Are Techs And RN's equal in managements eyes? - page 3

I am new and this is my first post. I have been a surgical tech for 4yrs now, and work 3-11p at a Level One Trauma Center. Taking the evening shift, I became the sole staff employee on this shift,... Read More

  1. by   RN Zeke
    Respect for education and what each degree, diploma means goes a long way.
    Go get that degree, I did after many years as a tech. I can speak educated about tech's and RN's for I am both. Working together as a team should be the priority, to have an outcome that will benefit all.
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Working together as a team should be the priority, to have an outcome that will benefit all.
    Exactly
  3. by   Scrubby
    This is an interesting subject. Where i work surgical technician is a very dirty word. Unless there is a drastic change in management we will never have techs.

    I've read a few posts here about surgical techs and RN's. Personally as someone who loves to scrub and wishes to keep doing so, i admit i feel very threatened by the prospect of techs being introduced. I read a post here about how RNs in some places only circulate.

    I agree that if you wish to have more prospects then maybe doing your RN training is a better option.

    I really don't know much about techs BTW. What does the training involve? Does it involve just knowing the procedure and the surgical instrument? Or is it more holistic and takes into account everything that needs to be done for your patient in the operating room, positioning aids etc?
  4. by   ewattsjt
    i noticed that many posts are quoting law. remember that different states have different laws. (ie. only 37 states have laws protecting the circulator role). going to other countries make the differences even worse. in indiana you can only sue your employer under certain circumstances. basically you must prove they have harmed you and the harm was with intent.

    regardless, a tech is not and will never be equal in management's eyes because they are not. the comparison is apples to oranges. as a tech, one should know when they are going outside their scope of practice.

    i'm not trying to hijack the thread, just answering scrubby's question.
    Quote from scrubby
    i really don't know much about techs btw. what does the training involve? does it involve just knowing the procedure and the surgical instrument? or is it more holistic and takes into account everything that needs to be done for your patient in the operating room, positioning aids etc?
    unfortunately there are a couple types of surgical technologists.

    1) there is the on the job trained [ojt].

    2) there are program techs that are not certified and can not sit for the cst exam, the programs lasts 9 mths to a year.

    3) there is the certified surgical technologist [cst] which sits for the national certification exam given by the national board of surgical technology and surgical assisting [nbstsa] [font='times new roman']www.nbstsa.org . this is becoming the standard as over 33% of all surgical technologists are certified in this manner. some facilities require that the surgical techs be certified by this organization. my facility is one that has this requirement. the school is either a diploma or associate degree. there is a core curriculum that is followed and accreditation given by the commission on accreditation of allied health education programs [caahep] [font='times new roman']www.caahep.org . accreditation and the program are monitored by the accreditation review committee on education for surgical technology [arc-st] [font='times new roman']www.arcst.org . the program for this one lasts from 9 mths to two years. the degree is a diploma or associate degree. most associate degree techs have one to one and a half years of prerequisites (program prerequisites vary but mine was the same as nursing in my area having a&p 1 & 11, pharmacology, microbiology, psychology, speech, interpersonal communication, algebra, chemistry, english, medical law and ethics, medical terminology). there is also one year of studying surgical techniques and clinical sites. they learn everything from patient positioning, prep, foley to instrumentation to aseptic techniques, to suture and needles use, surgery type, classification, surgeon anticipation etc... all surgical procedures and specialties are taught. ie. ent, eyes, neuro, ortho, cv/pv, plastics, general, ob/gyn, endoscopies, etc...
  5. by   RN Zeke
    Very well, informed information! Wearing the hats (no pun intended), of both positions, I never had a problem with who is the boss.

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