Chloraprep for foley insertion?

  1. 0
    I usually try to mind my own business because the last thing I want to be known for is being that NP that thinks she knows everything, but I was blown away yesterday when I saw an OR nurse use chloraprep for foley insertion on a female. Now, I don't know everything, but having been a scrub tech, then OR nurse, and now Surgical NP, I've never seen it done before. When I spoke up about it, I was told they use it all the time. The only instance I've seen alcohol used directly on genitalia/mucous membranes is on penile prosthesis insertions, only because of the infection risk. Do any of you use chloraprep or duraprep or any other alcohol based products for foley insertion?
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  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I've seen it used over chest tube sites before the tubes come out. I would think they'd have to use it like when the patient is allergic to betadine.
  5. 0
    Quote from Kara RN BSN
    I've seen it used over chest tube sites before the tubes come out. I would think they'd have to use it like when the patient is allergic to betadine.
    We've always used Hibiclens or the cheaper chlorhexidine gluconate, the use of an alcohol product just threw me off.
  6. 0
    Quote from kguill975
    We've always used Hibiclens or the cheaper chlorhexidine gluconate, the use of an alcohol product just threw me off.
    Same here. The ChloraPrep rep did tell us that it would be okay to use since it's still only used externally, but I'll stick to the betadine and milder stuff anyway. None of the nurses where I work would dream of using ChloraPrep for a foley insertion (and management would have a cow, because we get betadine swabs prepackaged in our foley kits, so the ChloraPrep would be an extra cost).
  7. 0
    Quote from kguill975
    I usually try to mind my own business because the last thing I want to be known for is being that NP that thinks she knows everything, but I was blown away yesterday when I saw an OR nurse use chloraprep for foley insertion on a female. Now, I don't know everything, but having been a scrub tech, then OR nurse, and now Surgical NP, I've never seen it done before. When I spoke up about it, I was told they use it all the time. The only instance I've seen alcohol used directly on genitalia/mucous membranes is on penile prosthesis insertions, only because of the infection risk. Do any of you use chloraprep or duraprep or any other alcohol based products for foley insertion?
    I've only used betadine.

    However, Chloraprep is not alcohol based:

    2,2'-(1,6-Hexanediyl)bis(1-{(E)-amino[(4-chlorophenyl)amino]methylene}guanidine) - D-gluconic acid (1:1)
  8. 3
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    I've only used betadine.

    However, Chloraprep is not alcohol based:

    2,2'-(1,6-Hexanediyl)bis(1-{(E)-amino[(4-chlorophenyl)amino]methylene}guanidine) - D-gluconic acid (1:1)
    Not sure where you got your info, but Chloraprep is 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate and 70% Isopropyl Alcohol, that's why we wait 3 minutes before draping after prepping, to reduce the risk of fire.
    mamamiah, ORoxyO, and KeyMaster like this.
  9. 0
    I have used chloraprep in the past when the pt has an allergy to betadine. But looking back we should of used
    Hibiclens.

    Thanks,


  10. 0
    I was an OR nurse for a year and half and now do per diem. I would never ever use chloroprep. It is specifically not meant for mucous membranes. We have inservices on it yearly. Betadine only and if they have an allergy then hibaclens. We always do a pre wash with soap and our new foleys have the pre wash towelettes enclosed which are the same towelettes you use to do a clean catch. I've seen some residents even grab the chloroprep sponges for hand washing to do a prescrub and have told them no way. Alcohol based scrubs are never meant for mucous membranes.
  11. 0
    Chloraprep does have alcohol, we have 3 minute time out (fire risk). If pt has iodine allergy, I've used hibiclens.
  12. 0
    Chloraprep is contraindicated for Foley insertion because of the mucous membranes.


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