anyone work as a PCNA for the Cleveland Clinic?

  1. 0
    i have a few questions for you. i'm a new grad RN and am awaiting to hear back for a second interview but i heard that it can take weeks to months so i am looking into their PCNA jobs to start working in the hospital and keeping some skills fresh. i also volunteer there.

    1. what is the interview process like for PCNA and do they hire new ones often? i'm under the impression they are continually hiring PCNAs.

    2. what are the shift options, 8hrs? 12hrs? days/nights? is there a minimum or maximum amount of hours you can work per week?

    3. i hear the pay is about $9 for full time and $11.50 PRN, is this still valid?

    4. i am interested in the PRN shifts and wondering if there is a maximum amount of hours i could work per week, i'd be interested in working as much as possible and then taking a few days off in between.

    Any info will really help thanks!!
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  4. 9 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    I worked there as a PCNA on H80, which is an internal med/telemetry floor. I only worked there for a short time though because I found a better position that was also much closer to home.

    With that said, it seems like they are always hiring PCNAs. My interview process wasn't really a true interview...I met with the unit director, told me about the position, figured out a schedule and if I wanted to work FT, PT or PRN. I took a tour...etc. I think the only question they asked me was "tell me about yourself" lol. I think that unit was in desperate need of PCNAs, tbh.

    Shift options are 12 hours where I worked, but it might be different by unit. I was only ever able to schedule for 12 hour shifts. For awhile I worked PRN days (three 12s a week) then switched to PRN nights once I was back in nursing school (worked one maybe two shifts/week.) I never had to do rotating shifts like the nurses do, which is where you work two weeks on days, then two weeks on nights and repeat. I don't know if they changed that, but keep that in mind if you're not interesting in working rotating shifts. I never had a problem getting in my hours, either. Usually the PRN employees are the first to be called off but that was never the case for me. I can't tell you about the maximum number of hours because I only ever worked a max of three shifts/week. After three shifts on my floor that was all I could take lol. My unit was VERY busy.

    PRN wage was like $12.50. Not sure what they pay FT or PT.
  6. 0
    thanks for all the info it's very helpful. i'd be interested in working nights PRN 3 shifts a week. i'm trying to decide if working for the clinic as a nursing aid will be more beneficial (by networking and getting my foot in the door at the specific hospital i want to work for) than working in long term acute care / nursing homes?...

    any thoughts on that? i know i could make more money in LTAC but my goal is to get a position with the cleveland clinic. i'm just not sure if PCNA work would be considered good or better experience than working as a nurse in LTAC? there is just such a stigma with LTC which is unfortunate as that's pretty much the only entry level nursing jobs out there at the moment.

    currently i am also doing these things:

    * enrolled in a nursing refresher course to keep my knowledge/skills up (graduated in june 2011)
    * taking IV therapy certification course for LPN/RN in october
    * taking a 12-Lead EKG seminar course in october
    * volunteering as a patient advocate at the cleveland clinic

    thanks for your advice!
  7. 0
    also, does anyone know if an RN can work as a "Patient Care Nursing Assistant" in Ohio? this is not a state certified position but i don't know if i qualify being an RN. i've been searching on the Ohio BON but i can't find the info.

    any RN's out there working as PCNAs or CNAs in Ohio?
  8. 0
    RNs are allowed to work as PCNAs in Ohio:

    "Can a licensed practical nurse / registered nurse work as a patient care assistant? The Nurse Practice Act does not prohibit a nurse from limiting his/her employment responsibilities to that of a patient care assistant or other unlicensed personnel. The licensed nurse that accepts employment in a position that does not require a nursing license and who chooses not to engage in licensed nursing practice should not identify him/herself as a nurse. If he/she identifies himself as a nurse or engages in the practice of nursing he/she will be accountable under the Nurse Practice Act and administrative rules."
  9. 0
    RNs are allowed to work as PCNAs in Ohio:

    "Can a licensed practical nurse / registered nurse work as a patient care assistant? The Nurse Practice Act does not prohibit a nurse from limiting his/her employment responsibilities to that of a patient care assistant or other unlicensed personnel. The licensed nurse that accepts employment in a position that does not require a nursing license and who chooses not to engage in licensed nursing practice should not identify him/herself as a nurse. If he/she identifies himself as a nurse or engages in the practice of nursing he/she will be accountable under the Nurse Practice Act and administrative rules."
  10. 0
    I worked as a nurse tech in Ohio when I had my RN license, but I was licensed in Texas. I was just waiting to move. As long as you don't identify yourself as a nurse and stay within your scope of practice as a PCNA/nurse tech, you can work as an assistant.

    There are entry-level jobs in hospitals, not just LTC facilities. What do you want to do most? Some are perfectly happy with working in LTC; others want something else. It's a shame that a lot of hospitals do not consider LTC experience as "acute experience" (but I really think it should be, because they do deal with a lot of things that "acute care" nurses do in hospitals) BUT keep that in mind if you're thinking about working LTC for awhile and then transitioning. I'm not saying it is impossible to get a position in a hospital after working at an LTC facility for x amount of time, but it can be difficult.

    I think being a PCNA at The Clinic would be beneficial because you can network. A lot of hospitals will now look at internal candidates for open positions first before looking into external candidates. Why not just try to apply for an RN position at The Clinic instead? They also may ask you that question during a potential interview.
  11. 0
    thanks, yea i just learned that i am allowed to work as a PCNA. my only question is, do you think i should include the fact that i'm an RN on my application? i know they say not to 'identify' myself as an RN but i'm assuming that just means while i am actually working as an assistant and not during the application process.

    i have already applied to a new graduate position at the clinic so they have my information on file. i am also looking at all and any entry level RN positions in ohio, including LTAC. after my initial phone interview with the CC i was told that they just hired most of their new grads recently but that they will be having another big hiring event most likely this winter, so basically i am going to attempt to get a new grad job then, but of course in the meantime i want to be utilizing my skills, and networking as much as possible. that is why i think working at the clinic as a PCNA as opposed to full time in LTC might be a better move for me at this time....

    thanks for your advice!


    Quote from turnforthenurseRN
    I worked as a nurse tech in Ohio when I had my RN license, but I was licensed in Texas. I was just waiting to move. As long as you don't identify yourself as a nurse and stay within your scope of practice as a PCNA/nurse tech, you can work as an assistant.

    There are entry-level jobs in hospitals, not just LTC facilities. What do you want to do most? Some are perfectly happy with working in LTC; others want something else. It's a shame that a lot of hospitals do not consider LTC experience as "acute experience" (but I really think it should be, because they do deal with a lot of things that "acute care" nurses do in hospitals) BUT keep that in mind if you're thinking about working LTC for awhile and then transitioning. I'm not saying it is impossible to get a position in a hospital after working at an LTC facility for x amount of time, but it can be difficult.

    I think being a PCNA at The Clinic would be beneficial because you can network. A lot of hospitals will now look at internal candidates for open positions first before looking into external candidates. Why not just try to apply for an RN position at The Clinic instead? They also may ask you that question during a potential interview.
  12. 0
    They will probably ask you in your interview what your goals are or "where you see yourself in 5 years" (or something along those lines), so I would go ahead and put the fact that you are an RN on your application. They also already have your information on file for when you applied to those RN positions.

    And yes, not identifying yourself as an RN means when you are working. You just can't go around telling your patients that you are a nurse and partake in those nursing skills (med administration, IVs, etc).

    As a PCNA, you will be doing a lot of very basic nursing care - bathing/hygiene, toileting, I/O, blood sugar checks, d/c foleys/IVs, vital signs and helping to answer call lights. I was also allowed to do very simple dressing changes. Look and see if The Clinic still offers a PCT (patient care tech) position. You will have the same duties as a PCNA but you can also insert foley catheters and draw blood.
  13. 0
    I don't think the hiring process is any less cumbersome for PCNAs than it is for RNs... I'd also be willing to bet that if you apply as a PCNA and get an interview and they like you - the manager would find out you're licensed and hire you as an RN rather than a PCNA.


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