RN won't give pain meds - page 3

I am an LPN in a small facility. Many docs here order Morphine IV to be given to their pts. My problem is that as an LPN I cannot give IV push meds. When my pts ask for pain med for a pain level... Read More

  1. Visit  CRIMSON profile page
    0
    Always advocate for your patient. Insist the RN assess the patient fully. A patient has a right to pain management. Unfortunately, society and a fracked up legal system has allowed too many frivolous law suits which has painted a terrible stigmata on pain treatment. Unless giving a pain med would endanger the patient (respiratory depression in an already struggling patient) pain should be treated and even then a medication can be found to treat at least some level of pain. I cannot stand nurses who have the audacity to determine a patient is not in pain just by glancing at them. It shows laziness and a serious lack of empathy. This should always be addressed. Patients and families need to address it to a supervisor as well. If a nurse cannot understand and treat pain then they need to find another profession.

    That being said the other side of this is LVN's should not work floors where they cannot give the needed meds. Unfortunately, this limits them to Dr's offices which is now days pretty much all medical assistants. For this reason I believe they should do away with LVN's in all acute settings and require RN's for all hospital/acute type care. These situations put the RN at risk b/c she would need to totally assess the patient and at least the most recent history ect,, and then give the med and followup with in minutes/hours depending on how meds are administered to be able to document appropriately. This puts her behind in her own patient care and places an additional patient on her load for the shift. Hence, one of the main reasons I believe all acute care should be RN only so they may tend to all needs of their patients. In today's society an RN holds an independent license and is responsible for every decision she makes with every patient and is expected to be perfect and never make mistakes and is almost always overloaded with patients that hinders the safety of the patients. Until the whole system is restructured lowering patient/nurse ratios and appropriate support staff be available at all times we will continue to see such terrible flaws in healthcare. But that is a whole other long story.
  2. Visit  HazelLPN profile page
    0
    Quote from CRIMSON
    Always advocate for your patient. Insist the RN assess the patient fully. A patient has a right to pain management. Unfortunately, society and a fracked up legal system has allowed too many frivolous law suits which has painted a terrible stigmata on pain treatment. Unless giving a pain med would endanger the patient (respiratory depression in an already struggling patient) pain should be treated and even then a medication can be found to treat at least some level of pain. I cannot stand nurses who have the audacity to determine a patient is not in pain just by glancing at them. It shows laziness and a serious lack of empathy. This should always be addressed. Patients and families need to address it to a supervisor as well. If a nurse cannot understand and treat pain then they need to find another profession.

    That being said the other side of this is LVN's should not work floors where they cannot give the needed meds. Unfortunately, this limits them to Dr's offices which is now days pretty much all medical assistants. For this reason I believe they should do away with LVN's in all acute settings and require RN's for all hospital/acute type care. These situations put the RN at risk b/c she would need to totally assess the patient and at least the most recent history ect,, and then give the med and followup with in minutes/hours depending on how meds are administered to be able to document appropriately. This puts her behind in her own patient care and places an additional patient on her load for the shift. Hence, one of the main reasons I believe all acute care should be RN only so they may tend to all needs of their patients. In today's society an RN holds an independent license and is responsible for every decision she makes with every patient and is expected to be perfect and never make mistakes and is almost always overloaded with patients that hinders the safety of the patients. Until the whole system is restructured lowering patient/nurse ratios and appropriate support staff be available at all times we will continue to see such terrible flaws in healthcare. But that is a whole other long story.
    Remember that LPN practice varies from state to state. In some states, LPN practice is very similar to that of an RN and they are still useful in acute care settings. In other states, the scope is much more restrictive.
  3. Visit  JSBoston profile page
    0
    As an LPN, are you able to place the IV medication in a 50ml bag and run it over 10-15 mins? Where I have worked before, that was something a lot of LPN's did. It takes more time, but it's at least a way for your patients to have pain relief.
  4. Visit  MikeR26 profile page
    0
    You're right to want to give your patient's pain medication if they are in pain and there is a doctor's order for it. You are your patients' advocate so I recommend continuing to ask the RNs to give them the prescribed medication. Pain is what the patient says it is, not what the RN thinks it is.


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