A little pet peeve - page 3

OK, I just gotta say this, but I know it's really petty: WEITLANER!!!!!!!! It's called a WEITLANER!!!!! W-E-I-T-L-A-N-E-R!!!!!!! So why do even experienced nurses persist in adding a... Read More

  1. by   kimmicoobug
    oh and have had a patient say "latex" instead of "lasix".
  2. by   ShandyLynnRN
    Originally posted by stevierae
    Or maybe they are part of that group of nurses who DOES NOT SCRUB!!!!

    Sorry, I just could not resist--nurses who don't/won't scrub are my other pet peeve, one Shodobe shares with me.

    A Weitlaner is a small-self retaining "forked" retractor, commonly used to keep a small incision open--often, one is used at either end of the incision--such as for hernias, breast biopsies, ankle ORIFs.

    or we could be one of those nurses that read all the posts (or most) in the "todays active threads". I personally am an OB nurse, and only visit the OR during sectiions, and in my hospital we dont scrub. But thanks for the definition!
  3. by   JoRn
    Everyone I work with, including the surgeons call this retractor a "weitlander". It is written with a 'd' on the packaging. I never really thought about it before. Now I will have to check out the spelling.
  4. by   kelli_rn
    My hospital calls tonsil clamps "Rogers" after a doc that used them for everything. They also call bridge clamps, "long Rogers"...it drives me crazy because there is NO SUCH THING AS A ROGER. when I count, either scrubbing or circulating I call them tonsils and bridges and other staff look me like I am stupid. I have been here for 4 years and even the new people who never heard of a roger call it that. AAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHH
  5. by   neneRN
    plumrn- that's what I was going to say! We have one paramedic (who is an excellent medic) that comes in and ALWAYS says O2 STats when giving report. I want to scream "IT'S O2 SATuration, not O2 STATistics!", but he's so nice I don't want him to feel bad or be embarassed. So I just have to giggle to myself.
  6. by   OBNurseShelley
    LMAO, west virginia clamps!
  7. by   shodobe
    You'll find in most hospital ORs, instruments are named after certain surgeons who use them exclusively. We have a number named after long retired or dead surgeons. I still to this day, after 25 years, still call them by the only name I ever used. New nurses look at me with a strange eye, but I tell them the story behind them and they understand. I have gone in my catalogs and learned what they are really called and changed the names on the count sheets in the sets. Mike
  8. by   TracyB,RN
    Palestinian retractors, weitlanders hee hee hee.
    Stevie, it is perfectly ok to vent about these things. But probably b/c that kind of thing absolutely drives me bonkers!
  9. by   NS_RN
    Oooohh oooohhh...here's mine!! When patients are drowsy but easily roused, and nurses say easily aroused!!! Makes my ears burn. I can just picture it..."hey, baby."
  10. by   BadBird
    My pet peeve is when someone tells me that they bathed the patient and pronounce it" bath thed", drives me nuts, it must be a western Pa thing. Everyone on the unit says" bath thed", errrrr. another one is when someone asks for a gum band, WTF is a gum band, do I have 2 heads? It is a rubber band! I think people pronounce items according to the region they grow up in, so many different accents and slangs, some are cute and some are just annoying.
  11. by   stevierae
    Originally posted by nurseshell

    Also "prostrate" gland - prostate

    I know, I think the only person that should be forgiven for calling his prostate his "prostrate" is Andy Sipowicz (Dennis Franz) on NYPD Blue. When he says it, it's sorta endearing--he's just bein' Andy.

    I think people are saying "Old Timer's Disease" instead of "Alzheimer's" deliberately, as sort of a play on words--or are themselves elderly folks and that's how they really hear the words and understand the nature of the disease--as something that happens to their fellow "old-timers."
    Last edit by stevierae on Jan 21, '03
  12. by   stevierae
    Originally posted by shodobe
    You'll find in most hospital ORs, instruments are named after certain surgeons who use them exclusively. We have a number named after long retired or dead surgeons. I still to this day, after 25 years, still call them by the only name I ever used. New nurses look at me with a strange eye, but I tell them the story behind them and they understand. I have gone in my catalogs and learned what they are really called and changed the names on the count sheets in the sets. Mike
    You are so right, Shodobe.

    People who are not from Northern California have probably never heard Debakey pick-ups referred to as "Magics."

    The reason they are called "Magics" in Northern California, or so legend goes, is that Dr. Shumway (prima donna cardiac guy extraordinaire) from Stanford could not stand Dr. Michael DeBakey, so he would not allow the term "Debakey" to be used at Stanford.

    So many Stanford trained docs are around that "Magics" is just kinda the generic term now.

    All the guys that trained under Shumway are a buncha crybaby, whiny, prima donnas. They have this way of saying "Come ONNNNNNNNNN" if they think you don't hand an instrument fast enough, andf they all call themselves "Shumway's Boys--" which might be cute if they were 12 years old, but sounds really stupid considering that these guys are in their late 30s 40s and 50s----

    Is it that way in your experience, Shodobe?

    Also, in Northern CA, they call tonsil clamps "Schnitz." Don't know why; never did know why, but have been hearing it since OR school in Oakland in '75.

    In Oregon, they call Debakeys "atraugrips" or "atraus."
    Last edit by stevierae on Jan 21, '03
  13. by   stevierae
    Shodobe, here's another one you can probably relate to--have you ever worked with people who call "Duvals" (sp?) "Penningtons?"

    For readers who don't do OR---Duvals are lung clamps; Penningtons are hemorrhoid clamps.

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