New RN, New OR Hire, How do I survive

  1. 2
    I was recently hired into my dream position as a Perioperative Nurse. This is the reason i went to nursing school. I can't believe my first position is actually in my hospital of choice in my position of choice. I was licensed end of August 2012, and went right back to school for my BSN which i am still working on. I was supposed to start in march but they changed the intern program to june, which is fine because i can finish out this course heavy semester and not have to balance that with the studying i will be doing for the OR. I will have some down time and want to learn as much as i can before hand. I also would love some pointers on how to survive or shall i say Thrive in the OR. I was told that the nurses at my hospital do 90% circulating but we will be taught scrubbing, which i would love to do. I eventually would like to first assist. I am so excited and so nervous too. This is my dream and i don't want to blow it! I don't want to be that nurse or that intern that everyone complains about. All advice is welcome I am a new newbie!
    born2circulateRN and GadgetRN71 like this.
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  4. 1
    Congrats! Here are some tips. 1) be willing to learn. It sounds easy but sometimes people don't listen as much as they should. If you have one preceptor, do things the way he/she taught you at first. You can tweak your practice later 2) don't take things personally. You may get snapped at here or there, especially in an emergency situation. 3) get yourself a little notebook and write things down as needed. 4) get some good shoes..you will spend a lot of time on your feet. 5) try to get good sleep each night. It's hard to learn new things when your body and mind are exhausted.

    Good luck!!
    iToniai likes this.
  5. 1
    Firstly, let me say, "Congratulations on your new position" because you have worked hard and long! I, too, am still a newbie, so to speak. I've been an RN since 2011, worked in med/surg for 3 months, repaired a shoulder injury and my second job was an OR position...also my dream job. It's a lot of work. I lost 24lbs in my first 10 month just circulating - LOL

    If you can start by scrubbing first, I believe that it's invaluable!! You'll learn more about the sutures, the counting sequence and all of the instruments much faster than if you were circulating first. I started out circulating and 13 months later, I'm still confused by all the sutures, what's used where, etc. Most important is knowing your count sequence. Initial counts, count when closing a cavity within a cavity, when closing fascia, and when closing skin. If you're ever in doubt, count. Some scrubs and other RNs get persnickety but it's your license on the line.

    I have 3 courses left to complete my BSN and it's been very challenging! Working full time in the OR (as that's a different type of nursing school altogether), studying for classes and trying to just have a life are a rough juggle, but just balance time wisely. Great chemistry with your preceptors are invaluable. If you feel like you're not getting what you need, speak up soon so you can get a new preceptor or he/she can use a different teaching style.

    Lastly, a lot of the experienced nurses forget that we new nurses don't know all of their jargon and shortcuts, so write everything down :-)

    Doctor's preference cards and pick sheets give you great info on each doctor's style.

    Good luck again and welcome to the OR!
    NMB
    iToniai likes this.
  6. 0
    Firstly, let me say, "Congratulations on your new position" because you have worked hard and long! I, too, am still a newbie, so to speak. I've been an RN since 2011, worked in med/surg for 3 months, repaired a shoulder injury and my second job was an OR position...also my dream job. It's a lot of work. I lost 24lbs in my first 10 months just circulating - LOL

    If you can start by scrubbing first, I believe that it's invaluable!! You'll learn more about the sutures, the counting sequence and all of the instruments much faster than if you were circulating first. I started out circulating and 13 months later, I'm still confused by all the sutures, what's used where, etc. Most important is knowing your count sequence. Initial counts, count when closing a cavity within a cavity, when closing fascia, and when closing skin. If you're ever in doubt, count. Some scrubs and other RNs get persnickety but it's your license on the line.

    I have 3 courses left to complete my BSN and it's been very challenging! Working full time in the OR (as that's a different type of nursing school altogether), studying for classes and trying to just have a life are a rough juggle, but just balance time wisely. Great chemistry with your preceptors are invaluable. If you feel like you're not getting what you need, speak up soon so you can get a new preceptor or he/she can use a different teaching style.

    Lastly, a lot of the experienced nurses forget that we new nurses don't know all of their jargon and shortcuts, so write everything down :-)

    Doctor's preference cards and pick sheets give you great info on each doctor's style.

    Good luck again and welcome to the OR!
    NMB
  7. 0
    Thanks for the great advice. Even though i have a few months before i start, i have ordered some books on instruments and practices, just to get a head start.
  8. 0
    Congratulations on your new position!
  9. 0
    My biggest piece of advice to all new to our facility is to take each day one day at a time and DO NOT get overwhelmed. You will get it but it takes time. Best wishes
  10. 0
    Thank you, i will try to remember to breath!!!
  11. 0
    Quote from alodocios
    Thank you, i will try to remember to breath!!!

    How is the OR going?


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