Why a C-Section? - page 5

Hi everyone, I was just wondering why so many women are choosing to undergo ceasarean delivery without even a trial of labor? Don't they realize it is a major abdominal surgery and they will be in... Read More

  1. by   Q.
    I'm really not in favor of elective c-sections simply because of reasons that I hear ie: section babies are "prettier." Of course my opinion is that, that kind of statement indicates their maturity level for parenting in general and already at that point we're well past the point of no return here.

    C-sections are a tad riskier simply because they are major abdominal surgery. And, c-sections don't allow the babies to have that vaginal canal "squeeze" which helps their lungs. However, there are also cases where sections are better due to the indications. I had a c-section; I was in pre-term labor at 32 weeks; after being on Magnesium for 3 days still dilated to 5cm; problem was my daughter Sofia (twin B) was breech. My OB was comfortable with a breech extraction because my son Ian (twin A) was vertex but being only 32 weeks, Sofia's head was much larger than her body and were were fearful of cervical entrapment. The decision for a section was ultimately mine but it was made collarboratively with my OB, my perinatologist and the neonatologist.

    I do regret that I missed out on a vaginal birth though. I think it would have been absolutely awesome to experience pushing my babies out.
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Here is a link to an article discussing increased elective csection rates in the USA, from a British perspective, published Nov 2004:

    Study: U.S. women increasingly choosing C-sections without medical need
    LONDON - New research bolsters a growing body of evidence that an increasing proportion of women in the industrialized world are choosing to give birth by Caesarean section when there is no clear medical need.

    rest of article:

    http://www.azcentral.com/health/wome...ions19-ON.html

    (in this article, a quote exceeding 90% elective csections is cited for Brazil)
  3. by   mstigerlily
    Some more interesting articles (this subject is of interest to me!)

    http://www.birthlink.com/birthstories_set.html
    http://www.cnn.com/2004/LAW/03/19/colb.csection/
    http://www.stjohn.org/HealthInfoLib/...rticleID=84008
    http://www.keepmedia.com/pubs/Health.../09/12/1000768
    http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/200...al_c_sections/
    Letters re: Salon article

    I think if I had a bad vaginal delivery experience, or a previous 10 lb baby that I wasn't able to get out the vaginal route, I might want a csection too. But to want one right off the bat to me is strange.

    That said, I've taken care of many primips who got a csection for "macrosomia" and the baby was 7-8 lbs, a completely normal size. One was even 6 lbs 8 oz but she was sectioned because baby was "too big" on the ultrasound (mom was a normal size)


    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Here is a link to an article discussing increased elective csection rates in the USA, from a British perspective, published Nov 2004:

    Study: U.S. women increasingly choosing C-sections without medical need
    LONDON - New research bolsters a growing body of evidence that an increasing proportion of women in the industrialized world are choosing to give birth by Caesarean section when there is no clear medical need.

    rest of article:

    http://www.azcentral.com/health/wome...ions19-ON.html

    (in this article, a quote exceeding 90% elective csections is cited for Brazil)
    Last edit by mstigerlily on Nov 1, '05
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Q.
    I'm really not in favor of elective c-sections simply because of reasons that I hear ie: section babies are "prettier." Of course my opinion is that, that kind of statement indicates their maturity level for parenting in general and already at that point we're well past the point of no return here.

    .
    So well-said, Suzy. Congratulations ( a little late) on the births of your babies. :hatparty:
  5. by   chuckc
    I am kind of speechless reading this thread:stone It seems as we have become distrusting and disconnected from our bodies. I know that C-sections are sometimes necessary, I have had 2 C-sec and 1 VBAC. Sorry to see so many are fearful of childbirth. I think the medical community is responsible for generating this fear, it's all in the presentation. Just my opinion, no offense to anyone.
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Chuckc I am sorry; but I feel that is a very simplistic view. The sense of entitlement on the part of our "customer" (read: patient) and excessive litigation, and many other factors contribute.

    Plus: The fears of permanent physical changes are real, too. Please re-read this thread before automatically assigning blame to the medical community alone. It's a bit more complicated than that.
  7. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from edj02
    Isn't parenting supposed to be all about making sacrifices? If you are not willing to even sacrifice your vagina's elasticity for your child, what does that say about you?
    Who is this question directed at? I hope not at me. Yes, parenting is about sacrifices, definitely. For some women (not me here, okay) its not just the elasticity they lose, they lose their bladder control, some women lose bowel control thanks to tearing down to and thru the anus.

    Why would you even link a person deciding to have a c-section for the elasticity reason and parenting? Two different concepts.

    Just out of curiosity, do you have any children?
    Last edit by TweetiePieRN on Nov 1, '05
  8. by   fergus51
    I had a patient in Canada given a section for "maternal anxiety".... She was scheduled for a section on the Friday, but came in Thursday night in labor. By the time they had her in the OR with the epidural in place, she was fully dilated and the baby was right down. We couldn't even get a cath in her because the baby was so low. Did we try to deliver vaginally? Nope. Pulled the baby back up for the section. It was hands down, the stupidest thing I have ever seen. That night we had to divert a high risk patient to another hospital much farther away because we wouldn't have enough post partum rooms available. The fact that this woman was going to take up an extra 2-3 days on post partum really steams me. Elective surgeries sometimes affect a lot of other people, and especially in Canada where we all pay for healthcare it does upset me to see people waste resources.

    I think it's interesting that the notion of "controlled risk" is also one reason women choose elective c-sections with no medical indications. People don't trust women's bodies anymore. They overestimate the amount of control the doctor has in an operating room too imo. They obviously haven't experienced some of the emergencies in the OR that I have.
    Last edit by fergus51 on Nov 1, '05
  9. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from edj02
    Isn't parenting supposed to be all about making sacrifices? If you are not willing to even sacrifice your vagina's elasticity for your child, what does that say about you?
    I respectfully disagree with your position on this one. I don't believe that your choice of delivery has a thing to do with your parenting skills. I believe that delivery should be left up to the mother, after she is educated on both procedures. It is my body, and I will chose what happens to it.

    I have a tilted uterus, a very narrow pelvis, and have already experienced problems with lack of sensation during sex (and I am only in my twenties!) My sexuality is extremely important to me and my husband...I can't imagine living out the rest of my days after 23 without feeling like I am being satisfied and connecting with my spouse. It may appear vain to some, but I certainly do not think I should have to sacrifice my vagina for my child...as you put it. Its simply not necessary. And its really nobody's business but mine and my husbands. No one should be forced to have vaginal delivery just because someone else doesn't agree with elective c/s.

    I would hardly say that abdominal surgery is not a sacrifice in its own right. I understand the risks and painful recovery, and it certainly doesn't seem like a walk in the park to me. Not wanting to make sacrifices would equate to not having children at all, but not equate to wanting a c/s, IMO. I know I will make an amazing,loving parent someday regardless of how my baby comes out of my tummy.

    As for the pretty baby comment...that is just silly and sounds like someone who is very immature, or uneducated.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from fergus51
    I had a patient in Canada given a section for "maternal anxiety".... She was scheduled for a section on the Friday, but came in Thursday night in labor. By the time they had her in the OR with the epidural in place, she was fully dilated and the baby was right down. We couldn't even get a cath in her because the baby was so low. Did we try to deliver vaginally? Nope. Pulled the baby back up for the section. It was hands down, the stupidest thing I have ever seen. That night we had to divert a high risk patient to another hospital much farther away because we wouldn't have enough post partum rooms available. The fact that this woman was going to take up an extra 2-3 days on post partum really steams me. Elective surgeries sometimes affect a lot of other people, and especially in Canada where we all pay for healthcare it does upset me to see people waste resources.

    I think it's interesting that the notion of "controlled risk" is also one reason women choose elective c-sections with no medical indications. People don't trust women's bodies anymore. They overestimate the amount of control the doctor has in an operating room too imo. They obviously haven't experienced some of the emergencies in the OR that I have.
    very good points, Fergus.
  11. by   SC RN
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    I respectfully disagree with your position on this one. I don't believe that your choice of delivery has a thing to do with your parenting skills. I believe that delivery should be left up to the mother, after she is educated on both procedures. It is my body, and I will chose what happens to it.

    I have a tilted uterus, a very narrow pelvis, and have already experienced problems with lack of sensation during sex (and I am only in my twenties!) My sexuality is extremely important to me and my husband...I can't imagine living out the rest of my days after 23 without feeling like I am being satisfied and connecting with my spouse. It may appear vain to some, but I certainly do not think I should have to sacrifice my vagina for my child...as you put it. Its simply not necessary. And its really nobody's business but mine and my husbands. No one should be forced to have vaginal delivery just because someone else doesn't agree with elective c/s.

    I would hardly say that abdominal surgery is not a sacrifice in its own right. I understand the risks and painful recovery, and it certainly doesn't seem like a walk in the park to me. Not wanting to make sacrifices would equate to not having children at all, but not equate to wanting a c/s, IMO. I know I will make an amazing,loving parent someday regardless of how my baby comes out of my tummy.

    As for the pretty baby comment...that is just silly and sounds like someone who is very immature, or uneducated.
    Your "sexuality" and sex are two very different things; however I do understand that at age 23, this may not seem so. And why does a vaginal birth mean that you will not be satisfied or able to connect with your spouse afterwards? I guess I'm being dense on purpose, but you get my point.

    Before I get off topic, I want to say that I appreciate all of the comments on this topic but I'm still flumoxed as to why everyone seems to think that having a baby vaginally ruins your vagina and your ability to have enjoyable sex. I know of plenty of moms having enjoyable, orgasmic, over the moon sex even after a 4th degree. Does it take time? Does it take creativity? You bet it does. But who minds spending time and being creative with their spouse?

    I guess we will all never agree on this subject but I am still most interested in hearing from those who had a vaginal delivery and a cesarean section ... you all are really the only ones who can explain the physical and emotional differences (at least in your own experience). The rest of us can only guess and assume ... and you know what happens when you assume things!
  12. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    I respectfully disagree with your position on this one. I don't believe that your choice of delivery has a thing to do with your parenting skills. I believe that delivery should be left up to the mother, after she is educated on both procedures. It is my body, and I will chose what happens to it.

    I have a tilted uterus, a very narrow pelvis, and have already experienced problems with lack of sensation during sex (and I am only in my twenties!) My sexuality is extremely important to me and my husband...I can't imagine living out the rest of my days after 23 without feeling like I am being satisfied and connecting with my spouse. It may appear vain to some, but I certainly do not think I should have to sacrifice my vagina for my child...as you put it. Its simply not necessary. And its really nobody's business but mine and my husbands. No one should be forced to have vaginal delivery just because someone else doesn't agree with elective c/s.

    I would hardly say that abdominal surgery is not a sacrifice in its own right. I understand the risks and painful recovery, and it certainly doesn't seem like a walk in the park to me. Not wanting to make sacrifices would equate to not having children at all, but not equate to wanting a c/s, IMO. I know I will make an amazing,loving parent someday regardless of how my baby comes out of my tummy.

    As for the pretty baby comment...that is just silly and sounds like someone who is very immature, or uneducated.
    Hi! I agree with you! I have had some of the probs with my body you mentioned!! Well-written post and I couldn't have said it better.
  13. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from SC RN
    Your "sexuality" and sex are two very different things; however I do understand that at age 23, this may not seem so. And why does a vaginal birth mean that you will not be satisfied or able to connect with your spouse afterwards? I guess I'm being dense on purpose, but you get my point.

    I resent this post and find your comment about my age demeaning and inappropriate. I can clearly discern the difference between sex and sexuality. I do feel that my concerns are valid, as my mother had 2 vaginal births and a c/s. She also had a tilted uterus and narrow pelvis, tore from her vagina to her anus, required surgery, and has not been able to enjoy sexual sensation since. This put a strain on her and my father's relationship very early on, as she felt she was missing out in the bedroom, became depressed and felt "unsexy" (in her words), and simply lost the desire to have sex at all...thus a loss of connection and intimacy. It was hard on both of them. Sex is not everything, but it is definitely one important aspect of an intimate, loving relationship. I didn't realize that I would have to explain this in so much detail, but since you said you were being so dense...
    Last edit by nurse4theplanet on Nov 1, '05

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