Should the H1N1 Vaccine be mandatory for Healthcare Professionals? - page 20

by brian Admin

38,175 Unique Views | 190 Comments

This is a hot topic, so I thought I'd ask all your opinion of allnurses.com community. According a survey linked below, 87% of the public think we should? What do you as a healthcare provider think? Please take a second and... Read More


  1. 0
    Vaccination of health-care workers against influenza: our obligation to protect patient

    The issue of mandatory vaccination for health-care workers won't go away just because it is isn't a current topic of discussion. The abstract posted below again raises the issue of mandatory vaccinations. It is clear from the poll associated with this thread that an overwhelming number of voters believe that influenza vaccination should not be mandatory. Yet, the authors of the article point out that influenza vaccination uptake is low among health-care workers. Why is that? Nosocomial infection is an established fact with influenza and other infectious diseases. What is the justification for refusing a vaccination when it might help protect frail and debilitated patients in a hospital or other health care setting?


    Vaccination of health-care workers against influenza: our obligation to protect patients
    Influenza Other Respi Viruses. 2011 Mar 21. doi: 10.1111/j.1750-2659.2011.00240.x. [Epub ahead of print]
    Vaccination of health-care workers against influenza: our obligation to protect patients.
    Maltezou HC, Tsakris A.
    Source

    Department for Interventions in Health-Care Facilities, Hellenic Centre for Diseases Control and Prevention, Athens, Greece. Department of Microbiology, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Abstract

    Please cite this paper as: Maltezou and Tsakris. (2011) Vaccination of health-care workers against influenza: our obligation to protect patients. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750-2659.2011.00240.x. Nosocomial influenza poses a threat for specific groups of patients and is associated not only with the disruption of health-care services but also excess costs. Although vaccination of health-care workers (HCWs) has been recommended for almost three decades and constitutes the most convenient and effective means to prevent nosocomial transmission, vaccine uptake within this group remains unacceptably low worldwide. In regard to the pandemic influenza A H1N1, HCWs constitute a priority group for immunization. Nevertheless, low vaccination rates have been documented regarding the influenza pandemic and associated with the onset of nosocomial cases and outbreaks. HCWs, health-care institutions, and public health bodies have the moral obligation to protect vulnerable patients and therefore weigh the benefits of mandatory vaccination. Key effective interventions, such as the education of HCWs concerning the benefits and safety of influenza vaccination, the reinforcement of on-site, free of charge vaccinations, and the use of mobile vaccination teams in conjunction with incentives, should be widely implemented.

    2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

    PMID:
    21668685
    [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21668685
    hat tip tetano


Top