Reasons for Flu Vaccine Reluctancy

  1. 0
    Hello, Iím a pre-nursing student who has a few questions about influenza vaccination for a class assignment.

    What are the reasons for reluctancy of receiving the influenza vaccination by nurses and nurse assistants?

    Would it be helpful if the healthcare facility provided an educational influenza vaccine program that addressed these issues so that well-informed, evidence-based choices can be made by these healthcare workers?

    If a healthcare facility provided a positive incentive to receive the influenza vaccination, would that influence your decision?


    Thank you for your time,
    Kimberly
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  3. 51 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    do you want the answers here or in a pm?
  5. 0
    I'm a newly registered member, so the email function is not available to me yet. I look forward to reading the responses here and feel that the responses will be insightful. Thank you.
  6. 0
    I think a large factor is how "new" the vaccine is perceived. Safety and efficacy are major concerns. Larger scale clinical trial results are not as prevalent as other vaccines. Long term and short term side effects are of concern. My daughter took the flumist version and developed the actual disease. I definitely question safety issues with the live flumist version. Nurses work around immunocompromised individuals and concern on infecting patients is relevant. These are just a few of the many reasons nurses question this vaccine. I also would like to see significant documentation regarding immunity actually acquired from the vaccine. Good luck!
  7. 0
    I have not yet found the time to compare the differences (if any) of the current H1N1 vaccine with the 1977 H1N1 vaccines. If it has not changed, I am extremely concerned about the safety. GB is more serious than it was in 1977 because of the increased potential of MDR infections as complications from hospitalizations for GB. I hope there is significant changes so that the potential of GB and other complications is much smaller now. The rates of complications in 1977 is not only unacceptable to me, it caused the termination of the vaccine's use in '77.
    Can anyone on this board help me research this?
    Thank you, trusted colleagues!
    Last edit by Pfiesty on Nov 3, '09 : Reason: addition
  8. 0
    re: "
    i think a large factor is how "new" the vaccine is perceived. safety and efficacy are major concerns. larger scale clinical trial results are not as prevalent as other vaccines. long term and short term side effects are of concer. my daughter took the flumist version and developed the actual disease. i definitely question safety issues with the live flumist version. nurses work around immunocompromised individuals and concern on infecting patients is relevant. these are just a few of the many reasons nurses question this vaccine. i also would like to see significant documentation regarding immunity actually acquired from the vaccine. good luck!"

    thank you for your response. there seems to be a need of documented supporting evidence of the safety and efficacy of the influenza vaccine for all direct-care healthcare workers to make informed decisions.

    i understand that there are concerns that the influenza vaccine may cause the influenza illness or guillain barrť syndrome. viral shedding by ill or vaccinated direct-care healthcare providers definitely poses a problem for immunocompromised persons who are patients or family members. your point about the significant documentation for immunity to a specific type of influenza is an interesting aspect to research.

    thank you again,
    kimberly


  9. 2
    What are the reasons for reluctancy of receiving the influenza vaccination by nurses and nurse assistants?

    My whole family has received the seasonal flu vaccine. I am a nursing student doing clinicals in the hospital, and would hate to bring the flu home to my kids. Obviously I do not want to take it to the patients either. I am reluctant to get the H1N1 vaccine because I have heard many stories of the recipient of the H1N1 getting sick and testing positive for that strain of flu. As a student I can't afford to miss any clinical because of illness, and if I were to carry it to the patients I'm supposed to be caring for, then it didn't serve its purpose.

    Would it be helpful if the healthcare facility provided an educational influenza vaccine program that addressed these issues so that well-informed, evidence-based choices can be made by these healthcare workers?

    I would probably help those who are unsure, but some people will not budge once they have an opinion on something.

    If a healthcare facility provided a positive incentive to receive the influenza vaccination, would that influence your decision?

    If the facility were to make accommodations in the event of an unforeseen reaction (getting the flu), then I would be more likely to get the vaccination.
    Anne36 and violetsmom like this.
  10. 2
    Quote from Pfiesty
    I have not yet found the time to compare the differences (if any) of the current H1N1 vaccine with the 1977 H1N1 vaccines. If it has not changed, I am extremely concerned about the safety. GB is more serious than it was in 1977 because of the increased potential of MDR infections as complications from hospitalizations for GB. I hope there is significant changes so that the potential of GB and other complications is much smaller now. The rates of complications in 1977 is not only unacceptable to me, it caused the termination of the vaccine's use in '77.
    Can anyone on this board help me research this?
    Thank you, trusted colleagues!
    Here ya go...

    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x9m...paganda_webcam
    NewEnglandRN and Pfiesty like this.
  11. 0
    dear ozoneranger:

    thank you!

    wow! that link you sent from "60 minutes" http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x9m...paganda_webcam is fantastic!

    short version: a 1980 60 minutes interview with a very nervous appearing head of the cdc vaccine program. a must see!

    and still my question is out there. is this year's h1n1 vaccine any different from the last one (x53a) causing these significant numbers of extreme complications?

    if not, this video that ozoneranger found should be required viewing before informed consent for the vaccine

    thank you for this eye-opening report, ozoneranger. again, anyone know if this year's vaccine preparation is any different? we must hope that it is very different.
  12. 2
    It is my understanding that the 1976 vaccine was live virus, but the injection form of the current H1N1 vaccine is not live virus. [However, the H1N1 flumist is live virus, therefore, it is not receommended for those at high risk-such as preexisting conditions, asthma, etc.]

    This H1N1 vaccine is produced in the same way that the seasonal flu vaccine is produced and would have been included in the seasonal flu vaccine had the virus been identified early enough.
    CuriousMe and Pfiesty like this.


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