allnurses | Nursing Community for Nurses & Students - page 91
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NCLEX Advice 2016 PVT, Out of time

NCLEX Advice 2016 PVT, Out of time

by RNinsomnia - Hi there, I promised myself if I passed the NCLEX I'll come back to this site to write about my experience and hopefully helping somebody as this site has helped me A LOT. Hint: If you don’t want the...

Should I Get my LPN/LVN or RN?

Should I Get my LPN/LVN or RN?

by Nurse Beth - Amanda is a licensed practical nurse (LPN) who was forced out of her job in a hospital. She now works for less money as a patient care technician (PCT). Nicole is just out of high school and wants...

Orlando Tragedy - "Why does it bother you so much?"

Orlando Tragedy - "Why does it bother you so much?"

by jaycam - Because a nurse I am friends with asked me why it mattered so much to me... I thought I would share this with all of you as well. LGBTQ culture is one of shared experiences. In the same way that...

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How You Can Lose 50 Pounds In 90 Days

by Surg-OncRN - As a nurse, we hear about the obesity epidemic more now than ever. You see it in your patients and sometimes in yourself. As nurses, we are looked up to by our patients and should represent the image...

Cancer made me a better Nurse

Cancer made me a better Nurse

by VioletKaliLPN - "You have Breast Cancer, it is aggressive but we have very effective treatments." I was 31 without ANY family history of cancer, how could this happen? I began to grieve, I became angry, sad, strong,...

There's No Such Thing As Over-prepared

There's No Such Thing As Over-prepared

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Most Liked Comments

  • 39

    I'm sorry, as a result of nursing school I can only answer questions in an NCLEX format. Would you mind offering me four choices that either all seem right or all seem wrong?

  • 24

    They need a boot camp for management. No breaks, unreasonable patients and family members, ridiculous mandatory charting, 5 call lights going off at once, monitor alarms and bed alarms screeching as well.

  • 20

    I tell my partner that if I don't know the answer it's because it's not an important ailment. She rarely agrees. Sometimes I tell her I'll know more after a physical exam. She seems to fall for that one a lot...

  • 19

    Quote from TheCommuter
    The California BVNPT allows CNAs with 54 months of a specified experiential background to challenge the board to become an LVN. Therefore, one does not need to graduate from an approved program to become an LVN in California. I wrote about the process several years ago:

    http://allnurses.com/california-nurs...ds-763569.html
    That's actually really scary.

  • 15

    I've got a few thoughts on the topic that I think could genuinely be of some help:

    1. Most importantly, I don't think that your chances of employment would increase significantly by getting your LPN via a challenge. In CA, it can take a new grad BSN months or even years to get a job. Most hospitals prefer a BSN at minimum, and many facilities are phasing out the LPN role altogether (although this may be different in community health/LTC settings). Meanwhile, despite your RT background, as an LPN exam challenger your application would probably be at the bottom of the barrel in comparison to all of the other LPNs with formal training, competing for a diminishing number of jobs in a very saturated market. As you have probably noticed, nurses can be very proud (and protective) of their credentials, and you may find that hiring managers have the same response to the LPN challenge as the people on this forum.

    2. I think the NCLEX would be very difficult to pass without formal nursing education. The NCLEX is notorious for framing questions in a very confusing way (i.e. 'every answer is correct, but which is the most correct'), so it takes a lot of practice with prioritization from a nursing perspective. I honestly don't know that you could learn it from a book. Furthermore, much of the emphasis on the NCLEX (and in nursing school in general) is on diabetes and heart disease (although respiratory is a close third). Meanwhile, the topics are as far flung as random psych conditions, to the softness of a woman's uterus in the postpartum period, to random skills-based questions (i.e. if you're drawing up two different types of insulin from different vials into the same syringe, do you draw up the intermediate-acting or short-acting first?) Tons of people study this stuff full-time for years in nursing school and still don't pass.

    3. Finally, I'm sorry that everybody is piling on you for the RT/CNA to RN concept. I work in ICU and have the highest respect for RTs. They are truly amazing at what they do, and I couldn't do my job without them. There are tons of things they know about blood gasses, xray interpretation, vent settings, etc. that I never will. But on the flip side, nurses know a lot of things that RTs don't. I would feel really uncomfortable having somebody working as my RT who had not been trained as an RT, which I think is the concern that a lot of nurses are expressing here.

    Best of luck on your job hunt. It sounds like a really frustrating situation.

  • 14

    Quote from OnOn2RN
    Hahah. I give my husband one of 2 things depending on my mood - a smartass answer or I start a super technical science answer and he gives up. [emoji23]
    When people ask me why their elbow hurts or what that weird rash is, I always answer that it's the hallmark sign of a brain tumor. Most of my family and friends have quit asking me to diagnose them. Except DH. He wants a diagnosis and advice, but then he never takes the advice given. Nothing changes.


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