Help out a Murse (male nurse)?

  1. Hello,
    I was hoping someone might give me advice on Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals. I'm moving there as a new grad in December, and I'm trying to decide which institution to work for. If anyone has any info on salary, shifts, orientation for new grads etc, I would really appreciate it. Thank you!
    •  
  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   Christie RN2006
    Moving to Cleveland huh? Thats a bit far from Houston!! What made you decide to move up here?

    I don't have much personal experience with either hospital, but I did talk to one of the recruiters at University Hospital when I was looking for a job. She was friendly, but not the most helpful person. Both hospitals are fairly large so just keep that in mind. I think both are similar in pay... if I'm remembering right, they both start RN's around 23-24 dollars an hour and then you get shift differentials, etc. Just watch for catches such as parking... how much is it and where is it? Orientation all depends on what area of the hospital you are going to work in. Like in the ICU, you will have a much more intense orientation involving classes, etc.

    Just a word of advice, Cleveland Clinic is a research hospital and everything they do is geared around research. If that is something that interests you, then go for it. I have heard from some nurses that work there that a lot of times they don't treat their nurses the greatest... but just remember that is something that I have heard, I do not have personal experience with it.

    What I recommend you doing is applying to both and interviewing with several different people. Be sure to ask lots of questions in your interview about the hospital, the working environment, how they reward nurses for things such as degree advancement, exceptional work, etc. Most nurse managers really like it when the person they are interviewing asks lots of questions because it shows that they are truly interested.

    What area of the hospital would you like to work?
  4. by   PantherSN
    First of all, thank you so much for your advice. Well, I applied for a new grad position in the CICU at University on friday. Surprisingly they called me on monday morning for a phone interview, which I did today. She said I'm going to be recommended to the CICU nurse manager as a candidate, and they would like me to come up for another interview/shadow the unit and so on. I plan on flying up there on Oct. 12th to see what they're going to offer me. It sounds like they have a fairly committed orientation program (although it's new) for new graduates, which is 20 weeks long. So far it is sounding like a mutually beneficial relationship (I would like to attend a master's program at Case in the future).

    My fiance just started Law school at Cleveland State, so that's why I'll be making the trip up north. I've been up there a couple of times now, and I must say it's much more than I ever imagined for Ohio. We got a place in Lakewood, which seems like a really cool little area with a lot of culture.

    I have read through a lot of forums on Cleveland Clinic, and the general consensus seems to be that they don't treat the nursing staff very well. Maybe it's better that I'm leaning more toward University. Also, I've been looking but I can't find any specific new grad/intern programs in their job listings. Not sure if they're just full or if I need to just follow up with a phone call. Anyway, I'm really excited to fly out and see what comes of this interview.

    So you've been an RN for a year? How has it been so far (did you feel overwhelmed, or like you weren't ready)?
  5. by   Christie RN2006
    I still feel overwhelmed at times!! Strangely enough, it is usually when I'm floated to other floors and given a team of 8 patients with one in restraints, 2 in severe pain, 1 in TB isolation, and one just plain crazy... that is very unsafe!! I really like the ICU atmosphere where you will never have more than 2 patients by yourself. I like the more critical craziness than the tons of patients craziness.

    My orientation was about 16 weeks long and it included lots of classes. I thought my orientation was very thorough, so a 20 week orientation if done right would be great for new grads, especially those starting in the ICU!! The ICU is a whole different world from floor nursing!! Most of the new grad orientation programs in Ohio are new within the last few years. Lately there has been a big push to create new grad orientation programs because research shows that those grads tend to do better down the road.

    The CICU would be a great place to start if thats what you like. I definitely would recommend taking them up on the shadowing a nurse for a day offer. Don't be afraid to talk to the other nurses on the unit and ask them what they like/dislike and if there is anything they would/wouldn't change about their jobs. If they say everything is great and they wouldn't change a thing, they're lying! Every unit has some problems, whether they are little ones or big ones.

    Cleveland is definitely a city with a lot of culture... I tend to like Columbus much better though! What did you think Ohio was anyways... a bunch of corn fields?!? :P
  6. by   PantherSN
    No, no, no. I'm originally from KS, so I know all about corn fields and wheat fields. I just never really even thought of OH as somwhere I would live, so I was unsure what to expect (usually I research a place, Houston for instance). It was a last minute move, so we found out about it when we got there. Although, we are fortunate in that one of our best friends recently moved there with his fiance for a job change (historical preservation architect). Cleveland is a great place for that to, so much history, I love it.

    I can't say that I have explored Columbus yet, just driven through on the way up to Cleveland. What is it that you like more about Columbus? I actually thought about looking for jobs down there, but I REALLY don't want to make the commute.

    The 20 week program sounds good over the phone, but you never know. I inquired, but not much info was conveyed about the specifics (class time before going to the floor, does patient load increase progressively etc). We'll see!
  7. by   Christie RN2006
    Its 2 hours to Columbus from Cleveland. I live at the halfway point between the two. I work at medcentral mansfield www.medcentral.org its the biggest hospital and the only trauma center between columbus and cleveland. I highly recommend any of our ICU, Stepdown units or ED, but I wouldn't work on any other floor. Our starting pay is 20.55 (I think) and you make 3/hr for night shift (3p-7a) So I'm making 23.55/hr and I get a little bit extra for weekends and stat pager when I'm that. You could also check into some of the Akron hospitals too... thats not too far from Cleveland. I've heard good things about Akron General, but it tends to be hard for new grads to get a job on the good floors there.

    When I talked to University hospital they did the "two-step" around some of my questions and never really completely answered me on some things, so I was really leary of working there. I like it when people are straight forward with you... So them not telling you the specifics sounds similar to the situation they put me in.

    The reason I like Columbus so much better is because it is so much cleaner and safer. Cleveland has a lot of really bad areas and tends to be a lot dirtier. Columbus also has better shopping...
  8. by   PantherSN
    Well I spoke with CCF today and they do have new grad orientation, you just apply for any RN position and they incorporate it. I went ahead and applied, hopefully they can schedule something while I'm already there. I've been thinking about it, and I would hate to limit myself with just one interview and be forced to base my decision on only that encounter. CCF orientation is a bit shorter (8-10wks), but maybe it's more involved. We'll see!

    Thanks for entertaining my questions, I was beginning to wonder if anyone would ever respond. I reposted the same question with "Murse" in the title cause I thought it might catch a little more attention.
  9. by   NativeSundance
    Personally, I would DUMP both CCF and UH. They both have alot of unhappy staff. How about Metro? Benefits are better (awesome in fact) for sure and a better working environment. There are also many suburban hospitals that get plenty of action without all the "problems" of CCF and UH. All comes down to what you really want to do and what kind of environment you are willing to work in.
  10. by   PantherSN
    Quote from NativeSundance
    Personally, I would DUMP both CCF and UH. They both have alot of unhappy staff. How about Metro? Benefits are better (awesome in fact) for sure and a better working environment. There are also many suburban hospitals that get plenty of action without all the "problems" of CCF and UH. All comes down to what you really want to do and what kind of environment you are willing to work in.
    So what "problems" do you speak of? Are you a former employee of either institution or is this what you've heard from other people?
  11. by   NativeSundance
    There are multiple problems with both institutions. Short staffing not the least of them. I have worked for CCF and left there on excellent terms, but will never go back. Since we are a medical household (doctor, 2 RN's and 1 LPN) and all of our friends are doctors, nurses, pharmacists and so forth we know ALOT of folks who work for both healthcare systems. Most are generally unhappy with their work environment with two main reasons cited. 1) major short staffing on a regular basis. A real threat to your license. 2) nursing receives little respect. Many of these same folks have left CCF and/or UH and others just stick it out because they think it isn't any better anywhere else.

    Check out your intended unit in either facility carefully. If you can, talk to some of the staff and see how they feel about their unit before accepting a position there. When you tour the facility, pay close attention to the general attitudes and demeanor of the employees you encounter. See if the environment is one you will thrive in. Many people LIKE working in strained environments, many more do not. It is an individual thing for sure.

    CCF has made quite a name for itself worldwide, but the reality of being a staff nurse working there is a far different reality than the glamor one thinks they will encounter at that facility. I LOVED the unit I worked there, but the staffing problems were continuous and I felt my license was threatened every day. I left without anger and with proper notification and on very good terms. I went to a less glamorous hospital where I am paid far better, with far better working conditions in a positive work environment. My (parking garage) parking is FREE. I absolutely LOVE my job!!
  12. by   sugarsweet21612
    i have heard about the problems and unhappiness of CCF nurses, but my understanding is that many nurses at UH are extremely happy. i have not heard many complaints as far as nurses there. Metro nurses also seem to be pretty happy.
  13. by   PantherSN
    Quote from NativeSundance
    There are multiple problems with both institutions. Short staffing not the least of them. I have worked for CCF and left there on excellent terms, but will never go back. Since we are a medical household (doctor, 2 RN's and 1 LPN) and all of our friends are doctors, nurses, pharmacists and so forth we know ALOT of folks who work for both healthcare systems. Most are generally unhappy with their work environment with two main reasons cited. 1) major short staffing on a regular basis. A real threat to your license. 2) nursing receives little respect. Many of these same folks have left CCF and/or UH and others just stick it out because they think it isn't any better anywhere else.

    Check out your intended unit in either facility carefully. If you can, talk to some of the staff and see how they feel about their unit before accepting a position there. When you tour the facility, pay close attention to the general attitudes and demeanor of the employees you encounter. See if the environment is one you will thrive in. Many people LIKE working in strained environments, many more do not. It is an individual thing for sure.

    CCF has made quite a name for itself worldwide, but the reality of being a staff nurse working there is a far different reality than the glamor one thinks they will encounter at that facility. I LOVED the unit I worked there, but the staffing problems were continuous and I felt my license was threatened every day. I left without anger and with proper notification and on very good terms. I went to a less glamorous hospital where I am paid far better, with far better working conditions in a positive work environment. My (parking garage) parking is FREE. I absolutely LOVE my job!!
    Well thank you for giving me a little inside information on CCF. I guess my main concern is the sufficiency of the orientation program for new graduates. I really want to start in the critical care setting, but I simply will not do it if I feel the training is inadequate. I actually just got off the phone with Metro (had only briefly looked them over) and I'll be having an interview with them as well (pay is a little less to, though of course this will not be the deciding factor).

    Yeah I know what you mean about the "medical household", we have 2 MD's, 1 NP and 2 RN's. Of course this does me no good in trying to dissect the hospital systems in Cleveland.

    I was also concerned that UH has a ratio of 2-3, especially as a new graduate. Granted, the most likely scenario will consist of 1 very critical and 2 less critical, but in the ICU setting those 2 can turn very critical at any time. We'll see how the interviews go.
  14. by   NativeSundance
    Quote from PantherSN
    I was also concerned that UH has a ratio of 2-3, especially as a new graduate. Granted, the most likely scenario will consist of 1 very critical and 2 less critical, but in the ICU setting those 2 can turn very critical at any time. We'll see how the interviews go.
    PLEASE check out your intended unit carefully before signing on the dotted line. The scenario you mentioned above is the ideal...but it is NOT, and I repeat *NOT* reality! TALK to the unit nurses a little bit and you will see. The units are a VERY overwhelming place to start as a new grad. Everyone always wants to go there, but it is INTENSE. You will get an orientation, but you must be able to think and fly by the seat of your pants and have outstanding critical thinking skills and prioritization skills. You must become familiar with all the equipment used in the units very rapidly. You are typically going to do ALOT on your own, even in orientation, because your preceptor will be busy and you will be short staffed. REMEMBER...it is YOUR license. I have not personally worked in the units because I am a certified trauma junkie and stick to the trauma rooms in the ER, but I know the units in most hospitals have a dickens of a time keeping staff because they employ nurses that are not experienced and have no idea what they're walking into. The reason they employ inexperienced nurses and new grads in the units is because the turn over rate is huge and it is a matter of hiring anyone they can to fill the staffing requirements. In hospitals that have a stable and happy staff, they will not hire new grads into ANY critical care setting (MICU, CICU, ER, PICU, SICU etc).

    I wish you good luck in your job selection! Look over you options carefully in all facilities before making your choice. Any hospital will be happy to have you, so the choice is yours! Be careful though so your choice doesn't end up biting you in the backside.

Must Read Topics


close