BSN or ADN? What S/I choose?

  1. I really need your expert advice! I have to make a decision for Fall 2005. I have been accepted to Stark State in Canton for the class of 2007(which classes will begin Fall of 2005). Stark offers a 2-year RN degree. ALSO, I will be eligible for admission into The University of Akron College of Nursing in Fall 2005. This program is a BSN--which will take me 3 years (fulltime) to complete. My question is....should I remain at Univ of Akron and go ahead and put one more year in to receive a BSN in nursing or should I go ahead and attend Stark State and finish w/ an associate's degree in nursing(which will only take 2 years fulltime)???? I have heard that RN's w/ a BSN and ADN both make the same starting wages. Is that true in our area in northeast Ohio? I work at Akron General Medical Center and they ONLY hire RN's w/ a BSN. I just don't want to rack up more student loans! I also have 4 children and I want to make the best decision w/ them in mind!

    YOUR COMMENTS AND ADVICE ARE EXTREMELY CRUCIAL FOR MY DECISION IN THIS MATTER!

    Thank you.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   canoehead
    Please go in under the "search" function and look at the many debates on that very subject. People feel strongly on both sides. If you had a more specific question after that we could probably be of more help to you.
  4. by   Renee' Y-Y
    If you are planning to move into management, you might as well go ahead & get your BSN. If you are planning on being a clinical nurse until you retire...ADN will probably be OK...you will probably get better clinical experience (in my opinion) from the ADN program...but again, what you put into nursing school, is what you get back...and yes, this is a hotly debated subject...mostly by academia, who many haven't been at the bedside in God-only-knows how long...until somebody starts publishing research & lobbying to change it, I expect this will continue to be a hotly debated subject that will continue to divide the profession...as if we don't already have enough issues within our profession as it is.
  5. by   Renee' Y-Y
    PS: I started as a BSN...and have worked with many grads from BSN & ADN programs.
  6. by   LPN2BSN
    I think it depends on what your ultimate goal is. I want to be a NP so I am doing the BSN route right now. My local college was going to make me go 3 years for my ADN, I figured why not just go 3 years and get the BSN and come out a head in the long run.
  7. by   JacelRN
    Hi Marelle,

    This is what I told a friend of mine in a similar spot as you. With children in mind, I advised her to get her ADN. This will give you nurses pay in a quicker time period and the BSN is something you can always go back for. Her children are young and the fact that you give up so much putting your education first really takes away from family. She plans on working as a nurse and then going back to get her BSN.

    If your situation is a good one with your time spent and you can afford to go that extra year now, then go for it. It will only look that much better on your resume and like the others said, you can go on if you want more easily into management or to get your master's degree.

    If you plan to be a floor nurse for your career then the ADN is all you need.

    Ultimately the decision is yours but with everything considered it is a choice of one more year or not. Which ever is best for 1) Your career goals 2) Your time and family and 3) What you are willing to endure through is the best way to go.

    The way I look at student loans is they are worth it in the long run, do whatever it takes to reach your goal.

    Good luck in your decision,
    JacelRN
  8. by   swannie
    It may be true about the wages, but the employment oppertunities, and the advancement oppertunities are far greater for a BSN rather than a 2-year degree. In several western states, a 2-year RN is not even recognized, but rather worked as a STNA, and a BSN is the STARTING requirement for an RN (as opposed to having a master's). If you are strictly all about staff/floor work, then the 2-year is all you'll need. But if you plan on advancement, climbing the corporate ladder, or becoming an APN, PA, MSN, or any other higher-learning nurse, the starting point for qualifying for a higher degree is possession of a BSN. Do hope this helps.




    Quote from marelle
    I really need your expert advice! I have to make a decision for Fall 2005. I have been accepted to Stark State in Canton for the class of 2007(which classes will begin Fall of 2005). Stark offers a 2-year RN degree. ALSO, I will be eligible for admission into The University of Akron College of Nursing in Fall 2005. This program is a BSN--which will take me 3 years (fulltime) to complete. My question is....should I remain at Univ of Akron and go ahead and put one more year in to receive a BSN in nursing or should I go ahead and attend Stark State and finish w/ an associate's degree in nursing(which will only take 2 years fulltime)???? I have heard that RN's w/ a BSN and ADN both make the same starting wages. Is that true in our area in northeast Ohio? I work at Akron General Medical Center and they ONLY hire RN's w/ a BSN. I just don't want to rack up more student loans! I also have 4 children and I want to make the best decision w/ them in mind!

    YOUR COMMENTS AND ADVICE ARE EXTREMELY CRUCIAL FOR MY DECISION IN THIS MATTER!

    Thank you.
  9. by   Erin RN
    While I hate this discussion, I will bite again. I am an ADN and have been for nearly 14 yrs now. I have been charge nurse, I have been a subacute care unit manager. I have been a regional manager for a project for the state of Washington. Although furthering your education is ALWAYS a good idea many OPPORTUNITIES come a individuals way based on who they are..ie: experience, personality, networking not based on the ADN/BSN premise. BTW to the previous poster, a PA is not a nurse at all. If you have the opportunity to do the BSN and it makes sense with your life, you should pursue. The ADN , by the time you have taken all of the pre-reqs, is nearly as long. What I liked about my ADN program is that after the first yr in class I was able to take my LPN exam and work as an LPN part time while finishing the RN..I gained experience and had a job 6 months before I graduated with the RN that I merely slid into as soon as I knew I passed..if you do decide to go the MSN route there are also programs in which you get the BSN as you are working toward the MSN..many options. It just seems like whenever anyone asks the question the issue of management comes up and the fact that an RN has to have the BSN to be considered. This has NEVER come up in all of my time as an RN. My current position stated BSN preferred, they hired me anyway based on my past experience. I also review med mal and was working on a case in which I was asked to be an expert witness for the defense I told the atty I did not have BSN..he said, "I don't care, you are an RN aren't you?". Anyways just my experience..Erin
  10. by   LeesieBug
    Considering the fact that it will only take one more year, I would go with the BSN. Why not just get it all done in one shot?

    Actually, comparing the class sequences of Stark and Akron, you are really only going to school one more semester to get the BSN, since you have all the pre-req's done already. Stark's nursing program does classes in the summer, and Akron's doesn't. So five semesters for ADN, six for BSN.
    Last edit by LeesieBug on Mar 25, '04

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