utilize some of the more technical skills I learned in my PCT program.

    Hospitals cannot verify what you learn in school. To cover their backs, they like to see experience or certifications on a resume. This gives them proof of competency to validate their hiring process and avoid a potential lawsuit. All of this depends on the particular hospital. There are some lucky bastards that get can a job as a PCA/PCT right away. Note that the job you would get in a hospital would most likely resemble what a CNA does in a nursing home as opposed to more technical work, such as EKG, Phlebotomy, Foley, etc.

    If I were you, I would take A&P next semester. Your PCT program will take months to complete. Test the waters first. Take a less demanding course first, to see how well you are able to manage credit courses and the PCT course. Good luck to you!
    Thanks that is perfect advice! I don't want to overload it and end up not doing good in PCT for these 10 weeks over the summer.


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