Why a C-Section? - page 6

Hi everyone, I was just wondering why so many women are choosing to undergo ceasarean delivery without even a trial of labor? Don't they realize it is a major abdominal surgery and they will be in... Read More

  1. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from SC RN
    Your "sexuality" and sex are two very different things; however I do understand that at age 23, this may not seem so. And why does a vaginal birth mean that you will not be satisfied or able to connect with your spouse afterwards? I guess I'm being dense on purpose, but you get my point.

    Before I get off topic, I want to say that I appreciate all of the comments on this topic but I'm still flumoxed as to why everyone seems to think that having a baby vaginally ruins your vagina and your ability to have enjoyable sex. I know of plenty of moms having enjoyable, orgasmic, over the moon sex even after a 4th degree. Does it take time? Does it take creativity? You bet it does. But who minds spending time and being creative with their spouse?

    I guess we will all never agree on this subject but I am still most interested in hearing from those who had a vaginal delivery and a cesarean section ... you all are really the only ones who can explain the physical and emotional differences (at least in your own experience). The rest of us can only guess and assume ... and you know what happens when you assume things!
    Sexuality involves giving and receiving pleasure....sex is the act. So I guess they aren't too far from being the same Maybe the poster you were responding to considers satisfaction/connection to mean something different than what any of us define it as such.

    According to my mother, who has had 5 children....sex is still good, but not the same (or sensitive) as it was before childbirth. I don't think I would dare ask my dad what he thinks though

    We all only live one life. Sex and sexuality are very important to some marriages (relationships) and nonexistant in others.

    I'm also interested in hearing from those that have had both done.
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from SC RN
    Your "sexuality" and sex are two very different things; however I do understand that at age 23, this may not seem so. And why does a vaginal birth mean that you will not be satisfied or able to connect with your spouse afterwards? I guess I'm being dense on purpose, but you get my point.

    Before I get off topic, I want to say that I appreciate all of the comments on this topic but I'm still flumoxed as to why everyone seems to think that having a baby vaginally ruins your vagina and your ability to have enjoyable sex. I know of plenty of moms having enjoyable, orgasmic, over the moon sex even after a 4th degree. Does it take time? Does it take creativity? You bet it does. But who minds spending time and being creative with their spouse?

    I guess we will all never agree on this subject but I am still most interested in hearing from those who had a vaginal delivery and a cesarean section ... you all are really the only ones who can explain the physical and emotional differences (at least in your own experience). The rest of us can only guess and assume ... and you know what happens when you assume things!
    I can speak to this as I have had a vaginal delivery (very difficult persistent OP w/3rd degree, Forceps-assisted after 3 hours' pushing) and a csection (breech baby girl).

    I can say with no doubt, the recovery period following the csection was MUCH harder than the vaginal delivery was. BUTTTTTTTTTTTTT---- I was able to re-establish sexual relations with my dh much sooner following the csection as my perineum was NOT involved in the painful process of recovery. I was unable to have sex comfortably for probably 3 months after my son was born----but that does not preclude "creativity" as you put it---I won't get into detail there, but yes, we did have other means of enjoying each other on a deeply emotional level. I guess we were mature enough to realize SEX was not "all that" esp with a newborn preemie son in the home----we just needed to connect on an emotional level, which was a big enough challenge, believe me.

    Seems to me, after the csection I was sooooooo sooooo sooo awfully tired. OMG, I was tired for days. I don't know why, if it's the additional healing internally, as well as externally, I had to undergo, but I do remember being so much more tired and so much more in pain after my csection. Also, I had to rely on narcotic pain meds to deal w/the post-partum pain w/the csection. After the vaginal delivery, even though my perineum was very sore, it seemed to me, Motrin and heat to the peri was enough to cope. I just don't remember even filling my script for the narc the OB wrote me. W/the csection, O boy, I used it--- and regularly---for about a week. I remember waking up in HORRIBLE burning pain in the first 3 or 4 mornings after my csection. I had to have my percoset on the bedside table and take it before I got up. Naturally, I hated the percoset....It made me even more sleepy and nauseous. But I had no choice but to use it. Motrin just does not cut it for surgical pain. Everytime I coughed, laughed or used my tummy muscles, I was reminded my abdomen was still healing. Ouch.

    I was lucky in that in the immediate post-partal recovery process, with the csection, I was able to breastfeed my daughter about 1 1/2 hours after birth, in my recovery room. I would have been able to nurse my son much more immediately, had he NOT been 6 weeks' premature and in distress and taken to the NICU 5 min after he was born......

    Women can breastfeed and/or bond IMMEDIATELY after a vaginal delivery, if the baby is well. That is a HUGE and DISTINCT advantage right there for a vaginal delivery, if you ask me. It alone makes it worth it to me.

    I also distinctly remember getting up to shower at 0600 (my son was born at 0453),. after my vaginal delivery. Heck, I even put on make-up to and dressed in my street clothes---I wanted to feel pretty even if I did not appear that way to others lol.

    I was in the nursery, visiting my baby, less than 2 hours' after birth. Had I had a csection, I would have to had waited a lot longer and been WHEELED In there to see him. That is not ideal, believe me, but heartbreaking---having to wait for someone to allow you to see your newborn in the nursery, if he/she is there.

    No, being that independent in self care would never, ever happen after a csection, even in the best of circumstances. I had to wait an entire day and a half before I felt nearly well enough to shower, and then it was rather excruriating and bloody. Ever have your uterus massaged after a csection---? YEOWCH , is all I will tell you.

    One thing I will NEVER forget about my vaginal delivery: seeing my son emerge into the world, right before my eyes. I looked down and literally watched him be born, saw his scrunchy little tiny face as he came out, and watched him take his first breaths as he emerged. I was even able to reach and touch him as he came out. How can I ever forget or recreate that? No, I will never, ever lose that precious image in my mind.

    Forget that w/a csection. All you will see is the blue curtain in front of your head. You will see the baby in the warmer, first, if you are lucky, and the warmer is in a place in your line of vision. Otherwise, you will have to wait til the staff bring the newborn to your head, so you can see and touch him/her. Then, they will whisk the baby back to the warmer or nursery, and you will wait to hold him/her until you are ensconced in your postpartum room, which could be an hour or several, depending on policies and protocols in your hospital. Huge difference to me.

    I would say all in all, the csection was a hell of a lot easier delivery- wise (well of course it was----it was planned, routine, and very easy--in and out in an hour....). But the recovery was hell.:stone

    The vaginal delivery was a speedy process from which to recover, but it was a long time before I could have "normal" sex w/the dh afterward. I was able to re-connect sexually w/my spouse about 2 or 3 weeks after my csection, no problem or contraindication there. I liked that---but that was the ONLY advantage I can name.

    All in all, I would prefer an uncomplicated vaginal delivery over a similarly uncomplicated csection, any day of the week. Anecdotal, I know, but it's just my opinion as one who has done it "both ways".
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Nov 1, '05
  3. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Quote from New CCU RN
    And obviously your friend is giving silly reasons for wanting a c/s. But what about the person that is postdates and an unfavorable cervix? She has a 50/50 chance of needing to be sectioned after a failed induction That could be argued that they should labor first and see what happens - but that is an awful cavalier statement. And that too drives up the costs and the potential complications.

    Yes a c/s has risks. But so does a vaginal delivery. The risks are to both the baby and the mom. Why shouldnt a patient hear the risks and benefits of each one and have an active contribution to what should be done?
    I am not saying that C-sections are all bad. I am just saying people should not get them for reasons that are unmedical. If it is safer for a particular woman to have a c-section over a vaginal birth, fine. But if you want to have your baby on th 15th because you have to go some where on the 20th...no.
  4. by   Nikki69
    I have two boys, both by c-section. I KNEW as soon as I seen the diagram on the wall of how big my vagina would have to get, I would not be giving birth naturally. But, my doctor assured me that everything would be okay.
    After being induced, I went through 14 hours of contractions, only dialated to barely a two, and my son's heart rate was going crazy on the monitor(above 180 and below 70 in a very short period of time). And yes, they switched monitors twice. During the night, they gave me morphine to help calm me until the doctor came back in-is that smart? Or could that have been why his heart rate went haywire?
    Anyway, I was up walking around two days afterward, and I don't remember the pain being anything unbearable. So, I decided to do it again with #2 child. It all depends on the person. When I think about it now, it would have been kind of nice to be able to experience actual labor and delivery, but it's too late now. That's okay, I love my boys just the same.:heartbeat
  5. by   edj02
    To answer TweetiePieRN:

    No, my comments were not directed at you in any way, I actually had Asoldierswife05 in mind when I made the comment. She had said several posts prior that she has full intentions of having a c-section without a trial of labor at all when and if she decides to have a baby. She may have "A tilted uterus and a small pelvic outlet"...but many women go on to have a totally normal vaginal delivery even with those issues. I just feel that Asoldierswife05 needs a little more information, that's all...at least give labor a try for a few hours. If it is going south quickly and you are making absolutely no progress, than fine, have the c-section...but your body's amazing abilities might just surprise you, which I hope you would realize as a nurse. FYI, I found out at my last gyno appointment that I have prominent ischial spines and a narrow pubic arch, but I am still going to give a vaginal delivery a fair try and I would love to avoid a c/s.
    For SmilingBluEyes: I thought your post was beautiful and I couldn't agree with you more. Watching a baby come out vaginally is a "precious" moment.
  6. by   sunnybrook23
    Quote from judyblueeyes
    I don't care how a woman decides to deliver. The delivery is a very, very small part of parenting.

    I DO NOT agree with this statement. If the mother has a negative experiance even if she was able to choose how she delivers, it DOES affect how she parents.

    Thank you.
    Last edit by VickyRN on Nov 5, '05
  7. by   sunny78
    i can say for me i had two c-sections and as i know every preg.is different as is every women,the first time around i did take longer to heal and i was not a nurse and not very well educated at all about the whole process,the second time around i got up from the hospital bed made myself walk up the hall and i left the hosp. the next morning and i was fine now i will not say by any means i did not hurt at times but for me MENTALLY i could not handle the thought of something that big coming out of something rather small!!! lol:chuckle and besides you can barely see the scar,and it doesnt make you less of a women giving birth vaginally or c-section so it really depends on ones thought and feelings towards it,
  8. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from sunnybrook23
    If the mother has a negative experiance even if she was able to choose how she delivers, it DOES affect how she parents.
    I visited your site which is very cute! I was just curious if you would elaborate a little on this statement please.
  9. by   Q.
    Quote from fergus51
    I had a patient in Canada given a section for "maternal anxiety".... She was scheduled for a section on the Friday, but came in Thursday night in labor. By the time they had her in the OR with the epidural in place, she was fully dilated and the baby was right down. We couldn't even get a cath in her because the baby was so low. Did we try to deliver vaginally? Nope. Pulled the baby back up for the section. It was hands down, the stupidest thing I have ever seen. That night we had to divert a high risk patient to another hospital much farther away because we wouldn't have enough post partum rooms available. The fact that this woman was going to take up an extra 2-3 days on post partum really steams me. Elective surgeries sometimes affect a lot of other people, and especially in Canada where we all pay for healthcare it does upset me to see people waste resources.

    I think it's interesting that the notion of "controlled risk" is also one reason women choose elective c-sections with no medical indications. People don't trust women's bodies anymore. They overestimate the amount of control the doctor has in an operating room too imo. They obviously haven't experienced some of the emergencies in the OR that I have.

    Excellent post, Tracy.
  10. by   judyblueeyes
    Quote from sunnybrook23
    I DO NOT agree with this statement. If the mother has a negative experiance even if she was able to choose how she delivers, it DOES affect how she parents.
    Thank you.
    Just for the record, I am in full favor of elective CS.
    Last edit by VickyRN on Nov 5, '05
  11. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from edj02
    I just feel that Asoldierswife05 needs a little more information, that's all...at least give labor a try for a few hours. If it is going south quickly and you are making absolutely no progress, than fine, have the c-section...but your body's amazing abilities might just surprise you, which I hope you would realize as a nurse.
    Well, I am glad to see how concerned
    you are about how I chose to deliver

    I don't think a c/s is something that I just want to decide to do in the heat of the moment, if the vaginal delivery doesn't work out... It is serious surgery with risks and complications, and I would like to prepare myself and my hubby mentally & emotionally prior to.

    I'm not pushing delivery by c/s on any posters in this discussion...therefore, I simply don't understand why vaginal delivery is being pushed on the elective c/s supporters.

    Yes, as a nurse I understand that our bodies can do incredible things and am constantly in awe of God's design. But as a nurse, I also realize that there is a diverse culture of people in this world with a variety of oppinions, values, and beliefs. Therefore, I chose not to judge others decisions, nor do I PUSH my personal beliefs upon them.
  12. by   Fiona59
    After 27 hours of labour and a high forceps delivery, I can honestly say I would rather have had the c-section I requested and was refused. Guess I live in the wrong province Fergus. At 16 hours the OB students wanted to do a section and my Dr. refused saying SHE felt I could deliver vaginally.

    Had a hospital stay of 8 days, due to incontinence, a torn cerevix, suspected fractured tailbone, and a few other goodies from my vaginal delivery.

    Sometimes we know our bodies better than our Dr. I would have saved our healthcare system a corrective surgery and later a hyst. due to prolapsed uterus that my gyne felt was due in a large part the damage done by vaginal delivery.
  13. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from Fiona59
    After 27 hours of labour and a high forceps delivery, I can honestly say I would rather have had the c-section I requested and was refused. Guess I live in the wrong province Fergus. At 16 hours the OB students wanted to do a section and my Dr. refused saying SHE felt I could deliver vaginally.

    Had a hospital stay of 8 days, due to incontinence, a torn cerevix, suspected fractured tailbone, and a few other goodies from my vaginal delivery.

    Sometimes we know our bodies better than our Dr. I would have saved our healthcare system a corrective surgery and later a hyst. due to prolapsed uterus that my gyne felt was due in a large part the damage done by vaginal delivery.
    Wow, Fiona! So sorry to hear about this. I agree with us knowing our bodies better. Was this your first birth?

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