Constantly Starting IV's in OR??

  1. Hi, Im looking into going into OR nursing (just started school and looking into different specialties) and I was wondering if you are constantly starting IVs, or if not, who does that? I have an IV phobia (Im sure after alot of practice it will subside, but as for now, :imbar ) and I was wondering what, if any, specialty starts the LEAST IVs.

    Thanks!!!


    Alissa
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   TeenyBabyRN
    Quote from Nurse Alissa
    Hi, Im looking into going into OR nursing (just started school and looking into different specialties) and I was wondering if you are constantly starting IVs, or if not, who does that? I have an IV phobia (Im sure after alot of practice it will subside, but as for now, :imbar ) and I was wondering what, if any, specialty starts the LEAST IVs.

    Thanks!!!


    Alissa

    I worked in OR for a year and a half and never started the first IV there (which I hated, because I LOVE to start IV's!) - they were mostly started by the nurses in holding room or by the nurse anesthetists, unless the patient came from the ER or one of the units (or floors). Those patients, of course, already had IV access in place.
  4. by   Nurse Alissa
    Well thats comforting to hear! :chuckle In your opinion, did you enjoy OR nursing? I have read so many people who work there and are sooo happy with their jobs. I think I would like OR nursing from what I hear the average day is like (Getting the patient from holding room, comforting them, bringing them to OR and getting them on table, watching over surgery, paperwork then bringing them to recovery). PLEASE CORRECT ME IF IM MISTAKEN! I am still new at all of this, so Im only going from the ideas Ive gotten from this site. I would appreciate if you could give me insight as to what its really like to be an OR nurse.


    Thanks!

    Alissa
  5. by   angel337
    i used to have that same phobia about drawing blood. iv's are not as intimidating as they look. i would suggest you take a summer tech job or if you can take a phlebotomy class to get yo familiar with how the vein feels, correct procedure etc., you may learn these techniques in nursing schools but a lot of schools don't give you the opportunity to actually do it on a patient. nurse intern jobs give yo more exposure too. don't worry, once you start you won't have any problem.
  6. by   shodobe
    Nurse Allissa, search through the previous threads and you will find one that concentrates on what it is like to be a OR nurse. It has been awhile so look back quite a bit back. I like starting IVs, especially on kids and babies. I usually have no problem and will start them for anesthesia. I learned my skills many years ago when I worked for a local lab drawing blood for them. It really helped, because I could draw 10cc from a finger if necessary. good luck and don't worry about it. Mike
  7. by   ceecel.dee
    In our small hospital OR/Same Day Surgery area, I start about 5-10 IV's/day. We actually are called to the floor for difficult starts. No one is born to be good at a skill...skills are developed, so don't be afraid of any skill! We all started where you are now, and eventually become good at skills we practice alot. Don't let fear steer your career! You will get it!
  8. by   MelissaRN
    When I first started nursing I hated starting IV's. I got sick of having to ask people to start them for me so I got my certification. Go with a resource nurse for a couple of hours and they can precept you. That's what I did. I love starting them now and will offer when other nurses don't have time.
  9. by   stevierae
    Same here. I love starting IVs, peds or adults. Makes the case less boring if I know that I as the circulator get to do something "hands on" other than prepping, putting on a bovie pad, assisiting with induction, opening supplies and paperwork.
  10. by   mother/babyRN
    In OB we are the ones that start the ivs...We send them to the OR all ready and runnning..
  11. by   MelissaRN
    [B]I think it's a good idea to have a fresh IV going before surgery. For all you seasoned OR nurses, does guage size matter? I always try to start a pt going to preop with a 18 or 20 guage.
  12. by   shodobe
    Please take them off of those ridiculous IVAC machines before sending to the OR. Most of the IVs I get from the floor do not run and we have no idea where the fluids went! We have to re-start about half of the IVs we get because they are kept on the IVACs up to the last moment and they have really no idea if it is patent and running well. It seems ALL patients are put on these and I really wished they would go back to the "old" days where you really had to keep an "eye" on your drips. I really feel old tonight, sorry. Mike
  13. by   stevierae
    Quote from shodobe
    Please take them off of those ridiculous IVAC machines before sending to the OR. Most of the IVs I get from the floor do not run and we have no idea where the fluids went! We have to re-start about half of the IVs we get because they are kept on the IVACs up to the last moment and they have really no idea if it is patent and running well. It seems ALL patients are put on these and I really wished they would go back to the "old" days where you really had to keep an "eye" on your drips. I really feel old tonight, sorry. Mike
    LOL, so true--we have to disconnect them, leave them out in the hallway, and then change the tubing to our own tubing once we get into the room. I know, it seems that perfectly healthy patients with simple IVs of RL--no piggybacks; no additives to the primary--are put on pumps, rather than just adjusting the drip rate manually with the roller clamp. Just adjust it to KVO and leave it! We can turn it up once they arrive in the OR! But, then again, it seems like we always have to start another one anyway, as the primary is either posiitonal or it has been started with a 24 gauge catheter.
  14. by   ceecel.dee
    Yes, please, no pumps, and none of those narrow caliber IV loops or extentions that make the tubing lay down nice! These slow down the free flow so a rapid bolus cannot happen. We like at least an 18 gauge, but 20's are okay usually.

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