Precepting an experienced nurse

  1. I work in a small OR and they just hired a couple of nurses that are on orientation. One woman is having diffuculty catching on to the fast pace and just catching on in general. Even doctors comment on her sometimes questionable performance. The other one is too new to make that assessment, yet. But, the issue with her is that she just keeps talking and talking.

    The couple of times I had her in my room and I was explaining how we did things like a prep or whatever I couldn't get a word in edgewise. I would start to explain something or better yet, answer her question and she would cut me off with her own experience at her other job or relay a story and just blablablablablablablablablablablablablablablablabl ablablablablablablablablablablablablablablablablab lablablablablablablablablablablablablalba......... ..............

    I couldn't even interupt her or try to talk more loudly over her because she was like brick wall in her own talking world.

    I've been thinking of possible things that I could say and approaches I could take but I'd like to know if any of you have had this issue and would love to hear any suggestions that I might try.

    The first woman who is not catching on also has an annoying habit of criticizing everything we do and how we do it. I felt like I was being accused of bad nursing and also heard complaints from other staff members of the same issue and they expressed similar feelings. One day I was just so sick of hearing it that in frustrated moment of fairly well contained rage I just threw up my hands and said "Take it to Carol if you have problem with it." Then she complained that I was rude to her. But, she was told in her meeting "Boy, if you made Pam mad than you must have done something really bad because she never gets mad."

    So, any suggestions on precepting know-it-all nurses would be appreciated.
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   arianaRN
    How frustrating, but what a funny post. In my precepting experience I've had the full range of dream-orientees to "what-were-they-thinking-when-they-hired-her" ones. In my experience, the ones who were newbie know-it-all's didn't stay in the OR too long because it just wasn't a good fit. Even though they "knew it all", they were the ones who were terrified when it came to taking call, because finally their deep-down insecurities overrode their defense mechanism of talking their way around a situation. So, if it's any comfort, you probably won't have to deal with the know-it-all's for too long. (sorry if that seems mean).:spin:

    Sounds like you do a good job of just keeping on trying to teach, despite the wall of talking & criticizing. Do you do formal evaluations for the orientees? In my precepting experience, we filled out forms that highlighted strengths & areas for them to work on. We also met with the orientees & clinical educator (if you have one) on some sort of regular basis to talk about the evals. Or you could just go directly to the clinical educator or manager & express your concerns. Your job is busy enough trying to both do your job & precept someone, let alone do behavior modification!

    Good luck!
  4. by   Pam RN
    No, that didn't sound mean. You're absolutely right. I'll just let her talk her way into trouble if she seems to know it all. I'm trying to give her our way of doing things, give her hints and shortcuts and the like and if she doesn't care to listen then it's up to the supervisor to deal with. If it continues I'll take my concerns to the boss.
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Pam RN
    I work in a small OR and they just hired a couple of nurses that are on orientation. One woman is having diffuculty catching on to the fast pace and just catching on in general. Even doctors comment on her sometimes questionable performance. The other one is too new to make that assessment, yet. But, the issue with her is that she just keeps talking and talking.

    The couple of times I had her in my room and I was explaining how we did things like a prep or whatever I couldn't get a word in edgewise. I would start to explain something or better yet, answer her question and she would cut me off with her own experience at her other job or relay a story and just blablablablablablablablablablablablablablablablabl ablablablablablablablablablablablablablablablablab lablablablablablablablablablablablablalba......... ..............

    I couldn't even interupt her or try to talk more loudly over her because she was like brick wall in her own talking world.

    I've been thinking of possible things that I could say and approaches I could take but I'd like to know if any of you have had this issue and would love to hear any suggestions that I might try.

    The first woman who is not catching on also has an annoying habit of criticizing everything we do and how we do it. I felt like I was being accused of bad nursing and also heard complaints from other staff members of the same issue and they expressed similar feelings. One day I was just so sick of hearing it that in frustrated moment of fairly well contained rage I just threw up my hands and said "Take it to Carol if you have problem with it." Then she complained that I was rude to her. But, she was told in her meeting "Boy, if you made Pam mad than you must have done something really bad because she never gets mad."

    So, any suggestions on precepting know-it-all nurses would be appreciated.
    We must have hired the twin sisters of the two you're describing. Only both of the sisters are trapped in one body.

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