Pregnancy and work hours

  1. 0
    Just wondering if anyone's OR unit has specific guidelines for work hours for pregnant nurses. I am currently 28 weeks pregnant and work full-time in the OR. I am required to take mandatory late days, which lasts as long as they need you there (one of my last late shifts was 16 hrs long), and 24 hr call. I'm not trying to sound like a cry baby, but we all know a busy OR is physically demanding. My back, feet and hips hurt so bad and after a 16 hr day or 24 hrs on call, the last thing I want to do is go home, catch a few hrs of sleep and do it all over again the next day. Between the mandatory late days and call, it usually totals up to 8 or 9 days a month.

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  2. 36 Comments...

  3. 6
    The only thing we do differently for pregnant employees is to add a second dosimeter, to be worn under lead at waist level and keep them out of ORs using bone cement. Other than that, they are expected to meet the same expectations they had before they became pregnant- circulating, scrubbing, call, off-shifts, no changes in duties to be performed whatsoever. Your choices are to continue to do the job, make deals with other staff to take your call (we have one who offers $50/call), or look for another job. Most of nursing is physical, not just the OR (it just may be in different ways).
    meganmc02, Meriwhen, itsmejuli, and 3 others like this.
  4. 7
    Quote from Ilovethe80s
    Just wondering if anyone's OR unit has specific guidelines for work hours for pregnant nurses. I am currently 28 weeks pregnant and work full-time in the OR. I am required to take mandatory late days, which lasts as long as they need you there (one of my last late shifts was 16 hrs long), and 24 hr call. I'm not trying to sound like a cry baby, but we all know a busy OR is physically demanding. My back, feet and hips hurt so bad and after a 16 hr day or 24 hrs on call, the last thing I want to do is go home, catch a few hrs of sleep and do it all over again the next day. Between the mandatory late days and call, it usually totals up to 8 or 9 days a month.
    In my OR, pregnant nurses are expected to perform like the rest of us. They wear special lead and 2 dosimeters- that's it. They'll try not to put them in a case with bone cement but even that isn't guaranteed. IMO, pregnant workers shouldn't get special treatment. We have nurses with health problems, some of them chronic and they do their share. Not trying to be harsh, but you really can't expect special treatment for pregnancy. If it gets really bad, you may have to see if your doctor can put you out, but most won't do that, unless you are having complications.
    meganmc02, Sweet charm, kabfighter, and 4 others like this.
  5. 1
    You just need to get your OB doctor to write you to not work more than 8 hours a day. Pregnancy is a special time and it will be over soon. You need to enjoy this time. However you can't expect your co workers or manager to think like this. You have to look out for yourself and your unborn baby. Congratulation
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
  6. 0
    Thanks for the responses. Never said I expect special treatment or that other aspects of nursing are not as physically demanding. Just curious if other OR's make adjustments for their nurses. Most of my work experience is in the military where things are certainly different.
  7. 9
    Adjustments for pregnant nurses IS special treatment if you ask me.
    GadgetRN71, kabfighter, OCNRN63, and 6 others like this.
  8. 5
    Quote from CarolinaBSN2012
    You just need to get your OB doctor to write you to not work more than 8 hours a day. Pregnancy is a special time and it will be over soon. You need to enjoy this time. However you can't expect your co workers or manager to think like this. You have to look out for yourself and your unborn baby. Congratulation
    A) Then the person would not be able to meet the requirements of the job
    B) Sure wouldn't be making any friends by not pulling a fair share of the workload.

    I get that pregnancy is a special time, but it is not a disability or disease. Most times, it's a choice. There shouldn't be any policies granting "special treatment" to pregnant nurses unless it affects safety- such as closer monitoring of radiation exposure and avoidance of bone cement. Long work days are an annoyance to everyone, and the load should be shared equally.
    GadgetRN71, kabfighter, wooh, and 2 others like this.
  9. 1
    Ok, thank you for your point of view; I get it. Enough said. It was just a question. In the military pregnant women are put on a profile during the end of their pregnancy. I was just curious how this is translated in the civilian world. Also, I did not start this thread to start an argument or ******* match. Again, it was just a question.
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
  10. 1
    Quote from Ilovethe80s
    Ok, thank you for your point of view; I get it. Enough said. It was just a question. In the military pregnant women are put on a profile during the end of their pregnancy. I was just curious how this is translated in the civilian world. Also, I did not start this thread to start an argument or ******* match. Again, it was just a question.
    Prior service member here who was also pregnant in the military---and who also was on profile and had different PT, wasn't allowed to clean weapons or touch a vehicle let alone wear my Kevlar gear. I get what you're asking and I DO think that some exceptions should be made. Yes, pregnancy is a choice, however, not one we should be punished for or be jumped all over for. Hubby and I are considering IVF and I am TERRIFIED of how co-workers will react when I slow down or can't fit between the bed and computers in our impossibly small rooms, and this thread did nothing to make me feel better. :/ wish you luck and hopefully coworkers will be a bit more understanding. Besides, I can't see how you'll be able to navigate in tight places with that belly messing with your balance!

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
  11. 0
    I am also an OR nurse nd cureently 27wks pregnant..were def not asking for special tx..we new what we were gettn ourselves into when we signed contracts..with that said..the OR is a very fast paced job with hard work nd long hrs..I have anywhere from my 8hrs to 16hrs..I get put in operations with radiation..n orthopedic surgery nd contaminated surgery..when it comes to the point that my body wont give anymore bcz I need to rest..I have non problem gettn a letter from my obgyn stating that I cant work more than 8hrs..it wont be a permanent situation..just until I go on maternity..nd I see nothing wrong with that!


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