What's up with RNs who refuse to scrub? - page 8

This trend, at least in the Western states, is starting to irritate me more and more, the more I see it. I have been an OR nurse for over 20 years; scrub and circulate all areas; have done all kinds... Read More

  1. by   stevierae
    Margo, there are different schools of thought on this one--Shodobe's thoughts may be different than mine, so watch for his reply too--in fact, everybody here can offer you insight as to what worked for them.

    I, personally, think every new grad should have a year's worth of med surg experience--just to gain experience in the fundamentals that you learned in nursing school--drawing up meds, setting priorities, charting, etc.

    Did I do it? No, because I had floor experience in the Navy as a corpsman, as well as having gone to operating room technician school there and working independent duty in the E.R. for 3 years.

    Do I think YOU need a year's worth of med-surg experience? Maybe not--depending on where you have worked as an LPN--your fundamental nursing skills may already be state of the art.

    In fact, if you can get into that Denver operating room nursing program that teaches new grads to scrub and circulate, right after graduation, AND you are already comfortable with your basic nursing skills, DO IT!!! Why waste a year slaving away on med surg if you can be training to do what you really want to do anyway, and geting paid for it, to boot! Keep in mind that they MAY want you to sign an agreement that you will stay working for them for at least one year after they train you--but it may be a great place , and you wil end up staying happily for a year or two--then taking off to do travel assignments--

    Best assignments to take first? Probably those affiliated with major medical centers--simply because there are always plenty of surgical residents around who are also learnig--thus, the surgeries are somewhat slow--and the residents are always willing to help the circualtor do whatever needs doing--in fact, sometimes they are TOOO helpful, LOL, and they kinda get in your way--you don't feel overwhelmed, because you aren't expected to do EVERYTHING--

    At these places, there are also sometimes private PAs or RNFAs woho work with the specialty surgeons--they are really lifesavers in helping with things like positioning, balancing microscopes, settign up fracture tables, etc.--and, as long as you are willing to learn from them, they will share whatever they know--

    I would stay away, at least for a while, from university trauma center travel assignments--or those that do huge, complicated neuro or oncology cases--I think you will probably need 5 years of all around scrubbing and circulating experience, and taking call, to feel comfortable with the fast pace required of trauma, especially--

    Shodobe, your thoughts?
    Last edit by stevierae on Feb 1, '04
  2. by   Muggle1
    Thanks for getting back to me so soon Stevierae!!! It's nice having some contact with someone who's doing exactly what I want to do!
  3. by   Ferret
    G'day All,

    Thanks for your reponses, very interesting. Have no fear, I'm not going anywhere without a substantial amount of scrub experience.. I haven't waited for EVER to scrub to start shifting before I have done it for a while.

    As for new grad programmes, I've been an Enrolled nurse since 1995, working on the wards, and started theatres in January 1999. As such, I'd decided not to do a Newgrad course, but immediately do a Postgrad course in theatres, specialising straight away.

    I understand that the role of a registered nurse and an enrolled nurse are substantially different, and this may affect my understanding of medication admin and other ward stuff, but my Uni time in the wards gave me enough grief... I wanted back into theatres!!!!! I've been told by my new hospital that they want me to do the components of the new grad course anyway, so I'll end up doing both courses simultaneously and get more study days!

    As well, I'm joining the Royal Australian Air Force Active Reserves (RAAFAR) as an RN, so will be doing some things to broaden my experience there.

    In short, my advice on the subject is, if you want to do something, GO FOR IT! You never know until you try.

    Have fun! Jason 8^)
  4. by   Junebug59
    :angryfire [font=Arial Black]people like you make me sick. you think you are so great!! when in reality you probably are the worst o.r. nurse. no one gives a rat's @## that you are so great. some nurses may just want to do circulating it doesn't mean the lack the greatness you pocess. i was a tech for 11 yr and have been a r.n. in the o.r. for 14. the nurses that don't want to scrub just gives me more chance to scrub. i am still a scrub tech at heart.
    Quote from ITSJUSTMEZOE
    It depends on the area and the facility if I scrub or not , being a Traveler they really rather have me circulating the room only because they are paying me much higher rates then what thier scrubs get and Im versital enough I can go into any room into the OR and circulate or scrub in it. I can scrub any case need be , I cant say I will be as fast as the scrub is because they scrub constantly, but I wont sit and ponder what the Dr is asking for either. I have many cases first assisted and love it I love being in the middle of things and it being a madhouse. I thrive on it, I love trauma and I can pop down to the ER with any Dr and do what needs to be done , but most places wont allow that because its not Good Management to have an Rn down there when a scrub is sufficant. Thats what I have been told I personally think its a crock of crap but I dont make the rules. The majority of the hospitals dont have their Rns scrubbing anymore , but dont think for a minute those nurses dont know whats going on in that room, I have worked with many that can not look up and hand suture thats going to be needed in 3 minutes or less and they not once look at whats going on in the case , they know thier cases that well.
    I have been called to a room to set up or open a case and I usually send a scrub for a break and when they enter their rooms are cracked and thier mayo set up and Im scrubbed in setting the instruments up , It keeps me in tune with whats on the table and whats needed. I make sure my scrubs are taken care of. I have scrubbed in on a many of cases as well , and have the Dr almost faint because an Rn is scrubbed in and it not be a Heart we are doing. I dont particularly like scrubbing in on a Lap Chole they bore me , but I will do it, IF SOMEONE IN MANAGEMENT WILL LET ME, but Im not clueless when it comes to circulating any rooms what so ever. I could care less if I scrub or not , It makes no difference to me , I can function at either roll and not give a rats behind about it. They pay me to do a job and whatever they see fit for me to do is what I do. Yes I think it would be nice for new Rns to see how it is to scrub that way the scrubs recieve the respect they deserve, because its not always fun and games up on that table. It would be nice to have a world where things are done correctly , but in the Nursing world we are far from correct on many issues. As far as the well rounded issue: I think all Rns in the OR need floor experience , but thats my opinion, Nothing like getting a fresh one off the boards thats clueless on how things work on the floors as well. When I was trained for the OR I had 3 yrs Cardiac/Med -Surg floor experience , and I was amazed at what went on in the OR the Heart surgeon I worked with chose his team and me and 4 others from my floor learned the hard way on the care given and taken by theses patients. We went from the cardiac med surg to the CVICU and were cross trained then down to the OR , and was trained on every aspect of the cases. It didnt matter if it was a gen,gyn,uro,neuro ,ortho , plastics or a Heart were were in the middle of it . So why is it that heart nurses only do hearts anymore??? Its the same standards as any other cases but very seldom do you see a Heart Nurse or scrubb in any rooms down the hall???Are they too good for it? I just love to hear them whine about it, and it makes me ill. I dont knock Nurses who dont scrub its thier choice and when and if they feel comfortable to scrub they will but someone will have to allow them the chance to do it and the way ORs are staffed nowdays I dont see them being able to.
    My 2 cents
    Zoe
  5. by   shodobe
    Hey beans, get a life! Who cares if you are a scrub tech or an RN. As far as I am concerned a tech is a one dimensional person. Only good for one thing. If you can't be a little less hostile, go somewhere else to vent. Maybe you can find a tech forum to troll. It sure would be better for you since your opinion, as meaningless as it is, is not welcomed here. Also don't make rash judgements on a person's ability, you don't know them and have no idea what kind of nurse they are. We could make the same judgement on you and rip you another one in the skills area. If you are such a "tech" person, then why did you become an RN and why didn't you just stay a "tech"? To mimic you own words, "people like you make me sick", just what kind of people are you refering to? If your not careful your posts may not number beyond "2". Go ahead make my day and reply. Mike
    Hey stevierae, get a load of this guy or gal
  6. by   stevierae
    Quote from shodobe
    Hey beans, get a life! Who cares if you are a scrub tech or an RN. As far as I am concerned a tech is a one dimensional person. Only good for one thing. If you can't be a little less hostile, go somewhere else to vent. Maybe you can find a tech forum to troll. It sure would be better for you since your opinion, as meaningless as it is, is not welcomed here. Also don't make rash judgements on a person's ability, you don't know them and have no idea what kind of nurse they are. We could make the same judgement on you and rip you another one in the skills area. If you are such a "tech" person, then why did you become an RN and why didn't you just stay a "tech"? To mimic you own words, "people like you make me sick", just what kind of people are you refering to? If your not careful your posts may not number beyond "2". Go ahead make my day and reply. Mike
    Hey stevierae, get a load of this guy or gal
    Per beans:

    "people like you make me sick. you think you are so great!! when in reality you probably are the worst o.r. nurse. no one gives a rat's @## that you are so great. some nurses may just want to do circulating it doesn't mean the lack the greatness you pocess. i was a tech for 11 yr and have been a r.n. in the o.r. for 14. the nurses that don't want to scrub just gives me more chance to scrub. i am still a scrub tech at heart."

    Beans, I really think that you should take some classes in basic English--that is, grammar, spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure. Quite frankly, I do not believe that you are an operating room nurse--you just don't come across as credible.
    Last edit by stevierae on Feb 27, '04
  7. by   Ferret
    Hi All,

    I have to agree with Shodobe and Stevierae on this one,

    beans, GET A LIFE!

    I believe this forum is for professional nuses, the redneck forums are elsewhere.... Anyone who has as much nursing experience as you claim should have learnt how to be polite to their colleagues and how to write legible reports. Try "flaming" :angryfire people on other sites, it is extremely unprofessional be publicly rude to other nurses... we have enough patients and doctors to do that without putting up with it from our colleagues as well. Please keep your aggression to yourself or go elsewhere.

    BYE!
  8. by   shodobe
    Quote from Ferret
    Hi All,

    I have to agree with Shodobe and Stevierae on this one,

    beans, GET A LIFE!

    I believe this forum is for professional nuses, the redneck forums are elsewhere.... Anyone who has as much nursing experience as you claim should have learnt how to be polite to their colleagues and how to write legible reports. Try "flaming" :angryfire people on other sites, it is extremely unprofessional be publicly rude to other nurses... we have enough patients and doctors to do that without putting up with it from our colleagues as well. Please keep your aggression to yourself or go elsewhere.

    BYE!
    This guy must be consulting a dictionary so he can get the words right for a reply. We have enough problems in the ranks to have a fool like this "butt" in! I would hope this is a guy because it would bother me that a lady would be so rude over something as trivial as this is. I can bet this "guy" is a 44 year old, ex-military corpman, who thinks he is better than anyone else because of his time spent in the military. I have found this is a characteristic of most, not all, ex-military people. They were allowed to do alot in the military and feel they should be able to do the same thing on the "outside" without the benefit of further education or credentialing. Some of the best, I should explain myself before being flamed, nurses I have worked with in the past 20 years are ex-military and have exceptional skills. I am not saying this jerk is ex-military, but one wonders because of his 11 years as a "tech". Ferret, I need to find out where my wife's friends live "downunder". One lives outside of Melbourne and the other is a Kiwi outside of Wellington. G'day mate, Mike
  9. by   stevierae
    Quote from shodobe
    This guy must be consulting a dictionary so he can get the words right for a reply. We have enough problems in the ranks to have a fool like this "butt" in! I would hope this is a guy because it would bother me that a lady would be so rude over something as trivial as this is. I can bet this "guy" is a 44 year old, ex-military corpman, who thinks he is better than anyone else because of his time spent in the military. I have found this is a characteristic of most, not all, ex-military people. They were allowed to do alot in the military and feel they should be able to do the same thing on the "outside" without the benefit of further education or credentialing. Some of the best, I should explain myself before being flamed, nurses I have worked with in the past 20 years are ex-military and have exceptional skills. I am not saying this jerk is ex-military, but one wonders because of his 11 years as a "tech". Ferret, I need to find out where my wife's friends live "downunder". One lives outside of Melbourne and the other is a Kiwi outside of Wellington. G'day mate, Mike
    I'm an ex-military copsman, Vietnam era--but I do not have the attitude. You are right, Shodobe, there are those that do--but I have to say that the ex-military corpsmen I have worked with, for the most part, are the best PAs, techs and nurses.
  10. by   shodobe
    You are right stevierae, the majority of them are exceptional and very few are the opposite. You will also find this in the group that transitioned from Paramedics to nursing. I think you will find this in all groups no matter what and will find the "bad apples" that give everyone a bad taste in their mouth. Don't judge to hasty on anyone. Mike
  11. by   Ferret
    He, HE, I'm going through the recruitment process now, does that make me a soon-to-be ex-military corpsman?

    I find that the military mindset can encompass any personalities, but they have a special place for real a-holes - is it boot instructor or drill sgt? I can't remember. However, the armed forces seem to attract aggresive personalities, and in my experience, aggro people = pain in the a**.

    Mike, I'm in Sydney, PM me and I'll see about tracking those people down. Jason 8^)

    ps. contrary to popular opinion, New Zealand is a country in it's own right, not an island off our shores. Although they do refer to us as "the mainland".. but I'll see what I can do. JJ

    pps. Where did you want their bodies? JJH :uhoh21:
    Last edit by Ferret on Mar 1, '04 : Reason: oops - spelling
  12. by   Ferret
    Mike, try

    http://www.schoolfriends.com.au/

    It's where I'd start looking for people here.
  13. by   Ferret
    Can't bear seeing this thread dissapear....

    I'm starting to scrub for some pretty major cases now and loving every second. I was a scout nurse for four years, and felt I was missing a large part of our work by not scrubbing. The strength of the perioperative nurse is in our flexibility, we are selling ourselves, and nursing as a whole, short if we do not scrub. I can't imagine what it is like for you guys with surgical technicians, but here we will fight to keep the RN scrubbing and circulating and anaesthetics if possible... although we are losing THAT battle.

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