Transport to PACU - page 2

Hi all. Looking to see what others do in their practice. Do you accompany the anesthesiologist to transport your patient to PACU? I have always done it this way (21 years) and given a nursing... Read More

  1. by   elcue
    Thankyou all for your input. Keep 'em coming! I intend to present all of this, pro and con, to our nursing clinical director. Linda
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    Meaning, the circulator and the scrub nurse????:uhoh21:
    Circulator, scrub nurses, transporters, housekeepers, whoever is in the room. It's a team effort.
  3. by   RNOTODAY
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Circulator, scrub nurses, transporters, housekeepers, whoever is in the room. It's a team effort.
    oh, ok marie, I thought you were saying you had NO housekeeping or other ancillary help, etc, that it was just the surgical team in the room that did turnovers!!!! (minus surgeons of course)
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    oh, ok marie, I thought you were saying you had NO housekeeping or other ancillary help, etc, that it was just the surgical team in the room that did turnovers!!!! (minus surgeons of course)
    We have two surgeons that will pitch in and mop the floor before they go dictate. They are also two of the most respected docs we have, since they pitch in whenever they can.
  5. by   heartICU
    So what does the nurse-to-nurse report include? Just curious. We (meaning anesthesia) take the patient to PACU - the OR nurse doesn't go. They are usually finishing with the instruments, etc.
  6. by   CuttingEdgeRN
    Quote from heartICU
    So what does the nurse-to-nurse report include? Just curious. We (meaning anesthesia) take the patient to PACU - the OR nurse doesn't go. They are usually finishing with the instruments, etc.
    Depends on who your anesthesia provider was! CRNAs usually give an awesome report. Ologists mostly just silently wait on vital signs. My report is more a "nursing" inspired report while anesthesias report is "medical". They tell medications and fluid amt given, what BP and SAT parameters ran..... We (RN's) tell procedure, allergys, relevent medical Hx, urine output, drains, what family is available, any unusual pre-op situations (bruises, loose teeth, rashes...)
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Our ologists give a very good report, that pretty much mirrors the circulator's.
  8. by   heartICU
    I am sure I will probably get flamed for this, but I don't see why reason why the anesthesia provider can't give the complete report. I am sure it would work either way, but to give two reports seems like a duplication of effort.

    As long as you have one person able to resuscitate the patient (and by resuscitate, I mean manage an airway, as that is usually what immediate postop arrests are from) then I don't see an issue with using anesthesia plus a transporter to take the patient to PACU. Plus, if the RN stays in the room, and works to turn it over, they can also open the next patient's sterile packs, etc.
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I am sure I will probably get flamed for this, but I don't see why reason why the anesthesia provider can't give the complete report. I am sure it would work either way, but to give two reports seems like a duplication of effort.
    That's actually the reason we do it that way, to avoid 'missing' something.
  10. by   CuttingEdgeRN
    I suppose it would work either way. Guess it doesn't take an RN to steer the stretcher. Seems most anesthesia providers never pay attention to where or even if a drain is placed and usually has to copy the procedure and post op diagnosis from the circulators record . I guess the PACU nurse could also read it from there. They also have no idea where or even if the family is available. We do have PCT's that can open the sterile packs and basics. Makes you wonder why there is even an RN in the OR at all doesn't it?
  11. by   elcue
    My argument is always that No, it doesn't take an RN to open sterile packs or steer the stretcher. And those are not the reasons we have RNs in the OR.

    But it does take an RN to assess the patient - and family - preoperatively, and the patient in an ongoing manner. And it takes an RN to commmunicate this assessment to the RN in the PACU. There are things about the procedure, such as drains and local; things about the patient, such as preexisting discomforts or concerns; things about the family, especially their expectations and location that are not always passed on by the anesthesiologist, but that most nurses will make a point to communicate.

    I appreciate the feedback you have all provided and will continue to collect your comments.
    Thanks
    Linda
  12. by   roxy48
    Hi all,
    Like heartICU, I'm afraid I am in the minority in my opinion on this topic. I have been working in PACU ( in several facilities ) for over 10 years, and I feel that the report by the anesthesiologist or CRNA is very adequate for what I need to take care of the patient. Between setting up the pt, equipment, monitors, and keeping ahead of their pain etc, I can usually get what I need from my own assessment of the pt and OR periop record ( for drains, local given etc). In fact, I have worked in 4 university hospitals and in only one did the OR nurse give a report. Our anesthesiologists, residents, or CRNA's generally give a good report and the preop nurse communicates the pts family and preop status to the PACU staff.
  13. by   penguin2
    Where I work we get report from the anesthesia provider & the circulator- both transport the patient. I have worked in places where the circulator called report to the PACU & did not transport, which works fine. When we call report to the floors we don't always transport. Getting report from the MDA & just reading what the circulator writes only works if there is good documentation IMO.
    Last edit by penguin2 on Sep 17, '06

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