Wanting to transition to OR/PLEASE reply :(

  1. 0
    Hi

    I've been a nurse for 9 mos on a med/surg floor.
    I love the floor and the people i work with. I HATE working nights.
    I recently been applying to OR positions. Many years ago I was a dental assistant and loved setting up the room, disinfecting/sterilization and assisting the dentist. I can see myself in an OR.

    I realize a lot of it is circulating , but I want to get my CNOR and RNFA so I can do more assisting and less circulating. I want to be up close and personal with the blood and guts. I feel like that is what I was born for. Am I crazy for doing this? I have zero periop experience. But the more I go to my current job the more I long for this dream.

    Especially the last two shift I worked were less then desirable, I got kicked twice by patient that was AOx1 and had a pt fall, when I was alerted to this, my anxiety level went through the roof, even though all the proper precautions were in place, aside from me staying the room my entire shift.

    When I'm off this is all I think about, this change. Not to mention, I'm exhausted my days off from being on night shift. Tell me I'm not crazy, please, and there is hope. I just don't want to regret leaving the bedside. I want to go to graduate school too, eventually. I know as an RNFA I can go to graduate school, but does that limit my opportunities after? Are there many opportunities for OR nurses or RNFA's with a master?
    Thanks for listening to this unhappy nurse
  2. 2,706 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 9 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I've only been in the OR for 2yrs, coming from a med-surg background. The OR is much better then the floor. You sound like you would probably really like the OR, with your dental assisting background. (We do some complex dental cases in our OR, as well as almost everything else.) If you work in a trauma center, you will likely still do nights, and there is call where you may have to get up in the night to cover emergencies. But there is less night shifts then the floor. (It varies at each hospital). If you know you are dead set on RNFA, I don't see any reason for you not to go straight to the OR. I am also considering grad school, but I am interested in FNP. I am looking to prn on a med-surg floor, or in another unit to keep all my assessment skills active, and to keep doors open as the OR is very focused. Look into the job requirements for your future goals and plan accordingly. I think a masters prepared OR nurse would be useful for: educator/management/research/infection control. A masters regardless will open more doors for you.
  5. 0
    You will never regret leaving the bedside!! Go for it if the opportunity is presenting itself.
  6. 0
    Thank you both for the replies!! I am putting my feelers out there now, applying to OR jobs. I want this, especially after the last shift I had..
  7. 2
    I'm a LPN who worked on a med surg floor for less than a year.. Hated it, and I have no shame about it. I have been a surg tech for many years before that, and now I'm back in the OR, and yes as a surg tech , but I'm happy. I do plan on applying for LPN to RN bridge program soon. I would eventually like to get my RNFA. Don't worry about experience in the OR, ,ig it's a good OR with a good educator, they will precept you thru each speciality
    magnum68 and Madras like this.
  8. 0
    Opportunity knocked, interview tomorrow!!! Nervous narvus!!
  9. 0
    good luck!!!
  10. 0
    I don't know if this was a sign but on my way I passed a lady whose license plate was CNOR and some number..
  11. 0
    good luck to you I have been wanting to got to OR as well been in CVICU for 4 years with a previous 3 years of med surge experience before CVICU...
  12. 0
    Good luck! I worry about going to nursing school sometimes because there is no guarantee of getting an OR job (or a job at all, but that is another topic, lol). And I just couldn't see myself doing floor nursing. I actually am considering going to Surg tech school because then I know I could only work OR. But less pay, less opportunities for advancement, even less jobs out there. It's a tough decision.


Top