Who is at fault? - page 2

We have a diagnostic hyster, d&c, and thermal ablation scheduled. No breaks all morning. I have lunch, then asked to give lunch relief. I then have 30 mins before case begins. I am pulling all... Read More

  1. by   ewattsjt
    wow, i can't believe that it went no where or that only two issues of the total system failure was addressed. scary for the workers but even worse for the patient!! while leaving may or may not be an option, it should be considered if things don't change.
  2. by   RNOTODAY
    In light of this posters scenario, I have a question. Say you want to switch employment to another OR, and you are, like OP, are having these type of issues on a very regular basis, and much more. in an interview with perspective employers, it is tacky and not professional to bad mouth previous employers..... but the reason I would be leaving is because of these very system wide problems, that fall back on the nurse, day in and day out. How can you relay this in a professional way to prospective employers?
  3. by   mikethern
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    In light of this posters scenario, I have a question. Say you want to switch employment to another OR, and you are, like OP, are having these type of issues on a very regular basis, and much more. in an interview with perspective employers, it is tacky and not professional to bad mouth previous employers..... but the reason I would be leaving is because of these very system wide problems, that fall back on the nurse, day in and day out. How can you relay this in a professional way to prospective employers?
    Start working at the new place per diem while you continue to work at your other place. Then, a month later, ask your new boss if you can work full time. By then, she won't care why you are leaving the other place as long as you are a good nurse.

    If you do this, you will also get to test drive your new job to see if it is better than your current job.
  4. by   chartleypj
    Quote from mikethern
    Start working at the new place per diem while you continue to work at your other place. Then, a month later, ask your new boss if you can work full time. By then, she won't care why you are leaving the other place as long as you are a good nurse.

    If you do this, you will also get to test drive your new job to see if it is better than your current job.
    In my experience, as well as my humble opinion, systems errors negatively impacting perioperative care are inherent in all OR'S. Test driving a new job for a month may not uncover issues pertinent to that department. Job- hopping might provide a respite from the insanity of trying to provide safe nursing care, but in the long run it just contributes to nurse-burnout. Fixing the system errors can improve the work environment.

    To elaborate further, the answer lies in effective nurse leadership and support, team-building, autonomy, and respect among colleagues. Our nurse administrators need to fix the day-to-day system errors so we can focus on providing safe, competent perioperative care.

    In my 30 years of practice, I have had ONE effective nurse leader. (4 different jobs). The rest have been oppressive, controlling, passive - aggressive, disrespectful, unfair with assignments (favoritism) and my all time favorite - they practice performance-punishment. that is, if you are efficient at what you do, you do more and others slide. Is it no wonder that nurses leave nursing in droves.

    Management need to step up to the plate here.

    Pj
  5. by   mikethern
    Quote from chartleypj
    To elaborate further, the answer lies in effective nurse leadership and support, team-building, autonomy, and respect among colleagues. Our nurse administrators need to fix the day-to-day system errors so we can focus on providing safe, competent perioperative care.
    Pj
    You're absolutely right, but a staff nurse has no control over who leads them. There are differences between operating rooms regarding working condtions.
  6. by   chartleypj
    Quote from mikethern
    You're absolutely right, but a staff nurse has no control over who leads them. There are differences between operating rooms regarding working condtions.
    You are right about the control we have over who leads us. We only have control over our own behavior, our moral, ethical and interpersonnal conduct in the workplace, and this is where every nurse can try to make a difference. When I think of myself as 'powerless' (which, BTW, is a common issue in this female-dominated profession), I am not empowered to practice nursing professionally or collaboratively.
    Nurses working in an oppressed culture is part of the problem. We need to learn how to get to 'empowered'
    I agree, there are differences between OR's regarding working conditions. I believe the tone of the department is dependant on it's leadership. If a leader sets a standard of professionalism, teamwork, respect, autonomy, and collaboration, and it values each employee, the result will be staff productivity, satisfaction and efficiency. If the leader removes barriers to providing safe appropriate care, (all those stupid things that get in the way-i.e., lack of supplies & equipment), nurses can focus on just providing nursing care. When this occurs, the staff nurse is more inclined to feel empowered.
    It takes all of us to create a successful unit; our leadership is paid to 'lead' us, and as far as I am concerned, many do not have the skills necessary.

    Pj
  7. by   ewattsjt
    Quote from rnotoday
    in light of this posters scenario, i have a question. say you want to switch employment to another or, and you are, like op, are having these type of issues on a very regular basis, and much more. in an interview with perspective employers, it is tacky and not professional to bad mouth previous employers..... but the reason i would be leaving is because of these very system wide problems, that fall back on the nurse, day in and day out. how can you relay this in a professional way to prospective employers?
    i think mikethern is giving good advice if you are going to try and change places of employment. it would also be of benefit so you could see if there is a difference in how things are ran at the other facility also (the grass may not be as green after all).

    i believe that chartleypj is correct in the fact that we have to try first. that is the only way that change can take place. within the same token, if change does not occur; another place may be a better fit.

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