10 top things!

  1. Hi,
    As a nursing student interested in going into OR nursing, can you guys suggest the top 10 things that you think it is important to know before you get there that will be useful to you when you're there? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
    Thanks
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   RNOTODAY
    Quote from turtles
    Hi,
    As a nursing student interested in going into OR nursing, can you guys suggest the top 10 things that you think it is important to know before you get there that will be useful to you when you're there? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
    Thanks
    1. make sure you really want to be there. there is limited pt contact, and you wouldnt be learning iv's, assessments, and other traditional "nursing" stuff
    2. make sure you are ok with technical things, there are tons of machines, and they break down and you have to trouble shoot them often, and there are lots of things that need to be "put together"
    3. make sure your orientation has a good scrubbing component to it, because it is important. very important.
    4. dont take rude or snippy behavior personal. it really is never personal.
    5 be ok with having to take call
  4. by   EricJRN
    Just thought I'd point out this great sticky posted in General Nursing Student Discussion by Marie_LPN, one of our site's OR nurses. While it's intended for nursing students on an OR rotation, many of her suggestions seem applicable to new nurses as well.

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f50/sooo...-r-135309.html
  5. by   turtles
    Thanks for the advice. What about knowledge base? Are there certain meds, surgical instruments or anything that would be useful to know?
  6. by   elcue
    Don't do it unless you are willing to stand up for yourself and your PATIENT in the face of rude, condescending behavior. (eg: surgeon:"I am NOT taking the time to count again, because there is NO WAY that missing sponge is inside her". If I only had a dime for every time.....)

    Be sure you can handle and reassure freaked-out scared-to-death family members and provide them with some comfort and reassurance.

    Have really strong assessment skills before you get there, as you will have to make assessments quickly, both during the short time you interact with your patient before induction, and as changes occur during surgery.

    You must be able to prioritize effectively.

    You can't be afraid of machines!

    You have to LOVE surgery, or this environment will eat you alive!

    Good luck to you. Linda
  7. by   ortess1971
    Quote from elcue
    Don't do it unless you are willing to stand up for yourself and your PATIENT in the face of rude, condescending behavior. (eg: surgeon:"I am NOT taking the time to count again, because there is NO WAY that missing sponge is inside her". If I only had a dime for every time.....)

    Be sure you can handle and reassure freaked-out scared-to-death family members and provide them with some comfort and reassurance.

    Have really strong assessment skills before you get there, as you will have to make assessments quickly, both during the short time you interact with your patient before induction, and as changes occur during surgery.

    You must be able to prioritize effectively.

    You can't be afraid of machines!

    You have to LOVE surgery, or this environment will eat you alive!

    Good luck to you. Linda
    :yeahthat: Also, I was going to add...

    1. Don't listen to those(instructors, other nurses etc) that tell you OR nursing isn't "real nursing". You will be that patients advocate, and must pay attention to what is going on with that patient. There is a person under all those drapes..
    2. Trust your gut instincts and don't let anyone or anything make you question your instincts.
    3. Surgeons are NOT God and are not infallible..Sometimes you have to put your foot down regarding sterility, counts, laterality etc. (this actually refers back to #1 of the above post!)
  8. by   inspir8tion
    I suggest doing a student nurse internship in the operating room. While you are there, begin to learn the over 700 instruments, the machines, the layout, the politics, etc.
  9. by   turtles
    Thanks everyone, it seems a bit intimidating but saying that, I love a challenge and the thought of OR nursing is exciting to me. Hopefully when the time comes I will be able to stand up for myself and my patients. I have some friends who are OR nurses and they absolutely love it so there must be some job satisfaction. All your advice is really helpful because when the time comes that I am being yelled at by a surgeon, I can think about what you have all said and not take it personally and deal with it in a professional way. Thanks.
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Don't do it unless you are willing to stand up for yourself and your PATIENT in the face of rude, condescending behavior. (eg: surgeon:"I am NOT taking the time to count again, because there is NO WAY that missing sponge is inside her". If I only had a dime for every time.....)
    Sometime the rude condescending behavior comes from supposed fellow co-workers as well. Something else to be made aware of.
  11. by   MMARN
    Quote from inspir8tion
    I suggest doing a student nurse internship in the operating room. While you are there, begin to learn the over 700 instruments, the machines, the layout, the politics, etc.
    This suggestion was made to me as well. I am also a nursing student considering OR nursing also, and this was one of the things I was adviced to do. It doesn't hurt to see what goes on personally.
  12. by   inspir8tion
    You're right. It is the closest thing to actually being in it and will give you a very good idea if this is really what you want

    Quote from Mave
    This suggestion was made to me as well. I am also a nursing student considering OR nursing also, and this was one of the things I was adviced to do. It doesn't hurt to see what goes on personally.

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