Youngest labor patient? - page 5

What is the youngest age patient you have taken care of or has b een on your L&D unit? I was floored the other week when we had a 12 year old in labor. Yes, 12 years old. Merely a baby herself,... Read More

  1. by   TweetiePieRN
    FOUND THIS IN OUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER TODAY!!!

    Man suspected of sex assault after 11-year-old gives birth
    By Elizabeth Hume -- Bee Staff Writer
    Published 2:15 am PDT Tuesday, May 4, 2004

    SACRAMENTO - Police arrested a 35-year-old man on suspicion of sexual assault after an 11-year-old gave birth Friday to a 4-pound baby girl at Sutter Memorial Hospital, officials said.
    The 11-year-old's parents said they were unaware of her pregnancy, according to police spokesman Sgt. Justin Risley. They assumed she had put on some extra weight, he said.

    The day after she gave birth, police arrested a family friend, Sae Sou Lee of Sacramento on suspicion of lewd and lascivious acts with a child, sexual battery and other sexual charges.

    Both the 11-year-old and her baby were placed in protective custody, Risley said.
  2. by   mariessas_mom
    Quote from Mel D
    Lots of teen moms in my neighborhood. Sometimes pushing one baby in a stroller with another on the way! Of course all their friends have babies, too. So sad.

    In clinical there was a pt in labor who was 12, the father was 14, and her mother was 26. Imagine being a grandmother at 26.
    Unfortunately, it is a never ending cycle. The grandmom who is 26 now will probably be a great-grandma by the time she is 38. So sad, some kids just don't have a chance.
  3. by   border rn
    My yougest was 11 she did not know she was pregnant and neither did her parents. She came to the ER with "sever abdominal pain" How can you not know your child is pregnant? The shocked families wisely put the baby up for adoption. She was a sweet little girl and so scared, and her family left her by herself after she delivered. I spent alot of time with her that night. She said she never really had sex they just had fooled around. She probably did not even know what sex was. I fear for our children living in a society that puts teens on a pedastol by giving them baby showers and pressuring them to keep their babies. I have a 13 year old boy and a 12 year old girl and it frightens me to think they could be involved with sex at such a young age. I guess that is why I am the over protective mother and they carry walkie talkie with them and I must know where they are and who with at all times and I will walk around and check on them.

    Last year we had a group of girls ages 15-18 who were all friends and all got pregnant together. They thought it was so cool and they did not care who the fathers were. I was the lucky nurse to take care of the first one who came in, the mother was nuts crying and praising her 15 year old for this grandchild. After I took care of the first one the family and friends liked me so much every time one would come in they would request me to be their nurse. I am glad I am able to do my job and not let my own feelings interfere with the way I care for my patients.
  4. by   hrt_rn
    Before going to nursing school, I worked as a phlebotomist in a large teaching hospital. On my morning run one day, I collected blood from a 10 year old that was admitted for "Termination of pregnancy". I have never forgotten her scared face.
  5. by   fergus51
    My youngest had just turned 12. Step father was the father of the baby. It was horrific.

    Not very pc of me, but I actually do think we need to start really being critical about teen parenthood in our society. It is never a good thing for a child to have a child. Age is not all about state of mind, it's also about AGE. If you can't even drive a car or hold a job or finish school, how is that a good time to have a baby? We have become so accepting of this that some girls think it's no big deal. Well, it is a big deal.
    Last edit by fergus51 on May 4, '04
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    this whole thread and the comparison of horror stories is making me physically ill. It's just too sad that ANY child is subjected to such horrors to me.
  7. by   Kyriaka
    It is a sad cycle. I dont believe it is so much as ignorance of birth control. But rarely do these girls ever have the love of a man that is not sexual. A father that loves them and is around.

    And some of them just want something to love who will love them back.

    And then others view it thru rose colored glasses and it being so "romantic" not realizing that they will most likely live the rest of their lives in poverty.
  8. by   border rn
    Quote from fergus51
    My youngest had just turned 12. Step father was the father of the baby. It was horrific.

    Not very pc of me, but I actually do think we need to start really being critical about teen parenthood in our society. It is never a good thing for a child to have a child. Age is not all about state of mind, it's also about AGE. If you can't even drive a car or hold a job or finish school, how is that a good time to have a baby? We have become so accepting of this that some girls think it's no big deal. Well, it is a big deal.
    I completely agree with you. Pregnancy has been romanticized. Having a baby is a tough thing at any age but when you yourself have not had the chance to grow and develop...... It is just so sad.
  9. by   prinzessdy
    I saw this post and just had to reply. The youngest pt I saw was 14yrs and it was me. I remember walking into the hospital (L&D) and the nurses and pts was giving me mixed looks. some was sympathy and some was disgust. It was understandable because I looked like I was maybe 11, 106 lbs at del. A midwife took me thru prenatal care and del my baby and she was great, infact she inspired me to become a midwife. She gave me words of encouragement and plenty of statistics that I will never forget. Now I have been in college for 4 and 1/2 years ( 2 years wasted on pre med, which was not for me, and 2 years doing pre reqs for nursing) I knew at the age of 14, that I wanted to be a midwife and it was all because of her. So when young girls (children) come in pregnant, pleaasse dont talk down to them and show them the sympathy that you would a regular child but not to much. the feelings are very detectable. I knew whe a nurse thought that I was a lost child and it made me feel bad. Your words and actions mean so much to that child. I promise it will make some sort of impact on their life. Thanks Pam GlennCNM
  10. by   Spidey's mom
    Had an 18 year old recently. Mom in jail for drugs. Dad out of the picture. The 18 year old admitted to at least 8 partners in the last year. Had copious veneral warts. Was mean and angry and rude to the nurses. Married the supposed father of the baby. That poor baby.

    Had another girl come in who was 20. Her boyfriend is recently divorced from another woman who has his kids. Not sure if he is the father of this baby. DNA testing being requested by the police because there is a possibility the FOB is 15 . .so she could be arrested for rape.

    Where is that deserted tropical island and when can my kids and I leave?

    steph
  11. by   MaggieJo
    hmm.... I saw this post and thought over and over how I needed to respond. I was that young labor patient that many of you are talking about, and I think that the majority of you are probably very good L&D nurses, so don't take offense to what I am about to say.
    I think that a lot of you are forgetting the patient. All of these "what's the world coming to" type of posts really bother me. Have you ever looked at that little girl that's laboring, and wondered how she got in that hospital bed? Sometimes---especially with the very young ones---the girl is not there because she wants to be, or because "being pregnant is romanticized." I would guess that a lot of them have been sexually assaulted. Did you know that the statistics now are 1 in 3 women will be sexually assaulted in their lives. Just think about it. What would make a 12 year old girl want to have sex!? She's not matured physically enough for sex to be pleasurable. It is probably extremely painful for her.
    So, before you start to judge these teenage girls that come to your unit, just ask yourself "What has this girl been through?" And, so what if she is the stereotypical "I want to be pregnant" teenager? It's still your duty, as her nurse, to be her support while she's in labor. Because I assure you that your attitudes towards her do come across, and they DO make a difference -good or bad. I am junior nursing student in a BSN program because of the excellent RN that I had while I was in labor with my daughter. This woman is a lot of the reason that I'm not going to become another statistic. Census was down at the hospital, and I was her only patient. She sat with me the majority of the time that I was in labor, and encouraged me to make something of myself, and to not let my circumstances become what defined me.
    So, to make this post a little bit shorter, I just wanted to share with ya'll. I'm not trying to step on people's toes, I just want you to understand the kind of impact that you could possibly have on one of those girls. At least be a kind face to her, because she's getting the lectures, stares, etc... everywhere that she turns.
    -Maggie
  12. by   fergus51
    Quote from MaggieJo
    hmm.... I saw this post and thought over and over how I needed to respond. I was that young labor patient that many of you are talking about, and I think that the majority of you are probably very good L&D nurses, so don't take offense to what I am about to say.
    I think that a lot of you are forgetting the patient. All of these "what's the world coming to" type of posts really bother me. Have you ever looked at that little girl that's laboring, and wondered how she got in that hospital bed? Sometimes---especially with the very young ones---the girl is not there because she wants to be, or because "being pregnant is romanticized." I would guess that a lot of them have been sexually assaulted. Did you know that the statistics now are 1 in 3 women will be sexually assaulted in their lives. Just think about it. What would make a 12 year old girl want to have sex!? She's not matured physically enough for sex to be pleasurable. It is probably extremely painful for her.
    So, before you start to judge these teenage girls that come to your unit, just ask yourself "What has this girl been through?" And, so what if she is the stereotypical "I want to be pregnant" teenager? It's still your duty, as her nurse, to be her support while she's in labor. Because I assure you that your attitudes towards her do come across, and they DO make a difference -good or bad. I am junior nursing student in a BSN program because of the excellent RN that I had while I was in labor with my daughter. This woman is a lot of the reason that I'm not going to become another statistic. Census was down at the hospital, and I was her only patient. She sat with me the majority of the time that I was in labor, and encouraged me to make something of myself, and to not let my circumstances become what defined me.
    So, to make this post a little bit shorter, I just wanted to share with ya'll. I'm not trying to step on people's toes, I just want you to understand the kind of impact that you could possibly have on one of those girls. At least be a kind face to her, because she's getting the lectures, stares, etc... everywhere that she turns.
    -Maggie
    Um YEAH, I've thought that. Did I forget to mention that the step dad was the father of the 12 year old's baby? Hello, statutory rape! Authorities get called and social services gets involved. We don't take these things lightly, believe me. It is haunting and something that will stay with me until the day that I die.

    But to pretend that some teenagers don't romanticize the notion of childbearing is just being unrealistic. I have seen it. I've had a teenage mom just gushing over the fact that this baby will increase her paycheck and she can still go to school and her and the dad can get married and the baby will be so cute and he'll look after it while she goes to university and her friends are all so jealous! A year later, things look a little different for most. It's still possible to go to university and get married and have a great life, but that doesn't mean we should pretend it will be easy. Having a baby at 14 will make things a lot harder. That's the reality.

    I don't lecture or anything (cause it's too late once they are pregnant and that isn't my job), but I do think societal attitudes do need to change in an effort to prevent these pregnancies in the first place.
  13. by   border rn
    Quote from MaggieJo
    hmm.... I saw this post and thought over and over how I needed to respond. I was that young labor patient that many of you are talking about, and I think that the majority of you are probably very good L&D nurses, so don't take offense to what I am about to say.
    I think that a lot of you are forgetting the patient. All of these "what's the world coming to" type of posts really bother me. Have you ever looked at that little girl that's laboring, and wondered how she got in that hospital bed? Sometimes---especially with the very young ones---the girl is not there because she wants to be, or because "being pregnant is romanticized." I would guess that a lot of them have been sexually assaulted. Did you know that the statistics now are 1 in 3 women will be sexually assaulted in their lives. Just think about it. What would make a 12 year old girl want to have sex!? She's not matured physically enough for sex to be pleasurable. It is probably extremely painful for her.
    So, before you start to judge these teenage girls that come to your unit, just ask yourself "What has this girl been through?" And, so what if she is the stereotypical "I want to be pregnant" teenager? It's still your duty, as her nurse, to be her support while she's in labor. Because I assure you that your attitudes towards her do come across, and they DO make a difference -good or bad. I am junior nursing student in a BSN program because of the excellent RN that I had while I was in labor with my daughter. This woman is a lot of the reason that I'm not going to become another statistic. Census was down at the hospital, and I was her only patient. She sat with me the majority of the time that I was in labor, and encouraged me to make something of myself, and to not let my circumstances become what defined me.
    So, to make this post a little bit shorter, I just wanted to share with ya'll. I'm not trying to step on people's toes, I just want you to understand the kind of impact that you could possibly have on one of those girls. At least be a kind face to her, because she's getting the lectures, stares, etc... everywhere that she turns.
    -Maggie
    I think perhaps you missed the point of what I wrote. I said that even though I have my own opinion I DO NOT let it show in how I treat my patients They have made a choice and now they are living with it. I think that it is so very unrealistic though to say that pregnancy is not romanticized. It is I see it everyday, things will be so wonderful, my baby will be so perfect ect.... It is a tough world out there and good for you for making something of yourself. It is tough raising kids and going to school and working. I know, I left my husband who was abusive and went back to nursing school with a one year old and a two year old in tow. I applaud the fact that you are doing something with your life. Just don't be so unrealistic about what others are doing in this world. Some of these moms are in fact abused and it is a horrible horrible thing, but some some exactly what they wanted someone to love, and now they have it whether the Dad is around or not. Good luck with your studies!

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