Georgetown Accelerated BSN - page 2

by firstyearRN

19,890 Views | 23 Comments

Anyone know anything about this program? The interview process? How many clinical hours there are required? Thanks so much for your input.... Read More


  1. 0
    Hey Angie,

    Thank you for your input. Gosh, everything you mentioned was probably the opposite of what I thought GU would be like! I thought they were more concerned with the success of their students and would be an excellent resource in terms of finding a job after graduating, but it appears thats not really the case.
    I'm having a dilemma trying to decide between GU and NYU - and I was leaning more towards GU because of the smaller class size, smaller clinical groups, and felt that they genuinely cared about their students. Also, I liked the fact that GU just seemed to have higher academic standards and has that prestige associated with the school. But it makes me nervous to pass out in the opportunity to study at NYU ... you mentioned the "name" of the school, and I feel that NYU is just more internationally known, whereas Georgetown would only be beneficial if I stayed in the DC area (which i don't plan on doing). I actually experienced this already with my undergrad degree from USC - essentially if you don't stay in Los Angeles or southern california, the "name" wouldn't be as valuable.
    Anyway, I'd really appreciate it if you can give any further advice on this - especially since I have about 2 weeks to make a final decision! Thank you!
  2. 0
    For what it's worth, I spoke to a few ABSN students at my visit and interview, and they said they loved the program (even when the administrators left the room). They said that they were always able to get help from teachers when they needed it, and that the people in their cohorts were really close. They told us that tutoring and study sessions were available, and that many people utilized these services when they had their weed-out class in the first semester.
  3. 0
    If you are deciding between DC and NY, try to identify where you want to work and what the tuition is like in each place (obviously both are really expensive). I know nothing about NY, but looking back at Georgetown I was happy with completing a nusing program in 16 months- however, I was upset about the expense and lack of structure in the program, which I know they are trying to work on, especially with the program growing so much. I also saw many students at smaller schools who were getting the same clinical experience, and had just as many job opportunities in the area.
    I too was very close to my cohort- and tutoring for first semester students is available for patho. We did, however have people fail out who had to attend for an extra semester.
    If I were deciding between two programs, I would try to make a budget and a plan for where you want to work after school, and try to decide which school fits best with both.
    Good luck! Let me know what you go with or if you have more questions!
  4. 0
    I'm reading all these comments about the ABSN program at Georgetown with interest, because I was just accepted for the Spring 2010 Accelerated 2nd degree BSN program at GU.

    When I got to Georgetown for my interview last Saturday - which was also the last day of interviews - the rumor mill said that only 1/3 of applicants were invited for an interview, and only 1/3 of those would get offers. Yeesh. Since I was also applying for the Washington Hospital Center (WHC) scholarship program, about 40 of us were stuffed on a bus, driven to WHC for a tour, and had a group discussion with the teaching/RN staff at WHC. It was all supposed to be very casual, but I noticed the WHC staff taking lots of notes. After the discussion, we got back on the bus, drove back to GU, and had lunch. Afterwards there was a BSN overview video and a tour of NHS (School of Nursing and Health Sciences). More group discussion followed, and we got to hear from several current ABSN students (GU staff left the room). The students were positive about the program, talked about how much support they got from other cohort members, but did say new students were getting a break because the ogre who taught Patho was retiring - and anyone new had to be better. After all that, I had about a 4 minute interview with two prof's from NHS. The day started at 8:00am, and I got done about 4:30pm.

    My takeaway from the day was: the group discussions are crucial. The staff at GU and WHC are watching all day, judging you, ranking you. Be an active participant and ask questions. Your 4 minute interview is just to confirm their preconceptions. I think they're looking for people with a passion to be nurses, who will fit in as team players, and who want to go to GU come hell or high water. The last part is important, because GU does only one round of admissions for each cohort, with no waiting list. If they make you an offer and you turn them down, that slot in the cohort goes to waste.

    Anyway, the interview was on Saturday, and I got my acceptance email the following Tuesday. I'm still waiting to hear from WHC if I've been accepted for their scholarship program, but having come this far, I like my chances.

    I've talked with a number of people who are/were in nursing school at some of the DC-metro schools. Everyone complains about Pathophysiology, the cost, the traffic, the pace, the occasional marginal teachers. Since everyone who gets into one of these programs is obviously smart, the keys to success apparently are FOCUS and SUPPORT. The focus part means don't try to hold a job during the program, and deal with potential distractions before starting the program. Drama at home would be a major roadblock. Support means you can't do this all on your own. You need a support network - friends, family, cohort - whatever holds you up when you're feeling down.

    Anyway, that's my story.
  5. 0
    Hi Pokytrokyt-

    What was your gpa when you applied to Georgetown. I want to apply there, but I feel my GPA is too low to apply. Also, I think it would be a lot of money if I didnt get the WHC scholarship.
  6. 0
    What follows is all just my personal opinion, based on my own experience. Take anything I say here with a grain of salt, and interpret it to suit your own circumstances.

    I went to two different colleges, 20 years apart before applying to GU. When I was young and foolish, i got only a 2.3 GPA. The second time I went to school, my GPA was a 3.4. If you don't think your GPA is all that great, take the GRE exam. If the score is good, send it to GU as part of your application. If not, take the test again or just don't submit it. While GPA is important, I know they look at a lot of different factors, like:
    - Age. Older is better. Older means more life and work experience, more maturity. If you've done something interesting like Peace Corps or military corpsman, that could be good, too.
    - Reliability. Finish what you start. Georgetown and WHC want to make sure they only admit people who will finish the program if they start. No dropouts need apply.
    - Commitment to healthcare. Volunteer at a local hospital or clinic. If you live in the DC area, volunteer at Washington Hospital Center (that's what I did), or Georgetown Hospital, if possible.
    - Pre-reqs. They count for a lot. Especially your grades in the hard sciences: Chemistry, Anatomy & Physiology I, II and Microbiology
    - Finances. They are serious when they tell you don't try to work even part time while you're in the accelerated BSN program. Even with a scholarship from WHC, there will be other costs and living expenses.
    - Have a really good answer ready for the question: "Why do you want to be a nurse?"
    - If you get that far, WHC will ask you to submit an essay question response. Mine was about a major challenge in your life that you had to overcome, how you overcame it, and how that will make you a better nurse. 1000 words or less.

    Don't put all your eggs in one basket. Apply to multiple schools. I applied to Marymount and Georgetown for Spring '2010 and would have applied to Johns Hopkins, George Mason, George Washington, and Shenandoah in Fall 2010 as well, if option #1 had fallen through.

    Also, give some thought to the nursing lifestyle. Even if you want to get an advanced nursing degree, you need to spend a couple years working as a nurse in a clinical setting first. Are you prepared to work a mix of day and overnight shifts? That's what you'll be doing at WHC. If you want 9:00 to 5:00, you'll want to work in a Dr's office instead... which would be a waste IMHO of a Georgetown BSN.

    (stepping down off soapbox now)
  7. 0
    I have a couple new questions for the group:

    I've been accepted at both Georgetown and Marymount to start in Spring 2010. My problem is, I wasn't offered a scholarship by WHC. So I need to get a better understanding of the value of the ABSN program at GU, if any, over the same program at MU:

    1. GU costs ~$70K and MU costs ~$48K. Do you get anything quantifiable for the cost difference? For instance, when I'm interviewing for my first job in a hospital, will a GU degree offer any advantage over a MU degree?
    2. I'm wondering if I'd have an easier time getting a job at GU Hospital after graduation, if I went to GU instead of MU?
    3. If I go to GU, I'll need to scrounge for scholarships/grants each semester while I'm in school. Will I get decent help in that regard from GU, or will I be left to do that pretty much on my own?
    4. How hard is it to get scholarships/grants from other sources other than the WHC scholarship program at GU? I'm male, 57 and most concerned about nailing down my first hospital job after graduation. If I'll have a better chance of getting that first job with help from GU than I would with MU, I'll pay the difference and take my chances.
    5. Are grads of GU any better prepared to be new nurses than MU grads? I'm not talking about NCLEX pass rates, but more about class sizes, clinical experience, etc.

    I need to fish or cut bait pretty soon and decide on Georgetown versus Marymount. Thanks for your help!

    - Alex
  8. 0
    Quote from Pokytrokyt
    I have a couple new questions for the group:

    I've been accepted at both Georgetown and Marymount to start in Spring 2010. My problem is, I wasn't offered a scholarship by WHC. So I need to get a better understanding of the value of the ABSN program at GU, if any, over the same program at MU:

    1. GU costs ~$70K and MU costs ~$48K. Do you get anything quantifiable for the cost difference? For instance, when I'm interviewing for my first job in a hospital, will a GU degree offer any advantage over a MU degree?
    2. I'm wondering if I'd have an easier time getting a job at GU Hospital after graduation, if I went to GU instead of MU?
    3. If I go to GU, I'll need to scrounge for scholarships/grants each semester while I'm in school. Will I get decent help in that regard from GU, or will I be left to do that pretty much on my own?
    4. How hard is it to get scholarships/grants from other sources other than the WHC scholarship program at GU? I'm male, 57 and most concerned about nailing down my first hospital job after graduation. If I'll have a better chance of getting that first job with help from GU than I would with MU, I'll pay the difference and take my chances.
    5. Are grads of GU any better prepared to be new nurses than MU grads? I'm not talking about NCLEX pass rates, but more about class sizes, clinical experience, etc.

    I need to fish or cut bait pretty soon and decide on Georgetown versus Marymount. Thanks for your help!

    - Alex
    Alex,
    It's a tough decision! I graduated from GU's ABSN - Dec 07. Don't know if the GU degree helps getting a job but it doesn't hurt. Do know that they don't help at all with getting scholarships/grants from other sources. I just got student loans which are pretty hefty. There is a program from the US Govt to get $$ to go to school - and also to pay back loans once you are out and working - hrsa.gov. The preparation part is really up to you - class sizes are OK at GU, the clinicals are whatever you make of them. IMO there is WAY too much busy work. Best of luck!
    Veronica
  9. 0
    Quote from Pokytrokyt
    I'm reading all these comments about the ABSN program at Georgetown with interest, because I was just accepted for the Spring 2010 Accelerated 2nd degree BSN program at GU.

    When I got to Georgetown for my interview last Saturday - which was also the last day of interviews - the rumor mill said that only 1/3 of applicants were invited for an interview, and only 1/3 of those would get offers. Yeesh. Since I was also applying for the Washington Hospital Center (WHC) scholarship program, about 40 of us were stuffed on a bus, driven to WHC for a tour, and had a group discussion with the teaching/RN staff at WHC. It was all supposed to be very casual, but I noticed the WHC staff taking lots of notes. After the discussion, we got back on the bus, drove back to GU, and had lunch. Afterwards there was a BSN overview video and a tour of NHS (School of Nursing and Health Sciences). More group discussion followed, and we got to hear from several current ABSN students (GU staff left the room). The students were positive about the program, talked about how much support they got from other cohort members, but did say new students were getting a break because the ogre who taught Patho was retiring - and anyone new had to be better. After all that, I had about a 4 minute interview with two prof's from NHS. The day started at 8:00am, and I got done about 4:30pm.

    My takeaway from the day was: the group discussions are crucial. The staff at GU and WHC are watching all day, judging you, ranking you. Be an active participant and ask questions. Your 4 minute interview is just to confirm their preconceptions. I think they're looking for people with a passion to be nurses, who will fit in as team players, and who want to go to GU come hell or high water. The last part is important, because GU does only one round of admissions for each cohort, with no waiting list. If they make you an offer and you turn them down, that slot in the cohort goes to waste.

    Anyway, the interview was on Saturday, and I got my acceptance email the following Tuesday. I'm still waiting to hear from WHC if I've been accepted for their scholarship program, but having come this far, I like my chances.

    I've talked with a number of people who are/were in nursing school at some of the DC-metro schools. Everyone complains about Pathophysiology, the cost, the traffic, the pace, the occasional marginal teachers. Since everyone who gets into one of these programs is obviously smart, the keys to success apparently are FOCUS and SUPPORT. The focus part means don't try to hold a job during the program, and deal with potential distractions before starting the program. Drama at home would be a major roadblock. Support means you can't do this all on your own. You need a support network - friends, family, cohort - whatever holds you up when you're feeling down.

    Anyway, that's my story.
    Did you get the WHC gig?

    Also for those who did the program what is the total in loans you owe?
  10. 0
    Quote from ms.jazzo
    Did you get the WHC gig?

    Also for those who did the program what is the total in loans you owe?
    Q1: No, I didn't get the WHC scholarship. Seems a bunch of us didn't. Maybe they just gave out fewer scholarships this year. Anyway, I could blow my 401K savings on this program, or take student loans - and I'll probably do some of both.

    Q2: The total TUITION for the program is somewhere around $70-72,000. That's for 4 semesters covering 16 months. On top of that you have books, fees, equipment, etc. Figure another couple thou for that. Room and board is assumed to be off campus at your own expense. Medical insurance (theirs or yours - it's mandatory) is $1700/yr. I've also had to get a bunch of immunizations and must get BLS for Healthcare/CPR certified before the program starts in January 2010.

    :typing

    - Alex
    Last edit by Pokytrokyt on Nov 12, '09


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