To become an OR Nurse... - page 2

In order to become an OR nurse do I need a bsn or is an adn ok? I am barely in my 3rd semester of pre reqs at a cc and would like to know which way to go. I was thinking of doing the surgical tech program and working in that... Read More

  1. 1
    Quote from OrNurrse03
    To be an OR nurse, you need your BSN.
    I would have to disagree. I would say that it helps but certainly not required. All depends where you live and the job market, too. Of course, if they see BSN on your resume, they'll probably take you over someone with an ADN, but it is certainly not a requirement for the OR. I am in the process of getting my BSN. In hindsight, that is what I should have done from the start. Including the prerequisites, it took me almost three years for an ADN and with one more year, I could have had a BSN.
    barbyann likes this.

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  2. 0
    Here we go....Throughout the history of perioperative nursing, we have obtain our license to practice in the OR through dipolma (hospital), associates and undergraduate programs. Yes, I get it.....you don't have to obtain a BSN to practice in the OR "right now." However, did you notice that Magnet hospitals are hiring BSN nurses and requiring current employees to get their degree within 10 years? Many organizations, such as the AACN and ANA, endorses the intitative of making BSN the minimial preparation for professional practice. In the meantime, while you are being grandfathered, do you want to resist or adapt to change? Whether you're offended by my statement or not, I am speaking for those that are planning on becoming OR nurses.

    While time allows, yes get yor ADN and then transition to BSN route. Make BSN your academic goal for job security and marketability. My statement of needing your BSN to work in the OR will happen.
  3. 1
    Quote from Sweet_Wild_Rose
    Depends on the facility. My facility does not require a BSN, and the vast majority of our OR nurses are ADNs who graduated from the school affiliated with the health system.
    Nor does the facility where I had my first OR job. Many nurses with an ADN.
    barbyann likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from OrNurrse03
    Here we go....Throughout the history of perioperative nursing, we have obtain our license to practice in the OR through dipolma (hospital), associates and undergraduate programs. Yes, I get it.....you don't have to obtain a BSN to practice in the OR "right now." However, did you notice that Magnet hospitals are hiring BSN nurses and requiring current employees to get their degree within 10 years? Many organizations, such as the AACN and ANA, endorses the intitative of making BSN the minimial preparation for professional practice. In the meantime, while you are being grandfathered, do you want to resist or adapt to change? Whether you're offended by my statement or not, I am speaking for those that are planning on becoming OR nurses.

    While time allows, yes get yor ADN and then transition to BSN route. Make BSN your academic goal for job security and marketability. My statement of needing your BSN to work in the OR will happen.
    I was so not offended by your statement. The girl wanted to know if a BSN was required to work in an operating room. Although I have since advanced in my professional careers and goals, I went straight into the operating room with an ADN. Fortunately, your above-mentioned initiatives are taking place. Unfortunately, when hospitals are short-staffed, they'll take what they can get.
  5. 0
    My advice is to give her the realities of what is best for her to become a perioperative nurse. To suggest that getting an ADN is 'good enough' is injustice. Apparently, it wasn't good enough for you! I refuse to give minimal advice to those that ask. It's important to give the educational and political aspect of what is going on in nursing and how to advance yourself for future changes that will occur.
  6. 0
    Well thank u for all your honesty. I will work on my pre reqs for a bsn and do my adn first. Really I wanted to know if doing the surgical tech would at least get me in and maybe help with that whole networking thing. The nurses I know are primarily lvn's or work with psych patients.
  7. 1
    Don't forget you might have to be on call, and that doesnt always work with having kids, unless you have some really good resources.
    barbyann likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from OrNurrse03
    My advice is to give her the realities of what is best for her to become a perioperative nurse. To suggest that getting an ADN is 'good enough' is injustice. Apparently, it wasn't good enough for you! I refuse to give minimal advice to those that ask. It's important to give the educational and political aspect of what is going on in nursing and how to advance yourself for future changes that will occur.
    My advice was exactly what she wanted to know and no more. To quote the person asking the question, "Really I wanted to know if doing the surgical tech would at least get me in ..." Spending two years obtaining an ADN would, in my opinion, be more advantageous than spending two years in surg tech school. Forums are a place to exchange ideas and opinions, not to get chastised, so enough said.
  9. 3
    Quote from mclennan
    There is no such thing as an "RN degree."

    How many times does this have to be clarified?

    You earn an Associate Degree in Nursing, generally takes 2 years;

    Or you earn a Bachelor's Degree in Nursing, generally takes 4 years.

    Both degrees qualify you to sit for NCLEX. If you pass you are granted the REGISTERED NURSE (RN) LICENSE. "RN" is a LICENSE, not a degree.

    And yes, everyone should just stop mucking around with the ADN and get their BSN as soon as possible.
    So sorry I mis-typed while trying to help someone after my long shift. I bet every time someone uses the wrong word it means they are an idiot.

    Chill a little bit.
    iToniai, barbyann, and SmoothOperatorRN like this.
  10. 0
    This was a bit much. I mucked around and got an ADN and got a job in ICU right out of school. Some people mucked around with a BSN and still jobless.
    Quote from mclennan
    There is no such thing as an "RN degree."

    How many times does this have to be clarified?

    You earn an Associate Degree in Nursing, generally takes 2 years;

    Or you earn a Bachelor's Degree in Nursing, generally takes 4 years.

    Both degrees qualify you to sit for NCLEX. If you pass you are granted the REGISTERED NURSE (RN) LICENSE. "RN" is a LICENSE, not a degree.

    And yes, everyone should just stop mucking around with the ADN and get their BSN as soon as possible.


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