Sterile field monitored constantly? Define please - page 2

Does anyone have a policy that defines who to monitor constantly a sterile field when a case is delayed? With staffing being so tight how can you balance using staff to monitor a room with the need for them to help in some other... Read More

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    WOW!! This is really complicated and and amazing. I definitely do not think that I have what it takes to work in an OR. That is not even taking into account my weak stomach. I hope my questions have not offended or annoyed anyone in this board. I really appreciate everyone's time and patience in explaining things to me. I am really glad that I joined this board, because I have learned so much more than I have in a long time.

    What is it like to be in OR for a surgery? I mean what are the feelings you get from being htere?

    Nick

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    WOW!! This is really complicated and and amazing. I definitely do not think that I have what it takes to work in an OR. That is not even taking into account my weak stomach.
    Don't sell yourself short. Even the most seasoned OR nurses I've had the pleasure to work with are ALWAYS watching and maintaining that sterile field, and I got some great advice as a newbie from one of them. She said her secret is to visualize everyone and everything in the sterile field as having an "aura" (or force field, whichever works fo you) around them, and that you cannot cross into that aura. Maintain a safe distance, and genrally follow procedures. Manipulating around this environment soon becomes one of the easier parts of the job, because you become so aware of it. The complicated stuff comes later.

    I say this from the prospective of a student nurse who has the fortunate opportunity to work as a nurse tech in an OR. I've only been working here for about six months, and there is so much to learn! I've got the sterile field part down, can follow a case from start to finish, from pre-op report to post-op. Help in setup, do many of the "go-fer" duties when something is needed by the team, (flipping supplies or passing them onto the field.) I can set up the bovie and suction, am becoming very aware of the many types of tables and positioning standards, follow the patient into recovery and listen to report.

    Those things are exhausting enough, but then the truly challenging part comes in. Knowing which instruments will be needed by which surgeon for which case. Sure, we have "cards" that are printed out that have surgeon prefernences, but many of these cards are out of date. Why? Well, it *is* the RN's job to add in any changes. Most of these RN's have been working at this job for so long, "they don't need no stinkin' cards!":chuckle

    Is it a wonder with RN's having to know every aspect and anticipate each step of so many surgeries, done by so many different surgeons that "cards" don't always get filled in? When one circ is answering calls for doctors, taking care of the scrub, the surgeon, and the anisthesiologist, as well as being constantly aware of the patient and be ready to act in a split second, not to mention the neccessary paperwork for the patient, I somehow can forgive these hard working people for allowing the "cards" to be a low priority.

    Whew! OR nurses really are great. Can't wait to beome one officially!

    What is it like to be in OR for a surgery? I mean what are the feelings you get from being htere?
    For me, I'm still in awe. And I have gotten to second scrub on a few cases. Whenever I get the chance to, I second scrub. The human body is amazing, and actually being able to visualize everything helps immensely, indeed it's vital to an OR nurse.

    As for if you could stomach it, well, many can't. Some get over it, others don't. Though I was too in awe when I was first allowed to watch a surgery from the anesthesiologist's spot above the patient's head, with the firm admonition "don't move, and if you get sick, take a step back and sit down on the ground." I never had a problem with nausea.

    Your questions are welcome, and no matter what you go on to do, never loose that curiosity or be afraid to ask.
    Last edit by CarolineRn on May 31, '02
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    Thanks alot. This is what makes me really enjoy chatting with medical people. That is many of them are more than willing to share their exerpeices and explain htings. This is truly amazing to me. I can not describe how much I appreciate all of you.

    Nick


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