LTC for new LPN

  1. I am a nursing student in an RN program in the OKC metro area. I am also in need of some $$$, and am considering doing some nursing home work temporarily until I get to graduation. I have an LPN license but I've never worked as one before. Anybody out there like to share with me what my job description and workload might be like? Any recommendations?
    •  
  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   rambonurse
    Quote from CRNAsoon
    I am a nursing student in an RN program in the OKC metro area. I am also in need of some $$$, and am considering doing some nursing home work temporarily until I get to graduation. I have an LPN license but I've never worked as one before. Anybody out there like to share with me what my job description and workload might be like? Any recommendations?
    I have been an LPN in long term care since 1989 Ive always enjoyed it but its not for everyone we are the most regulated type of nursing,and most of the time its a thankless task .so be on your toes.
  4. by   HannasMom
    I work as a charge nurse on the night shift at a LTC. I love my job. Our facility is a skilled one, so we have residents which are long term and short term stays. We receive patients which may need IV's, we also do blood draws, PICC Lines and IV meds. I'm IV Therapy Certified, through our community college in the area. I also insert catheters, cath care, wound management, CBG's, insulins, oxygen therapy, treatments, carting, T.O.'s, ordering meds, etc. I have two CNA's on my shift. We have another night nurse on second floor and two aides on that floor too. It's a great place to work. I am attending school, so I can get my RN, in an LPN to RN program. I have a few pre-regs to finish up, to obtain for the RN program. But it can be done. Good luck on your job hunt.
  5. by   CRNAsoon
    Thanks to both of you for responding to my post. The comments that you've made are very helpful. I'm looking to work mainly Friday-Saturday-Sunday, as much as I can. As a new LPN, would I most likely be working alongside another LPN/RN or would I be expected to handle this on my own. How much training time would a facility like this allow for someone like me? I'm hoping it's not just "throw me to the wolves" time. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
  6. by   Blackcat99
    I wish I could tell you that you will have a 30 day orientation and lots of constant support from the other nurses. Unfortunately, after your orientation most LTC's will expect you to handle things on your own. I hope you will at least get a 2 week orientation since you are new. My experience has been that yes you do get "thrown to the wolves." I have wanted to help new nurses but have been unable to do so because of my own workload.At my last LTC job I was given only a 2 hour orientation before I was thrown to the wolves. Good Luck.
  7. by   CRNAsoon
    Quote from Blackcat99
    I wish I could tell you that you will have a 30 day orientation and lots of constant support from the other nurses. Unfortunately, after your orientation most LTC's will expect you to handle things on your own. I hope you will at least get a 2 week orientation since you are new. My experience has been that yes you do get "thrown to the wolves." I have wanted to help new nurses but have been unable to do so because of my own workload.At my last LTC job I was given only a 2 hour orientation before I was thrown to the wolves. Good Luck.
    Thanks for the post. I guess I'll just throw my hat in the ring and see what happens :-)
  8. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    I would advise starting on a Medicare/rehab unit of a LTC facility.

    Most units like this have both an RN and an LPN as well as CNAs.

    If you are paired up with an experienced RN who enjoys new grads and teaching, it could be a very good experience for you. Find out if any facilities in your area have a Baylor program. When you work Baylor, you usually work two 12 hrs shifts, Fri and Sat or Sat and Sun, for a total of 24 hrs a week, but get paid for 32 to 40 hrs. Some of these programs include medical ins.
  9. by   CRNAsoon
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I would advise starting on a Medicare/rehab unit of a LTC facility.

    Most units like this have both an RN and an LPN as well as CNAs.

    If you are paired up with an experienced RN who enjoys new grads and teaching, it could be a very good experience for you. Find out if any facilities in your area have a Baylor program. When you work Baylor, you usually work two 12 hrs shifts, Fri and Sat or Sat and Sun, for a total of 24 hrs a week, but get paid for 32 to 40 hrs. Some of these programs include medical ins.
    Thanks for the advice. I'm going on interviews, today, and will be certain to ask the question.

close